Major venting about some CNA's - page 20

First, let me say that I am not venting against all CNA's or even most...I've been one myself. I know how hard they work. I applaude the good ones. My problem is the majority of the ones at... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    our doctors do Michelle, so no issue on nursing as far as I am concerned. I have time to do NURSING duties this way. Works for me. Please read my whole post if you are gonna quote and quit quoting out of context. Thanks!

    And before I forget, those that are "forced" to escort smokers outside, who handles the nursing needs of your OTHER patients and their families while you are doing this? How do you think they would feel if they had to wait for something they need while you are out there, promoting a very unhealthy behavior as a health care worker? Just food for thought.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Dec 31, '02
  2. by   mattsmom81
    Soo...we should let the chest pain patient puff away while we're starting a Nitro drip to head off a heart attack?

    And let the acidotic COPD patient have one last drag before we intubate?

    Yeah, they're nervous and scared and want a cig but we have to use common sense, prioritize, 'critically think' (altho I hate buzzwords like this... LOL)

    LTC is governed by patient rights regulations and allows for residents to smoke... but acute care is different. The patient comes to us in acute distress ...then asks us to feed the addiction that is aggravating their cardiac or lung condition...it's up to us to say no. They are addicted but sick and we have to try and get them through the crisis.

    From me smokers will get some Xanax and a patch per protocol... but NO WAY will they get a cigarette in my ICU. For me to allow that would be grounds for malpractice IMO.

    It always amazes me after we have saved a life to hear the cardiopulmonary patient say "I can't wait to have a cigarette".
    All the teaching in the world and the awful experience of intubation and vent weaning, or a heart attack still won't win over the addiction. Lungers especially may well be back within 6 months...and may not survive the next round. It is very frustrating to see this, and to watch their loved ones suffer watching such self destructive behavior.
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by mattsmom81
    Soo...we should let the chest pain patient puff away while we're starting a Nitro drip to head off a heart attack?

    And let the acidotic COPD patient have one last drag before we intubate?

    Yeah, they're nervous and scared and want a cig but we have to use common sense, prioritize, 'critically think' (altho I hate buzzwords like this... LOL)

    LTC is governed by patient rights regulations and allows for residents to smoke... but acute care is different. The patient comes to us in acute distress ...then asks us to feed the addiction that is aggravating their cardiac or lung condition...it's up to us to say no. They are addicted but sick and we have to try and get them through the crisis.

    From me smokers will get some Xanax and a patch per protocol... but NO WAY will they get a cigarette in my ICU. For me to allow that would be grounds for malpractice IMO.

    It always amazes me after we have saved a life to hear the cardiopulmonary patient say "I can't wait to have a cigarette".
    All the teaching in the world and the awful experience of intubation and vent weaning, or a heart attack still won't win over the addiction. Lungers especially may well be back within 6 months...and may not survive the next round. It is very frustrating to see this, and to watch their loved ones suffer watching such self destructive behavior.
    I agree, Mattsmom. Totally.
  4. by   MishlB
    I was thinking more along the lines of less critical........
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    ............ we are stretched thin in personnel, as it is. And while we may not be CCU/ICU, we don't have any more time or desire to do this than mattsmom does, where I work. It's enough I/my coworkers get stuck watching their babies for them while they go down to smoke.That is as far as I will go to support that habit, period. Oh, and before you ask, NO WE DO NOT HAVE A WELL BABY NURSERY. Our hospital is following the baby-friendly model (not yet designated as "baby-friendly" by WHO), which if you don't know, mandates the neonates who are healthy room-in w/their mothers 24/7. So yes, it IS an added burden when these babies come out to the nurse's station, cause that means we have to stay around to watch them. I think that is more than enough for us to do, don't you? At least at the other hospital where I work, it's not an issue due to the strict nonsmoking on grounds policy.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Dec 31, '02
  6. by   BBFRN
    I'm sorry to say it, but even as a moderate smoker myself, I don't think that anyone who isn't a smoker should be forced to take a patient out for smoke breaks. I don't feel that it's fair to ask anyone to be exposed to someone elses smoke if it bothers them. And I support any CNA or Nurse who feels it goes against their obligation to the patient to take them out to smoke. It is a habit- not a right. Please don't flame me for this- I just thought I would pose an opinion as a smoker.
  7. by   Q.
    O/T but I think OB should be considered a critical care area anyway...
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by Susy K
    O/T but I think OB should be considered a critical care area anyway...
    Well, Suzy at least L and D should be IMO. But since labor/delivery are essentially HEALTHY processes, (til we interfere, oftentimes, or nature turns on her famous dime), the powers-that-be will NEVER buy off on that concept. Being that I work LDRP, I do it all in a given shift, (even GYN's when we are busy enough)---- so smokers have to wait til a family member can take em down, or they are able to go themselves. I mean, show a new mommie how to breastfeed for the first time, or help a 15-year-old girl through a diffcult labor---- or escort a smoker downstairs? Hmmmmmm not a difficult choice to me. :kiss
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Dec 31, '02
  9. by   mario_ragucci
    To make a big deal about a person's smoking can make you a fool. See, people smoke for habit and pleasure. Shouldn't make such a big deal about it because it's legal, and heavily advertised. Remember how heavily America was bombed with cigarette advertising - don't be dumb! Health dangers of smoking is not an issue - PEOPLE reactto what they see. Don't allow others to control your "chee" as cigarette advertising did with so many.
    Look - just let the older folks smoke'em if they gottem, as part of their American culture (don't deny it). Many hospital PT's have learned too painfully self-rightous staff are for the birds. Just use your sensible judgement and have a little heart. Stop making smoking a dad-burn plank to start complaining. Judge not, lest ye be judged, for the judgement ye judge, ye shall be judged. And just be cool :-)
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci
    Judge not, lest ye be judged, for the judgement ye judge, ye shall be judged. And just be cool :-)
    Umm who's judging? I refuse to compromise patient care to support a habit, period. What anyone does to his/her lungs ON THEIR TIME is up to them. But when it's on MY time, it's up to me not to indulge them when other priorities beckon, Mario.
  11. by   emily_mom
    I had a girl last week that didn't even have the placenta delivered and wanted to go outside and smoke. Umm, wouldn't you like to maybe finish delivery and see if we can resuscitate your child before you go toke? I am a smoker, but I don't smoke at work. And, I sure as hell don't take anyone outside to smoke. Your habit? You support it. Family members are real impressed when the new mom whines b/c of nicotine. Um, if you had quit during the pregnancy, you shouldn't be begging for one before you get out of the stirrups. Makes family members wonder...

    Kristy
  12. by   mario_ragucci
    I'm feeling a sense of compassion if a person smokes and then gets their freedom removed, like with an illness or old age. Maybe 30 years from now, I might can see this control. For now, we should be still enjoying the "good old days" since additudes on smoking shift.
    At a hospital, accompanying a PT to smoke is rare. RN's have to give permission, right? The handful of sniffs and LTC places I been as a CNA I observed only the able people could smoke...able to get out the door. It's okay to loose privilages as you become older, or disabled.
    Once I gave a cigarette to a PT when I was very new, and I swore I would never do that again. Imagine if that PT got ill or died from it? Here I go making my own big deal, lol. I'm sorry :-(
  13. by   Sleepyeyes
    i worked in a nursing home in which a resident on pain meds lit up in her room and set her bed on fire. happily no one was hurt because the smoke alarms went off and we were able to evac before the roommate's O2 blew.... which is why most NH's are smoke-free now.... ins co's just don't wanna chance it.

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