Male vs. Female - page 5

male vs. female......i don't see any reason why a male nurse should start a foley on a female pt. unless it is an emergency. i have no problem with a female coworker asking me to cath. their male... Read More

  1. by   teeituptom
    All thoughts count and are important
    I think
  2. by   Tweety
    Quote from TweetiePieRN
    In the dept I work at the hospital....THERE ARE NO MALE RNS! So if a male patient were to need a catheter...does that mean we are supposed to find a male to perform the catheterization...Does a male housekeeper count? Yes, our society is litigious, but to expect a male to cath a male...how is my dept expected to handle this? Just a thought.

    Being the hypocrit that I am I feel there's no real need to change how you guys are doing things. Are the male patients highly uncomfortable with female nurses, is there a history where you work of males charging females with sexual assault?
  3. by   Rozhinitsy
    Unfortunately the female nurses are not allowed to catherise men on my ward even though it's an acute medical ward. But both sexes can catherise women, although most male nurses will ask a female nurse to do it for him if they are available.
  4. by   Energizer Bunny
    Quote from Rozhinitsy
    Unfortunately the female nurses are not allowed to catherise men on my ward even though it's an acute medical ward. But both sexes can catherise women, although most male nurses will ask a female nurse to do it for him if they are available.
    This seems a little backward, not to mention sexist, to me!
  5. by   JustaMaleRN
    the first hospital i worked for was a nun-run catholic hospital. we were under direct instructions that male nurses were not to be placing foleys on female patients. however, we had to be signed off on them. fortunately i worked in the e.r., and we had numerous n.h. patients who were post cva and unaware of their surroundings. i got my requisite number done, and have not done any since. i have done a total of 5 female caths in 8 years. i let my female counterparts know from the start that this is not something i am expert or experienced at, and ask them for assistance. i just pick up the slack for them while they are helping me. no problems so far!

    dave

    Quote from carlls
    male vs. female......i don't see any reason why a male nurse should start a foley on a female pt. unless it is an emergency. i have no problem with a female coworker asking me to cath. their male pt.'s. i will always see if a female coworker will perform this procedure on my female pt's. i am about to graduate in may with my adn. i just want to get the general census about this.
    03.29.04
    thank you all for your comments. this was a class assignment and i wanted to start a little controversy so i would get some response. for the most part i really like the professional replies. i look forward to becoming an rn and agree with all of you that commented its up to the patient, and it's all about the patient. one of my main reasons for becoming a nurse is the holistic care we provide. god bless you all.
  6. by   JustaMaleRN
    Lawyers are fine, on a vent, with an NG Tube, and pavuloned. Maybe a little anxiolysis.

    Just Kidding!

    Dave


    Quote from teeituptom
    Thank you Agnus

    I have dealt with lawyers before

    and I fear what they represent

    which is misery

    no such thing as a good lawyer who is still breathing
  7. by   TimmyinCanada
    It is sad to see how many of us are rightly scared of losing our licences. It is shameful that we work in such a volitile arena. I am a male RPN in Ontario, I am also almost into my Pregrad for my RN's (16 weeks left) Wooooohoooo :hatparty: But I never even thought that following protocol, asking for an informed consent and receiving that from the patient could still lead to this quandary. I for one have cathed more then my fair share of females, most in the 80's but I do what I need to do, for who I need to do it for, simply put. Why are we still in contention as to why a male versus a female should cath who? I mean were all NURSES, aren't we?
  8. by   Dayray
    This topic has been revisited quite often. I have to say I am very glad to see that peoples perceptions seem to be evolving. When I first started visiting this board threads like this were full of backward thinking and some very ugly male stereotypes. Now although not everyone agrees and although there is still some old fashion type things said it's not nearly as ugly or hostile.

    Many of you know I am a male RN who works L&D. I cath patients nearly on a daily basis and rarely have another nurse present. I also do cervical exams. Sometimes I ask for another Rn to come along if I get a strange vibe but it's rare.

    In response to the original post: if you are really going to examine this issue you have to look at it from 2 perspectives.

    The view of the patient vs the view of nurses (not just the nurse doing the procedure but his peers)

    Some patients would be uncomfortable with a male providing this care I can tell you that it's rare but that it does happen (has happened to me once in the last year, it did happen a bit more often the year before that) for the most part patients are uncomfortable with the procedure and the gender of their nurse does little to help or hinder this.

    As for the nurses point of view, If your not used to doing it it can be very stressful. As a nursing student I remember my first young female patient (20yo). I was so scared of her. Too make things even worse she had a little crush on me and asked me out on a date. I had a very good instructor that made me keep the assignment and told me "you don't have to feel uncomfortable just because your a boy".

    Over time I was able to overcome my feelings of apprehension but the views of my peers made this harder and caused me allot of problems. Some nurses feel that it's wrong and they made this issue 100 times more complicated then it needs to be.

    What it comes down to is the patients wishes and if they say they want a female then they get one. If the patient feels that way they will tell you. I don't ask them because to do so would be inferring that there was something wrong with male care providers.

    I'm not oblivious to the potential for false accusations. I accept a certain amount of risk simply because I am male but I do a few things to minimize this.

    I always do explain the procedure to the patient, I don't make a big production of it but I always make sure they consent.

    I always do things the exact same way, which is the way I was taught in school yeah I even test the balloon.

    most importantly I make sure my patient knows I care about them. Maybe that sounds a little corny but I think it matters. I am convinced that a strong nurse patient relationship decreases the chance of litigation.

    I don't fault guys on other floors who don't wish to accept a risk by placing a cath in a female. I just hope that people realize it's a choice not a requirement. I also understand that L&D is a different world and to some extent this issue is easier for me because when I introduce myself the patient understands that Ill be performing these types of procedures.

    I think a good class project would be to examine why attitudes toward male nurses are diffent then attitudes toward female nurses. I could make this post an hour long so ill just stop here.
  9. by   Dayray
    I don't understand why we continue to perpetrate this myth that men are animals ready to pounce on the first exposed female they see.
    NurseRachet! I thank you for that observation.
  10. by   TimmyinCanada
    Quote from Dayray
    NurseRachet! I thank you for that observation.

    Yes no kidding, whats the hell is wrong with this picture. I am so perturbed by this "Great Divide". I took my training, met the boards, did my clinicals, got the crap beaten outta me by little old ladies.....lol.... and yet this quandary, jeesh, and you wonder why men aren't flocking to nursing. This perpetuation I think is being honoured, bred by the ladies, frankly I care less who I cath, if they need it, the order exists, they consent........Then in I go with a foley tray, and "2" foleys in case I miss........Just my thoughts......Thanks for listening......... :wavey
  11. by   PedsNurse1981
    I work on a peds floor and have only been in the situation one time where I had a teenage boy who needed to be cathed. I know this is a very difficult time for them, so I asked a male coworker to do the cath. Being so close to the ages of the patients makes both the patient and myself a bit uncomfortable, but I would cath a male if there was no alternative.
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from Dayray
    I also understand that L&D is a different world and to some extent this issue is easier for me because when I introduce myself the patient understands that Ill be performing these types of procedures.

    Excellent point. Most ladies go into labor and delivery with the idea that that time is not the time to be modest. That the general public and nurses themselves don't look upon males as equal in all areas is indeed something that we can go on and on and on about.

    (For me personally, I'd let anyone cath me. But I would definately be more comfortable with a male. But when you think about it, it's a task, no different than starting an IV, it just takes a professional. )
  13. by   teeituptom
    Isnt it the pts comfort level what its all about

    and also, I have seen several males who have been nailed by women for cathing them. even for doing ekgs on them and exposing them just a little.

    Sorry thats one hassle I dont need

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