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romie

romie

Registered Nurse
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  1. romie

    Nurses with criminal background

    What exactly was you charge? Were you charged as an adult? what are the nursing rules in your state? Can you petition for either an expungment, sealing of the record or a pardon by the governor? Depending on your state clemendy may not me out of reach because I know in IL the ever forgiving Gov. grants over %60 of pardon requests. Good luck.
  2. romie

    To all "medical coverage is a privilege" folks:

    I used to use Allnurse.com as a touch stone for what nursing is, But some days I cannot believe some of the nasty crappy things that RNs say or feel about their patients. It makes me really sad. If you feel so entitled as an RN spend a couple more years in school, become an MD and then pass judgement. My patients love me because I care about them, not because I care how they are paying their bill.
  3. romie

    To all "medical coverage is a privilege" folks:

    Maybe in your suburb it's acceptable to be a discriminating RN, but in my home town of Chicago, you take care of people regardless of their ability to pay
  4. romie

    To all "medical coverage is a privilege" folks:

    I was getting report on a patient and the nurse mentioned that the patient (according to their suspicions) was homeless. My response was, "How is this relevant?" I actually don't give a ****** about how the medical bills are paid for . That is why I became a nurse instead of a physician. People ask me all of the time " why do you spend all of those years in school and you are ONLY a nurse and not a doctor? (I have over 10 years of higher education under my belt and I'm only an RN and proud of it). My response has been " I care about taking care of people and unfortunately being a physician these days is more about being a figure head and less about caring for people, so I am very happy being an RN." So I could give a s***** about how the bills are being paid, I am doing my job taking care of people in need. Let the nasty dirty money people do their job after I'm done bringing your mother back to life.
  5. romie

    To all "medical coverage is a privilege" folks:

    I was one of those unfortunate nurses who went to a liberal school which believed that basic health was a human right and that our practice as nurses should not at all be affected by how much insurance one or one doesn't have. Believe me, I have protested to the administration when we discharged patients home who could barely walk or even answer a phone to their homes yet let those patients with fancy insurance languish for days while we waited on them hand and foot because their insurance paid for it and they were perfectly capable of taking care of themselves and did not need nursing care. Healthcare is a right, not a gift. Those nurses who think otherwise are lucky to have their jobs.
  6. romie

    Im Pagan and a Hospice Nurse....

    Thank you so much. Conscise and to the point.
  7. romie

    Im Pagan and a Hospice Nurse....

    To simplify it. I'm at a staff meeting and there are 10 of us and we are there to discuss the care of our patients. It is custom or acceptable for the ten of us to breast feed during the meeting. However, Jenna, is a new staff member and either--refuses to breast feed, doesn't have any breast due to a mastectomy, prefers to use formula, prefers to breast feed in private or just for whatever reason does not engage in the group breast feeding. Now I like Jenna both as a person and as a nurse. She is a friend, is smart and witty and has helped me out on numerous occasions. If Jenna felt uncomfortable during the group breast feeding sessions, would I, as a friend and someone who cares about Jenna, participate? No. I wouldn't in solidarity to Jenna for whatever reason that she cannot or chooses not to participate, I will do what she is doing because I care about her as a coworker and as a friend.
  8. romie

    Im Pagan and a Hospice Nurse....

    The prayer in a work setting issue is a bit like breast feeding in public (but not quite). Both are normal healthy human activities. Both ideally are conducted in a setting in which everyone involved helps facilitates the process and no one feels victimized. Both have "the right" to be conducted in public (well, I wish this world would get a little bit more tolerant of nursing mothers and the babies that need their milk. We are mammals after all! We are classified as such because we nurse). In my own spiritual practices as an agnostic yogi, I prefer to do my full blown out expressions of spirituality in a setting that is conducive. I would be horrified if I went to a staff meeting and the other staff members had to do sun salutations or pranayama against their will. It demeans my own personal practice as a yogi and turns it into a spectacle instead of the special experience it is. However, I have been known from time to time, do a few mudras (hand yoga/ special hand signs) or silently chant to myself before a big test or a dreaded meeting. Actually, during a meeting, I can practice prana (breath control) discretely without anyone being aware. Its too bad that the OP's coworkers are not more sensitive to other people's spiritual practices and don't make their own spiritual practices more special by not including them in a meeting ( what I mean by that is that a work meeting is a relatively mundane time, not exactly the time to get a marriage proposal or announce the birth of your child, very unromantic, usually under fluorescent lighting and in uncomfortable chairs). A simple moment of silence will suffice. If they insist on a group prayer for whatever reason (my own spirituality is special by itself and does not need numbers, but I will say that a roomful of people breathing in unison is cool, but not something I need at work). Nursing moms should absolutely have the freedom to nourish their infants anywhere and anyway they please, just as any one of any faith should have the same freedom for themselves, but with that freedom comes responsibility and the need for tolerance. I wish I could nurse and if I could, I would probably only want to nurse in a zen like space so it would be a fantastic baby mommy mind melding experience, but I understand that infants have needs that are unscheduled and sometimes people feel the need to talk to God/Godess/Vishnu/ Yesu at the last minute. (Actually, the semantics of many of our phrases for last minute/ unprepared have a prayer element in them, if you think about it) Should nursing moms be confined to unsanitary and uncomfortable bathrooms and back alleys to perform nature's miracle--absolutely not. Should a nursing mom who is at home but has a few close friends over have to hide her baby's needs--certainly not, she should stay put in her comfy chair. I would hope though that she thinks ahead and assesses each situation but I wouldn't mind if it just so happens that she has to do it while I'm around. A nursing mom should use her time with her infant not to make a political/ social statement, but to nourish physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually both herself and her infant. If life happens and it happens to be in the middle of a parking lot, we'll just have to deal with it, but most nursing moms would rather be elsewhere when the need arises. Should prayer groups be hidden or confined, absolutely not, but they should position themselves in a way that demonstrates that they think ahead and assess each situation. If it is absolutely necessary, then go ahead, but if it is not, then I would hope that they would respect their god by not creating any casualties or collateral damage through their practices. Again, if they absolutely have to pray in a group with non participants in a room and it cant wait until a more appropriate time, then let it be a moment of silence, reflection, coffee break, bathroom break or something. Just as I have a last minute need to meditate (which I can do discretely, but I'm not ashamed to do publicly and if anyone asks I use the opportunity not to evangelize but to educate--I was discovered by a classmate doing a handstand before a test in a far off area of my school and I explained that the asana (sanskrit for pose) helps improve circulation to the brain. If I worked for an organization that 99 out of 100 people where yogis and we made a point of engaging in activities that made that one person feel alienated, I would feel so bad and personally not engage in my practices while that person was around just to support them. It would defeat the whole purpose of my spirituality if I made that person feel bad and alienated them. If I was one of 99 nursing moms sand we had a staff meeting and 99 out of 100 of us mothers nursed our babies during the staff meeting while one mother felt bad because she either did not have any babies to nurse or could not nurse, I would feel bad for her and out of respect for her take my nursing activities outside of the meeting because I would not want to make a coworker I cared about feel bad in anyway.
  9. romie

    New Grads having trouble finding a job in Chicago?

    I know as a former agency nurse that this is controversial because real good agency nurses are far and few. To be an actual traveler or agency nurse you have to be quick on your feet like nobody's business. Your patient is about to code and you can't get a PIXIS code so you have to be really creative or gracious. I don't think this new practice is desireable because it leaves new grads with uncertainty and discontinuity in their preceptorship, which is essential to nursing practice, but it is a sad reality and a way that some hospitals are saving money. When I was hired as a resource RN, the hospital said to me: We do not hire people for full time positions. We hire people through our resource nurse program and after your probationary period you can apply for a full time position. Unlike my first nursing job where I my benefits and PTO kicked on starting on day one. Very very sad. but that is where the money is.
  10. romie

    New Grads having trouble finding a job in Chicago?

    A lot of hosptials are using the BS line about the economy and the shortage of nurses to justify not hiring (don't get me started). Instead of applying for traditional full time positions new grads should be applying for resource or agency nursing positions. It's a new fad among some hospitals because then they can hire new grads without having to pay for benefits to see if they work out or not. Plus they don't have to guarantee hours if they don't like you.
  11. romie

    To all "medical coverage is a privilege" folks:

    Wow! I am completely awstruck by the positions and rationales that are taken by many of this forum. I have to keep checking my URL/ HTTP web bar to make sure that I am, in fact, on the allnurses.com forum. In my nursing school we were taught that healthcare was not a privilege but a matter of social justice. People have a RIGHT to healthcare. While I am acting as an RN and providing healthcare I don't give a rats a.. who is paying the bill, but that it is my duty not only as a licensed healthcare professional to provide that person with expert healthcare, but it is also my duty as an ethical human being to help them. In nursing school we spent a whole semester (wow, one semester, which included weekly journal type papers and one research paper) on ethics. I'm probably a little biased because my nursing school is one of the primary sponsors and advocates of Emergency USA, which is a little like Doctors without Borders but has a nursing focus and we had regular speakers from the program. Emergency USA builds and sustains healthcare clinics in war torn regions and the latest press release from Emergency USA was a letter urging NATO to stop their barricade and open a humanitarian corridor to let injured civilians from the recent Helmand, Afghanistan bombing through to receive the free healthcare they need from Emergency USA nurses and physicians. And I'm not some whimsical new grad idealist. I have worked two jobs as an RN at the same time. The first job paid my bills, the second job I made enough to just cover the medical benefits for myself and my spouse. I paid over 800 a month for health insurance and I'm still stuck with the bills and getting reported by collection agencies because I refuse to act like a bank and provide a temporary loan to the insurance company until they can get their act together to figure out who is suppose to pay what. Obviously this free market thing isn't working. We are going to pay for it collectively whether we like it or not. Wouldn't it be more cost effective to pay for prevention and encouraging healthy behaviors. Our government doesn't think so. Our government won't pay a specially certified diabetes educator nurse 100 a week to counsel and monitor someone but will gladly pay 50,000 or more to amputate their leg and the ensuing aftercare. The integrity of any culture or society is based on how well the weakest members are cared for. Do we want our society to be remembered for the Desperate Housewives of Atlanta, Dances with the Bizarres, Flee or for the quality of care and respect that your premature infant or elderly aunt received in their most desperate times of need? I really need to avoid this topic because it really burns my soup.
  12. Instead of getting caught up in peripheral issues, we should be ripping apart the cover letter instead. That cover letter better shine shine shine! When I was completing nursing school I applied for a Graduate Nurse Internship type program at a very prestigious hospital. Half of my cohort of 38 applied and we all had degrees in outside fields, some of us even had PhDs in biology and were lawyers. Anyway, only 1 person in my entire cohort was offered a position in this program so I keep asking myself: who are they looking for--the holy reincarnation of Clara or Florence? Point is, your cover letter is only only the beginning. The worst is yet to come. Read Brenner's theory on novice to expert and put some of her stuff in your letter and interview. That may help. Have faith though because getting into these special new grad internship type programs are way harder than getting a regular nursing job, so don't be discouraged.
  13. I'm going to completely confuse and contradict myself here: Definitely consider the words and phrases used in the description of the position and in the description of the program. One resume, cover letter advice resource I read once suggested highlighting these key words and phrases and incorporating them into resume and cover letter because these days many organizations use computer programs to assist them in sorting through applications. Imagine the organization is using a google type search program and you want to make sure that your letter and resume are on the top page of results. A very basic example is this: if the source uses the word hypertension, don't use the phrase high blood pressure, but hypertension instead. That being said, how can you avoid the trap of being disingenuous? I don't have the answer but I think it goes back to our writing 101 lessons on paraphrasing. Its of utmost importance however, that your cover letter reflects your personal style and shows the person reading it a little bit about yourself as a unique individual. You certainly seem accomplished and ambitious but everyone else is also going to have as many equally good accomplishments. The difference is that you are you and people like to hire people that they like.
  14. I agree completely with Patti RN that any cover letter, in fact any letter that you will ever write, should be your own words. In my own critique I offer suggestions and give then give a specific example to illustrate and clarify that suggestion. I trust woahmelly and any college educated individual to know that an example or illustration should not be utilized verbatim. That is basic plagiarism. Any "How To" book, seminars and classes I have ever taken have used specific examples to enhance understanding of a point. Most resume books will have sample resumes--they are not intended to be copied verbatim. Disclaimer: The following examples are illustrations intended to clarify and promote understanding of concepts. Any document that is submitted by the applicant is to be their own work. Any advice or specific examples, whether obtained from this forum, any other internet source, book or other source should be assessed by the individual applicant and utilized at their own discretion. This disclaimer applies to any application, resume, cover letter, interview or other document submitted by the applicant that is intended to be their own work.
  15. Great advice everyone. If I may, here are some additional pointers: The first paragraph needs a lot of help. It should in four sentences or less state the exact title of the position you are applying for (which you only sort of did), state who you are (which you didn't) and serve as an introduction to all of the fabulous skills, knowledge and accomplishments that you detail further in your letter. A possible rewrite would be: Greetings! I am applying for Graduate Nurse Intern position with the XXX Medical Center New Graduate Program (find out the exact name of the program and the exact title you will have during the new graduate program). I am a nursing student at xxxx college/school of nursing and will be eligible to sit for the NCLEX this spring of 2012. (The last sentence should say something very general about your skills/ knowledge/ competencies that are aligned with the mission statement and/or "job description" of what they are seeking in a good candidate). Give a date that you will be eligible for the NCLEX as this will determine which cohort you will be considered for--the manager needs to know if you are going to sit for the NCLEX this month or this year even. If you have your ATT and have already scheduled your date, either give that date or the period. "I will be taking the NCLEX at the begining of June 2012." Look carefully at the "job description". Are they seeking a candidate with excellent oral and written communication skills? If so, state that and give a brief clinical example of your excellent oral and written communication. This is a great way to sneak in your involvement in the community too. "I recently served as a presenter for the xxxx Red Cross chapter where I am a member of the Disaster Action Team." Are they looking for a good team player or a good leader? State that you are and then give a brief example. It's challenging to keep it short and concise but stating testifying that your have superior group member interpersonal skills as evidenced by a specific example through your medical reserve corp participation is much more interesting than simply stating that you are a member of the medical reserve corp. Kills two birds with one stone and tells a story that HR person reviewing hundreds of applications would be refreshed to read.
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