New nurses wanted. - page 2

by GrnTea 25,761 Views | 117 Comments

I have just read a post in a Nursing Specialties forum on Staff Development that makes reference to the need to recognize and nurture new nurses because the nursing-eat-their-young attitude is so widespread. I went to respond to... Read More


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    Are you kidding me? A Nicki Minaj quote? That is awful haha. But in all seriousness, I think the older ******* nurses only discourage the new ones because it makes them feel better. If they are still on the floor at age whatever 50 or 60. They have probably applied and not gotten a few management positions. Those are my thoughts after 5 months in as a new grad on a med surg floor.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Feb 14, '13 : Reason: TOS
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    Quote from nisteber
    Are you kidding me? A Nicki Minaj quote? That is awful haha.
    Do you not know the story of David and Goliath and the symbolism that quote evokes?
    nursel56, Esme12, imintrouble, and 1 other like this.
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    GrnTea, thank you so much for this! Having been on AN for just a few months, I find myself really struggling with discouragement, fairly regularly. It just seems so BAD out there, what with the no jobs and killer patient loads and vicious colleagues. Is this effort even worth the sacrifice? Nursing is not my dream job, my dream job is laying in bed with a book eating chocolate and potato chips without suffering any of those pesky consequences like weight gain or heart problems. It is a job I find fascinating, that I think I can do. Maybe I'm wrong - I won't know until I get there and try. But if I'm right, I can promise my future preceptor that I will watch closely, listen carefully, and think quickly to the best of my ability every day. I hope I get one who is as dedicated as you.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and GrnTea like this.
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    Quote from GrnTea
    I have just read a post in a Nursing Specialties forum on Staff Development that makes reference to the need to recognize and nurture new nurses because the nursing-eat-their-young attitude is so widespread. I went to respond to that but realized it might see more eyes here.

    As a clarification, it is critically important to know that someone who has a bad experience is likely to tell the story 25 times, while someone with a good one is likely to tell that story only 5 times. If therefore you apply this algorithm to the posts complaining of wretched treatment at the hands of old meanies who don't remember what it is to have a dreeeeaaaammmmm and passsssssiooonnnn, then you come out with a more realistic picture.

    Language is also critically important. Using words like, "It has been a chronic problem that has driven new nurses to leave nursing areas they had aspired to work in, and oftentimes caused new nurses to leave the nursing field entirely. No one knows how many talented people have been driven from the field of nursing, but it seems to be a widespread problem if all the articles and discussion in nursing forums is representative of most nursing environments" makes assumptions on facts not in evidence. "Seem(ing) to be a widespread problem" only works if you believe that "all the articles and discussion is representative of most nursing environments." (emphasis added here and below). Data, please. What's the source of that information?

    There are many threads and posts on AN that describe awesome experiences and workplaces, yet this assertion of "all the articles and discussion" clearly ignores them. There is ample evidence of older nurses here and at work supporting, teaching, and mentoring younger ones, on their own time, for free, late at night when they ought to be in bed, precisely because they want to nurture new nurses. We know they are our future, and we want them to be good. At the same time, there are multiple posts from new nurses that can bitterly dishearten the seasoned thoughtful practitioner, posts that indicate low levels of preparation, high levels of neediness and entitlement, unrealistic expectations of the realities of bedside work, and inability to adapt to the labor market.

    Those older, seasoned, and experienced practitioners express their dismay at these attitudes in many ways, from light-hearted banter to bitter and heartbroken rant. The resulting wails are instructive-- and demonstrative of a problem that has generally nothing whatsoever to do with young-eating. Perhaps some of those "many talented people" (in whose estimation? their own?) are "oftentimes" "driven" away by other factors than this seriously-overused and incredible (in the definition of the word, meaning, "not believable," not "rad, totally awesome, duuude") sound bite. Beware the shallow thinker who prefers sound bites to thoughtful analysis; do not be that person. We need better critical thinking in nursing. It can start here.

    Those of us older and more seasoned nurses know better than to discourage all new nurses from practice. We, better than they, have a clearer vision of being in those beds rather than beside them; we, better than they, have a larger perspective on the world of nursing care. We have already been new nurses. We have already been managers. We have already taken the responsibility of being charge nurses. We have been years at bedsides. We have already seen and participated in disasters, codes, deaths, family tragedies, fights, and labor actions. We know what it takes. We know we need more of us, as we age and leave because we are not able to do it anymore.

    We can be pardoned for being scared to death of those soi-disant (this means, in translation, self-described) "talented people" who are unable to (for lack of a better word) hack it at the bedside and do not understand, or try to understand, from whence we come. The perennially-aggrieved give us heartburn; we have no patience with them, we don't have time. We are scared of what will happen to us and our loved ones when the self-esteem movement leaves us with caregivers that need more validation from their patients than they have the fortitude to learn to give them.
    We welcome whole-heartedly, unreservedly, new nurses who are willing to put their education in its proper place, planning and providing competent care
    . We love the one who doesn't come in and say, "I'm just working here for a year so I can go to ICU and then go to CRNA / NP school." We want good nurses; we are willing to help new nurses who want to work wherever there is a need even if it's not their dreeeeaammmm job, and work hard, to grow. We want to work with people who don't have such a twitchy trigger finger, ready to go off with a bang over the least perceived slight. We want colleagues who believe this:

    Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. (~Ralph Waldo Emerson)

    Anyone who wants to be a nurse who has the strength of character to do that, we're ready for you. Are you ready for us? We are already here.
    I'll be referring to this post.

    My new favouite quote....

    Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. (~Ralph Waldo Emerson)
    Last edit by Esme12 on Feb 14, '13
    prnqday, poppycat, not.done.yet, and 2 others like this.
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    Wonderful well written article! Thank you! You put into words what I see everyday, especially where you imply we are scared of the future and that we don't need nurses who use everyday nursing as a quick stepping stone!
    poppycat and GrnTea like this.
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    Quote from nisteber
    Are you kidding me? A Nicki Minaj quote? That is awful haha. But in all seriousness, I think the older ******* nurses only discourage the new ones because it makes them feel better. If they are still on the floor at age whatever 50 or 60. They have probably applied and not gotten a few management positions. Those are my thoughts after 5 months in as a new grad on a med surg floor.

    This is parody or misplaced sophomoric humor, right? If not, I will disparage this because it deserves it.

    Five whole months, huh? Gee, whizzikers.
    nursel56, elkpark, nursetaminator, and 8 others like this.
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    This is a great article! It really makes quite a statement.
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    Quote from CheesePotato
    Holy hell! Where have you been hiding my whole life?This!This!!!So brilliant. So marvelous.Might I stalk you a little? Follow you around murmuring bits of poetry in your ear and spreading banquets of chocolate chip cookies before you? May I mention my cunning ability to sprinkle ekg dots (fresh out of flower petals....sorry. Plus, you know, seasonal and all that.) at your croc covered feet?And should you hear Peter Gabriel echo over your facility speakers, be assured that I am out on the lawn with a boom box (that's like a big ass iPod with speakers, kids) held aloft over my head.
    Geez Louise you crack me up!!
    morte, Esme12, and poppycat like this.
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    As a nursing student I take anything I get from my preceptors, I already feel as if I am in their way because they are there to care for their patients not teach me, so that being said I completely honor any little bit of attention I receive and I really appreciate it so very much. I will say though, most of my experiences have been filled with nurses who do teach me. Nurses are teachers afterall... sort of naturally happen. I once was paired with a nurse who flat out told me she wasn't there to teach me and she would not explain anything because she's not a good teachers and whatnot. I respect her choice. I would have plenty of other opportunities. Well she sure did explain things after all.

    So to all those nurses.... when you get a nursing student.... we really really appreciate and admire you because as you go on about your day I often question myself.... HOW on earth will I be able to do what so and so is doing.... all the time management, decisions, and interventions. So Thank You for taking time to teach us.
    GrnTea, CVmursenary, and poppycat like this.
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    Quote from GrnTea

    Anyone who wants to be a nurse who has the strength of character to do that, we're ready for you. Are you ready for us? We are already here.
    Thank you. As someone who went into nursing and thought of it as purely a career to support my family, I thought all through nursing school the only nursing I would ever do would be OB. I ended up getting hired on a cardiac unit with supportive older nurses who have harbored a nurturing learning environment for me and have realized that this is my niche 9 months into my career. I am starting to gain confidence in my abilities and I owe it to my co workers. They are awesome and have been totally accepting of ' the baby ' who is 23 on our unit ( me ) ...
    OCNRN63, GrnTea, and poppycat like this.


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