Need advice - bail on my accelerated BSN for an ADN?(long) - page 3

I am in semester 2 of a 4 semester accelerated BSN program. Right now I am kicking myself for not applying to the ADN program at my local CC. The more I learn, the more I feel like I am spinning my... Read More

  1. by   Tweety
    I'm with the "stick with it" vote. Unless your health and sanity are seriously in jeopardy, I would advise biting the bullet.

    If you quit now, you've lost a lot of time, and might have to take the full two years of an ADN. And whose to say you won't end up like me in 15 years wanting a BSN? Then that's two more years.

    Do what you have to do for your health, family and sanity. But if there's any way to find the strength one-day-at-a-time, then bite the bullet.

    ADN school isn't a piece of cake either. Remember ADN nurses take the same NCLEX and it's a tough, demanding cirriculim........only not accellerated.

    Good luck!
  2. by   anne74
    Why would you drop out? You're already in the middle of a program - finish!

    In the long run, the ADN program will take you longer - meaning a longer time when you're not in the working world making money. You'll have to be on a waiting list to even get in. Then you might have to re-take some classes, because often classes don't exactly translate. Plus, the ADN program will not be any easier physically, and it can't be much easier mentally.

    I finished an accelerated BSN program - it hits a peak in the middle of the program, and then the last semester is the easiest. You're just in the thick of it now. Yes, many of the administrative/management type classes are a bunch of crap (especially for me, since I already had a business background) but in this job market today, the BSN will help you in the long run.

    Plus, with a BSN you have more options for jobs. The hospital I work at now only hires BSNs. And, many hospitals are forcing ADN's to go back and get their BSN within a certain time frame, or they'll lose their job. And I would think working as an ADN, while going to school at night to earn a BSN would really be hard. Just working takes a lot out of you, and I'd hate to have classes on top of that. Just get it over with now!

    The moral of the story is, you'll finish faster with a higher degree if you stay in the accelerated program. Sure - you might initally have more school loans to pay back, but you'll earn more money with a BSN, and you'll be done sooner, so you'll start earning a real paycheck sooner. You could lose a lot of money when you're sitting idle waiting to get into an ADN program - not to mention it takes longer to finish.

    I think if you dropped out of the BSN program, you'd regret it. Hang in there - you'll be done soon. It just sucks right now.

    And as a side -- if you think school is physically and emotionally stressful - just wait until your first year of nursing. That is a whole new level of stress. I found myself often wishing for the easy days of being in school. Not to freak you out, but to manage your expectations. I thought getting through school was tough - but my first year of nursing absolutely rocked my world.
    Last edit by anne74 on Oct 8, '06
  3. by   piper_for_hire
    As a survivor of an accelerated program, I say stick with it! EVERY SINGLE DAY of the program I considered moving to a more normal (read: sane) option, but I am so glad that I didn't. Once you're done, you'll be glad that you toughed it out.

    -S
  4. by   anne74
    Also - I wanted to reiterate the comments about B's & C's. We used to always say in my program "C = RN". (We had the "getting a C will get you kicked out" rule too - so really you need B's.) But low B's are fine - just get through. And yes - one could argue that it's wrong to encourage people to get lower grades, but in the grand scheme of things, you do the real learning on the job - not so much in school. Don't kill yourself over grades. Grades don't make a good nurse. Experience and a good attitude make a good nurse.
  5. by   tencat
    By all means, finish! You're halfway there. It would set you back quite a bit to get on a waiting list for an ADN program. It seems that the trend is tending toward encouraging ADNs to get their BSN degree. I am an accelerated BSN survivor, and I'm glad I stuck it out. I have a hubby and a young child, so I sacrificed grades (B- was my friend!) for sanity. I'm really glad I did finish.
  6. by   DUECSON
    Fleur-de-lis, (WOW) you have gotten some great advice from everyone. Do what's in your heart, because you don't want to have any regrets when looking back on the choices you've made. I made choices regarding my career and schooling for others and resented them for the decisions I made. I'm thankful that i've forgiving myself and others for these decision. I've tried to get into an Acel. program at Auburn University with a 3.0 and the lowest gpa I heard was 3.6 last time. I've applied to several other programs. I agree with those who have said nursing school is hard to get in. With the shortage in nursing I would think it would be a little easier. I've had a Doctor to tell me that she would choose a "C" student that has a family than a straight "A" student without a family. She looked at it as a student with family can handle multiple tasks and be successful. Follow your heart and just do it. I believe that when it's all said and done you will make the right decision.
  7. by   fleur-de-lis
    you're right, duecson, great advice on this thread! thanks everyone.

    there is no way i would quit if i only knew for sure that i was on a waiting list. there are transfer protocols at this cc, and i would stick it out unless i had it in writing that i was in for the spring! i also did my pre-reqs at this cc, and they love me there, not that it would help me get in, but at least they know me.

    at the moment i am feeling like i at least need to check out the option, or else it will be nagging in the back of my mind til no end. most likely, i will find that either it would not work or there is no guarantee i will get in, then at least i can get it out of my head and focus on the task of getting thru the next 10 months!

    as for the stress of my first year of nursing - this terrifies me also! i have read all the horror stories here and i can just pray that whatever program i end up in prepares me well! which btw is one reason i started thinking about switching. i feel like we are getting all theory and very little of what we really need to be a nurse. but, last year's class is all employed and apparently doing well, so maybe we will get more hands on in the next few months. i do try to be very proactive in clinicals, as this forum taught me that it is what you make of it. perhaps this is why it is so exhausting, but i am determined to be a good nurse, so i plod on!

    thanks again everyone! :flowersfo
  8. by   piper_for_hire
    Totally agree that grades don't make a good nurse, but having good grades buy you the opportunity for advancement later. Who's to say that many years from now you won't decided to get a master's or a Ph.D. or something else that requires academic performance? Why deprive yourself of that opportunity. There are so many *INSANELY* good ICU nurses where I work that can't get into CRNA school because of a 2.6 GPA. Another one I know was rejected for a EdD (not sure that's right - the PhD in education) because of a crappy GPA. It doesn't make any sense, but the sad truth is that academia hold grades to be very important and you never know how your priorities may change one year from now or 20 years from now. C=RN, yes, but you make be hurting yourself in the long run.
  9. by   gauge14iv
    A 3.0 will get you in to just about anywhere but CRNA.

    As for the doctoral programs - they mostly look at your MS GPA.
  10. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from piper_for_hire
    Totally agree that grades don't make a good nurse, but having good grades buy you the opportunity for advancement later. Who's to say that many years from now you won't decided to get a master's or a Ph.D. or something else that requires academic performance? Why deprive yourself of that opportunity. There are so many *INSANELY* good ICU nurses where I work that can't get into CRNA school because of a 2.6 GPA. Another one I know was rejected for a EdD (not sure that's right - the PhD in education) because of a crappy GPA. It doesn't make any sense, but the sad truth is that academia hold grades to be very important and you never know how your priorities may change one year from now or 20 years from now. C=RN, yes, but you make be hurting yourself in the long run.
    Piper, she's indicated that she feels like she's going to crack now as it is. So you are telling her to push harder? It definately sounds like she needs a pressure release, not more pressure.
  11. by   pcicurn7
    Nursing school is hard. I think this is true regardless of whether you are in a BSN or ADN program. My apartment sounds much like you described, I have a husband who is often alone and must do for himself.

    I HAVE to keep my grades up because i know that the preceptorship program that I want to apply to will require my GPA to be at least a 3.5. So, keep your future plans in mind.

    If you are going to an ADN program because you think you'll have more time, I think you will find yourself mistaken. I'm in an ADN program, and i often hear "i have never had to work so hard in my life to get a C+"...However, $20K less in loans is a REALLY GOOD reason to switch over. So, find out what your priorities really are, then trust your instinct. But keep in mind that your lifestyle is probably not going to change much...just keep your eye on the big picture...graduation is not that far away, regardless of which program you choose. Good luck!
  12. by   piper_for_hire
    Well ... yes! When I struggled with the pressures of my accelerated program, my grades were headed in the wrong direction. I think she needs to decide which way to go and get more focused. All I can say is that it worked for me.

    -S

    Quote from multicollinarity
    Piper, she's indicated that she feels like she's going to crack now as it is. So you are telling her to push harder? It definately sounds like she needs a pressure release, not more pressure.
  13. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from piper_for_hire
    Well ... yes! When I struggled with the pressures of my accelerated program, my grades were headed in the wrong direction. I think she needs to decide which way to go and get more focused. All I can say is that it worked for me.

    -S
    I think you are projecting your own life onto her. Of course this is something we all do to varying degrees. You wanted to get in CRNA school. You needed near perfect grades. Fleur has indicated zero interest in CRNA school, and in fact says she isn't interested in graduate school.

    It seems to me that she should deal with the here-and-now challenge of getting thru her BSN program with her sanity in tact. Focusing on a narrow possibility rather than immediate real problems now, is odd to me.

    Adding pressure to someone screaming for less pressure usually doesn't equal success. Fact is, a solid 3.0 is perfectly respectible.

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