Nursing is a Small World

  1. I want to remind people that nursing is a small world. It's never a good idea to burn a bridge with anyone. Whether they have a position of power over you at the moment, you might be surprised to see a person that you were rude and disrespectful of the pop up at the next place where you are applying.

    I can give you examples but I'll spare you the details. Take it from me, if you dissed me and gave me a hard time, when you show up at my second job to work, it might might very well get around as to some of your negative attributes, and how you burned your bridges with my managers at my other job.

    I've been on both sides of this equation. After all my years in nursing I realize what a tiny world it is and how one's reputation can precede oneself.
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   elkpark
    You are exactly right, and that's an important thing to remember.

    I recall being v. amused, when I was in a brick & mortar BSN completion program at the local state uni many years ago, by the behavior of the "generic," traditional BSN students (with whom we BSN-completion students were in some classes). They felt quite comfortable letting everyone know that they thought it was somehow inappropriate and unacceptable that they should have to be in classes with us (to the point of complaining bitterly and openly to the faculty about this), and they were extremely patronizing and condescending to us. You know, we're fresh and bright and smart, and we know everything worth knowing, and you all are just a bunch of tired, useless, old hags who couldn't possibly know anything useful (please note, I'm in no way suggesting that that description applies to nursing students in general; I'm just commenting on the behavior I observed from most of that specific group of nursing students in that specific setting). What they couldn't be bothered to find out before they got their panties in a wad about how terrible it was that they had to share a classroom with us, and how that was somehow damaging or diminishing their own education (I never really did figure that part out), was that many of the BSN-completion students were, in fact, the majority of the nurse managers from the various inpatient units of the local hospital system. That organization had decided to go to an "all-BSN" management model (this was many years ago), and all the ADN-prepared nurse managers were told that they had until X date to get a BSN, or else they'd have to step down from their NM positions. As a result, they all trooped down to the local uni and signed up for the BSN completion program. When we broke into small groups for the various classroom activities, we used to talk about how dumb and short-sighted this behavior was on the part of the students; and I would have loved to be a fly on the wall when that group of students graduated and started job-hunting -- and found themselves sitting across the desk, in interviews, from the same people they had been so nasty to so many times in class ...
    Last edit by elkpark on Sep 14
  4. by   caliotter3
    The nurse who never arrived less than 40 minutes late for day shift was thoroughly discussed when she tried to go back to a former employer when layoffs were implemented. Her poor employee behavior regarding punctuality prevented her from getting a job in at least one instance. Nursing is a small world permeated by talk amongst a defined set of nursing powers.
  5. by   Elfriede
    "Until you´ve lost your reputation, you never realize what a burden it was or what freedom really is." (Margaret Mitchell)
    To please everybody is a garantee for an ulcerated stomach and worse.
    Have respect but also demand respect.
    Last edit by Elfriede on Sep 14
  6. by   not.done.yet
    It doesn't extend just to nurses. At one point in time I was a measly little no-degree-having receptionist and then referral coordinator at a multi-surgeon's office. I was treated beyond horribly when I was suddenly let go from that facility with genuinely no cause given for my termination...I was never written up. I had never had complaints about performance. I was never late. In fact, I say without guile or self inflation that I was above average at my job. It was a political firing, something to do with the partnership entity that took over my role and their relationship with the surgeon group. It took them going through four individuals to replace me. There were ten surgeons to be taken care of and the job was high stress and high volume. My first "replacement" arrived to my office before I had even been told I no longer had a job. We were both very embarrassed. I was personally also humiliated. I was told it was for the best. They were right on that score.

    I will never know what really happened there...but I can tell you....I have come a dramatically long way since then and I have many advanced contacts in our community. I will never. EVER. refer a patient, colleague or business entity to deal with that particular surgery group. Ever.

    Don't just treat the big people or even people lateral to you well. Treat everyone well. You never know who they may become.
  7. by   Orion81
    Yes indeed. I'm convinced I had a job offer in the bag, as we were duscussing pay and benefits on a 3rd interview/meeting at a job I was SUPER excited about. Then....one of the interviewers asked if I had been a student of so and so (a nursing instructor friend of hers) during nursing school. I did NOT get along with that instructor, but had wonderful references from other teachers. Never heard from them again. Im convinced she talked to her friend, my previous instructor, and that she bad mouthed me.
  8. by   Orion81
    Quote from Orion81
    Yes indeed. I'm convinced I had a job offer in the bag, as we were duscussing pay and benefits on a 3rd interview/meeting at a job I was SUPER excited about. Then....one of the interviewers asked if I had been a student of so and so (a nursing instructor friend of hers) during nursing school. I did NOT get along with that instructor, but had wonderful references from other teachers. Never heard from them again. Im convinced she talked to her friend, my previous instructor, and that she bad mouthed me.
    Oh, and I basically told an old ADON to shove it before quitting (not literally.) I let them know I was quitting due to poor management. Fast forward a year, I go to interview for a position...Guess who the DON was.
  9. by   middleagednurse
    Once upon a time I floated to a facility where everyone hated the DON. I met her briefly and got the impression that she was not a nice person. I remembered her name
    A couple years later I am working in a different facility. She applies for a job there, I recognize the name, and into the shredder goes her application.
  10. by   SaltySarcasticSally
    So true!! I was an STNA and worked with an LPN j
    Who just treated me awful. I was meager then and didn't stand up for myself. Fast forward 8 years, I was then an LPN but was doing a peer interview. Imagine my surprise when I walked in and it was that nurse. I excused myself from the peer interview process, obviously I would be biased. She looked stunned and nervous once she saw me, it was all the satisfaction I needed lol. She didn't get the job but it wasn't due to me. I didn't disclose why I excused myself in detail until they picked someone else.

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