Pot Smoking and Nursing - page 16

Im angry. I work for a small clinic in Northern CA. There are three RN's on staff at all time. Recently our Office Manager decided to start drug testing of all staff including Doctors. Well, one... Read More

  1. by   carolmaccas66
    Whether anyone likes pot or not, it's still illegal - in my country anyway. So smoke away - I couldn't care less if someone is high or mellow or what, but not if they're doing surgery on me, caring for me or driving a bus I'm on - THAT is scary. And I'm not naive enough to think that's never happened.
    I've worked with a GP who's hubby smoked dope all the time - she used to join him on occasion, even when she was on call. She said that & drinking were the only things that controlled her stress. And they had 2 young children in the house to care for.
    It's like the drink drivers that get caught - they never think it will happen to them - until they actually ++ injure or kill someone.
    I just hope the people on here aren't smoking etc the night b4 work & driving their cars as well when they are high (on anything). THAT really scares me.
  2. by   xtxrn
  3. by   egglady
    original post is 2002. just saying..
  4. by   xtxrn
    Quote from egglady
    original post is 2002. just saying..
    And I've been trying to look for those dates more consistently- LOL


    And whaddya know? It's someone defending their right to smoke and take care of patients who resurrected it
  5. by   xtian
    I think it's pretty sad this discussion is even here. My friend who is in school told me she was surprised to see how much drug use there is among the nursing students. Wow, good luck to us all.
  6. by   Aurora77
    Personally, I don't see a difference between occasional pot smoking on my day off versus having a drink or two when I'm off. In either case, I'm not fit to take of patients (I'm a cheap date when it comes to alcohol ). But, since pot's illegal and can get me fired, not to mention lose my license, I'm not taking that chance.

    I used to believe the hype that it's a gateway drug, that people get addicted to it. Sure, some people can and do use it that way, but the people I know that smoke pot only use it and nothing else and are far from addicted.
  7. by   xtxrn
    Quote from Aurora77
    Personally, I don't see a difference between occasional pot smoking on my day off versus having a drink or two when I'm off. In either case, I'm not fit to take of patients (I'm a cheap date when it comes to alcohol ). But, since pot's illegal and can get me fired, not to mention lose my license, I'm not taking that chance.

    I used to believe the hype that it's a gateway drug, that people get addicted to it. Sure, some people can and do use it that way, but the people I know that smoke pot only use it and nothing else and are far from addicted.
    That's great

    All I know is that EVERY person admitted for drug rehab I worked at (not the alcohol only group, who tended to be older) started with pot. Every one. I spent years taking histories from these folks, and without fail, pot was the first drug they used. Most (probably 90-95%) went on to harder stuff. There were a few that stayed with pot- and were like lampposts with no bulbs when they got there It does linger. Maybe it's not AS bad for light users, but it's in the system longer than the length of time it takes to feel ok.

    I had a co-worker who smoked pot, probably 3-5 times a week (guessing). I regret not turning her in. Now, in TX (or at least when I was there from 1985-2002) it was mandatory to report known users for most of that time. There is enough concern to warrant BON action. JME
  8. by   Bortaz, RN
    Quote from thisnurse
    well ok you guys are right...lets not break any laws ok?
    lets not speed...lets claim everything on our taxes (dont forget that 2 bucks you won on the scratch lottery) and as i recall some sex acts are still illegal (better stop doing those)
    if we are going to obey ALL laws, then lets obey ALL laws (you do wear seatbelts dont you, it is the LAW)
    and your kids are REALLY sick when they stay home from school because thats the LAW you know.
    your dog has a license doesnt it? thats the LAW too.

    and you do walk home from the bar dont you because the LAW says you cant drink and drive.
    You should look up the term "straw man argument". You're a master at it, and probably don't even know it. A natural, even.
  9. by   Aurora77
    Quote from xtxrn
    That's great

    All I know is that EVERY person admitted for drug rehab I worked at (not the alcohol only group, who tended to be older) started with pot. Every one. I spent years taking histories from these folks, and without fail, pot was the first drug they used. Most (probably 90-95%) went on to harder stuff. There were a few that stayed with pot- and were like lampposts with no bulbs when they got there It does linger. Maybe it's not AS bad for light users, but it's in the system longer than the length of time it takes to feel ok.

    I had a co-worker who smoked pot, probably 3-5 times a week (guessing). I regret not turning her in. Now, in TX (or at least when I was there from 1985-2002) it was mandatory to report known users for most of that time. There is enough concern to warrant BON action. JME
    I was just going off of my personal experience. I don't doubt that the heavy duty addicts had to start somewhere. But what percentage of pot smokers go on to become drug addicts, or use other drugs? How many addicts started with alcohol? Should alcohol then be banned as well?

    I definitely agree with you about your cowoker. Like I said, it's not something I would do since it is illegal. I just see it on par with having the occasional drink, but the law disagrees with me, so I obey the law.
  10. by   xtxrn



    @thisnurse:

    I don't speed, don't play the lottery, have the IRS figure my taxes, don't have kids, my dog is licensed, wear my seatbelt, and the only thing criminal about my sex life is that it could bore someone to death

    Not everyone looks for all the loopholes, or blatantly finds some law to break. Now there is a Southern state that has a law on the books about not eating fried chicken with a fork..... I wouldn't even break that one

    Scammers are scammers.... imho
  11. by   oneLoneNurse
    Being a nurse in the US, I have never touched the stuff, because of my fear I would get deported or worse. If I lived in the Great White I would recreationally use the stuff. I honestly don't think it does the body that much harm, in fact maybe some good. I really think my 85 year old mother should inhale some.
  12. by   Rob72
    "I think...", "I feel..." Intersting, isn't it, that there are no defensible arguments for pot?

    A few examples. The majority of nursing curricula, and a significant part of Boards, deal with the decision-making process. we are expected to make decisions based on Standards of Practice within our Scope of Practice.

    Either we believe and accept that standards are a necessary function in life, or we do not. If we do accept this, weed, dudes, is not within the social standards, like it or not. If the social standards, "don't apply to me...", one is, by definition, displaying sociopathic tendencies, and one's overall judgement is unreliable.

    If, on the other hand, weed is, "just too good to give up...", one is displaying a dependent personality.

    In either case, one exhibits a pathology.

    You may not like this, you may choose not to agree, but there is no logical, reasoned argument in opposition.

    Some people like kiddie sex. Society says that is illegal. What makes any give vice more tenable than another? The answer, as alcohol definitively proves, is money. The Kennedy's were instrumental in the repeal of the 18th Amendment; NAMBLA was instrumental in mainstreaming the homosexual movement. NAMBLA was driven off-shore, and marginalized(their dream lives on, its just harder to gain acceptance); the Kennedys mainstreamed and politicized. Get some people who can make more money with legalized pot than illicit pot, and you'll see the fruition of the dream.

    If one is willing to risk livlihood, parental rights, home ownership and social liberty in the pursuit of a "recreation", it is necessary to carefully evaluate the validity of one's decisional processes.
    Last edit by Rob72 on Oct 28, '11
  13. by   Rob72
    Quote from xtxrn

    Scammers are scammers.... imho
    Generally, they eventually attain, "convict", but yes, there is a defined psychological profile, and yes, it is reliable.

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