motorcycle accidents - page 3

Hi, I would really appreciate it if anyone could share stories of motorcycle accidents, Im thinking of getting a motorcycle, but might reconsider. Thanks... Read More

  1. by   zenman
    I saw a pic of a guy, alive and well, except that his face below his eyes was scraped off.
  2. by   fotografe
    I am not a rider, but my brother and sister are. Here's my sister's story.

    Riding in a small Midwestern town, in full uniform (a deputy sheriff), her husband, also a deputy, in a squad car behind her. Came to an intersection where the cross road had a stop sign. SHe went into intersection. Then a car, driven by a 16 y/o son of a car insurance salesman, licensed only 2 weeks, does not stop, hits her, and does not hit the brakes. The tangle of car and bike came to a rest because her bike was ground into the pavement.

    She spent 3 months in the hospital with a severe head injury (no helmet) which has left her with seizures for about a year, a shattered leg, which now contains a permanent metal rod and one leg shorter than the other, and a spinal injury requiring surgery to fuse vertebra. The kicker was the kid is underinsured. Not enough money to cover all treatment, so her insurance had to kick in.

    She still rides, although now always with a helmet. For pleasure she rides dirtbikes. Rarely rides for transportation any more. Her reason is that it is not her ability that affects safety, but the ability of all the other drivers on the road, and most of them have little ability.

    As someone else mentioned, it is a personal choice. If it gives you pleasure to ride, and the risks outweigh the benefits, ride on. Skydiving, mountain climbing, heck even more mundane activities like skiing and sledding are sometimes fatal too. Gotta figure what makes you happy in your skin and do what you want.
    Last edit by fotografe on Jan 3, '05
  3. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    My Mom, who was an RN for over 50 years and worked ICU/CCU 15 of her last 20, used to call them "donorcycles."

    I think it's like anything with inherent risk. Wear your helmet, be extra-extra cautious on the road, don't behave stupidly while riding and make sure your life insurance is high and paid up.
  4. by   SusanJean
    I do believe it is personal choice.

    I do know they are called "donor cycles".
    After working in an ER I no longer ride one and ALWAYS were a seat belt in my car (from 20 plus yrs ago.) I still ride horses tho...

    A family friend was enjoying his motorcycle (had been riding safely for 10's of yrs) and out of no where a deer collided w/ him. Weeks and weeks in the hospital -- he did survive. As careful as he was, the deer was not... His wife and young daughter spent several weeks wondering if he was going to survive. He no longer rides.
  5. by   meesa214
    In the end, it's purely your choice. I don't know what type of bike you're thinking about...Harley-type bike or sportbike...but just don't be one of those a**holes speeding along at 150mph on a crotch-rocket, normally with their friends. I have no respect for them whatsoever. I was very happy to read that people on here take their sportbikes to the track to do this!
  6. by   renerian
    My one brother broke both legs, my other brother broke his arm, leg, pelvis and my cousin broke his arms, legs, and pelvis...all in motorcycle accidents where the other drivers hit them as they did not see the bike.

    Hubby got a vintage one from his son for Christmas and there is no talking him out of using it and you won't catch me on it.

    renerian :uhoh21:
  7. by   Thunderwolf
    Reconsider. TraumaRUs makes the best point. It happens more frequently than we'd like to know.
  8. by   NurseGuy_in_06
    Quote from Oregon Runner
    Hi, I would really appreciate it if anyone could share stories of motorcycle accidents, Im thinking of getting a motorcycle, but might reconsider. Thanks
    Why do you want stories of motorcycle accidents? After re-reading some of the posts I have to agree that you are trying to talk yourself out of riding. A scared motorcycle rider is a danger to everyone on the road. You need confidence to successfully ride a motorcycle in traffic. Regardless of the scare stories posted here, if you want to ride then learn how to ride properly and ride safely. And if you are scared DON"T DO IT!
  9. by   NurseGuy_in_06
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Reconsider please. They are death on the road. I'm an ER RN in a large level one trauma center. My favorite story is of a guy who lost control of his motorcycle on gravel and ended up going head over the handlebars, landing on pavement on his head. He's brought into the trauma bay and we start cutting off his clothes while his brains are oozing out his ears and nose. We get to his t-shirt and its an advertisement for ABATE! It was very sad telling the family that he was dead - especially his young children.
    I just checked the USDOT site that listed motorcycle accident statistics. For the record: most motorcycle fatalities involve a drunk motorcycle rider, a large percentage involve a rider with no valid license, a large percentage involve a speeding motorcycle, and statistically there are FEWER fatalities when a motorcycle rider has an accident and does NOT wear a helmet. Why? Most riders are extra careful when riding without a helmet. I know I am. So based on these statistics tell me who is more dangerous, a drunk inexperienced motorcycle rider or a drunk inexperienced automobile driver.
  10. by   zambezi
    Quote from Kabin
    I was planning to go to Laguna next year, but my class schedules are up in the air. Last time I was at the WSC/AMA Laguna races was about 1997. The MotoGP return should be a blast!

    It's surprising how many docs ride bikes. I met a ER doc at a track day and years later saw him in his element on a trauma program on Discovery Health channel. He rode an R6 Yamaha. I also met an older plastic surgeon at a track day, he rode a CBR600 sport bike. I knew a double boarded psychiatrist-neurologist that owned about 7 sport bikes at the time. The track group I rode with also had a orthopedic surgeon that use to race with a Ducati AMA team in the mid 90's. He also happened to do work on some of the racers. He'd fly in while his driver drove his semi truck trailer to the track.
    Hijacking the thread for a minute:

    You have to try to go to Laguna this year!!! IT should be fantastic! I was there in 97 (have been there the last 6 years or so...I can wait to see MotoGP...My husband and I both ride ducatis...but most of the people I work with are more into harley/crusier type bikes....there are a couple of us sportbike fans...the docs I know all have a selection to choose from...

    To the OP....as others have mentioned, there are all kinds of stories...the reality of it is, every time you ride there is a risk...but there are also benefits...it is up to you to weigh those....I am around riders all the time...most ride on the street, many also on the track. Everyone that I know rides for a different reason but most are passionate about it....If you choose to ride...be prepared, be a defensive rider...wear the right gear (it seems expensive but is cheaper than your hospital bill potentially will be), bet comfortable on your bike, take the safety schools, and later take a school on a track, there are many to choose from (again pm me if you want suggestions on which safety track school to take!). Good luck...riding is a blast. As with most things, it is a personal decision that you have to make!
  11. by   pod184
    Life itself is a calculated risk. Motorcycling can be a dangerous activity, but so can pretty much anything else. Over 100 people per year die of bathtub related burns, yet you don't have such a visceral response to this sort of injury.
    You can't be afraid of everything in life. You have to be aware of the risks, aware of what can go wrong, and aware of how best to minimize the risks. I ride. I wear a helmet. I also wear a riding jacket with armor. I can recognise that riding a motorcycle can be dangerous. I can also recognize that most accidents have additional factors such as alcohol, excessive speed and rider inexperience.
  12. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Quote from pod184
    Life itself is a calculated risk. Motorcycling can be a dangerous activity, but so can pretty much anything else. Over 100 people per year die of bathtub related burns, yet you don't have such a visceral response to this sort of injury.
    You can't be afraid of everything in life. You have to be aware of the risks, aware of what can go wrong, and aware of how best to minimize the risks. I ride. I wear a helmet. I also wear a riding jacket with armor. I can recognise that riding a motorcycle can be dangerous. I can also recognize that most accidents have additional factors such as alcohol, excessive speed and rider inexperience.
    Yes, yes and yes.

    What pod184 said.
  13. by   Oregon Runner
    Wow, thanks for all the responses.
    I am planning on getting a sportbike. I didn't star this thread to try and convince myself not to get one. I absoluty love motorcycles, but my parents are dead set against them. Ive read as many statistics as i can get a hold of, As one poster said, most of the deaths are from inexperienced riders, who are often drunk, and not wearing helmets. When i drive my car, it' not my driving im worried about, its all the other people who may not be paying attention and hit ME that worries me. on a bike though, you probably wouldnt get a second chance after being hit. So, I think i may get a sprt bike for track use only, then there's no cars coming out of no where to get ya. Thanks again for all your thoughts, GO MotoGP !!!! Rossi needs someone to challenge him next season, Oh, so are there many tracks in oregon where you can ride?

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