Off the clock

  1. 0 Just an informal survey. What would you do if you knew one of your co workers was punching out, then coming back and doing her charting, all to avoid "getting in trouble" for too much overtime ?
    I know she is doing this. I know that my boss knows she is doing this.
    I work in a rehab unit night shift. 30 beds,2 nurses,12 hr shifts.
    I brought this up to my unit manager-she told me "don't worry about it."
    What would you do?
  2. Visit  jbecerra profile page

    About jbecerra

    Joined Dec '12; Posts: 17; Likes: 10.

    26 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  blackvans1234 profile page
    12
    I wouldn't worry about it.
    KimberlyRN89, JBudd, beckster_01, and 9 others like this.
  4. Visit  healthstar profile page
    0
    I don't see a problem with this at all. She's not getting paid to catch up on her charting, the manager is not losing anything! Unless this is an ongoing thing , and if it is , she might need some better tips on organization and time management!
  5. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    3
    Unfortunately I'm not sure there is much that you can do.

    Working off the clock is, however, a really bad practice....for reasons that other's have outlined on AN before. My only suggestion is to offer time management help so that she can get out on time--but, don't risk alienating her by being too pushy. If she is not receptive to help, well then, this is her problem. If she wants to work off the clock, that is her problem and she is the one taking the risks.
    Last edit by psu_213 on Mar 2, '13
  6. Visit  brithoover profile page
    3
    Why does this bother you?
    dudette10, Nascar nurse, and Sun0408 like this.
  7. Visit  Sun0408 profile page
    0
    I wouldn't worry about it...
  8. Visit  RNewbie profile page
    0
    I wouldn't worry about. Just curious, why is it bothering you?
  9. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    12
    It's illegal for an employer to require off-the-clock work in addition to the regular workday. If she isn't able to complete her required work on time, and she is required to get it done, they are required to pay her overtime.

    Now, if she isn't able to complete her job in the same time others are able to complete theirs, then that's another problem.
    nurse2033, Tait, applewhitern, and 9 others like this.
  10. Visit  hiddencatRN profile page
    0
    I'd only worry about it if your employer starts suggesting that all employees follow this practice. It's not something I'd ever do and wouldn't recommend it, but it's not really my business if a coworker of mine wants to work for free.
  11. Visit  noyesno profile page
    15
    When nurses work off the clock, either by working through their breaks or punching out and continuing to work, they do a disservice to all nurses. Employers will expect it and it promotes bad work environments.

    We must stand up for our unpaid time. Those who don't screw us all.
  12. Visit  RNKPCE profile page
    3
    I think nurses do do a disservice by working off the clock, is it doesn't let management know how much time it really takes to get work done. If doesn't seem to management that patient care hours need to be increased, they will keep added tasks.

    Recently with the changes in medicare reimbursement based on survey of patients post discharge our hospital has added extra things that we are required to do. There are only so many hours in a shift and if new things or expectations are added at some point something has to give, whether cutting corners or increasing overtime. Sometimes the only time charting can be done is when the next shift takes over the actual care.

    I see people do this at my work too. I think a lot of it is driven by fear or repercussions of management having to pay overtime.
    KimberlyRN89, 08RNGrad, and noyesno like this.
  13. Visit  anotherone profile page
    0
    i would mind my own business on this. not a cause worth being a martyr for
  14. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    4
    Quote from healthstar
    I don't see a problem with this at all. She's not getting paid to catch up on her charting, the manager is not losing anything! Unless this is an ongoing thing , and if it is , she might need some better tips on organization and time management!
    The problem is that it is illegal. If an employer has reason to believe an employee is working (and in this case it sounds like the boss is aware), they are required to compensate that employee for his/her time. And charting is working.
    Vespertinas, noyesno, SoldierNurse22, and 1 other like this.


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