Letting CNA pass your meds, bad idea? - page 9

I fill the cups and check for all interactions and whatnot, but anyone have any negative experiences or can think of any possible neg exp with this? Thanks... Read More

  1. by   pagandeva2000
    [QUOTE=lmaldo]
    Quote from goingnuts

    You are so right! We are very fortunate to have the equipment in the hospitals, as well as the access to doctors and specialists. That is actually one of the main reasons I chose hospital care, as opposed to Nursing Homes. I have to admit that under your situation, your environment forces you to defend your license to the point it does come first.

    With the shortage of nurses today, it might be worth it for you to perhaps explore acute care - that way you can be a nurse for the original reason you probably became one. It is well worth it!
    It is a shame that many nursing homes do create this atmosphere. I am a new LPN working in a hospital, and one of my friends told me that when she first became a nurse, she worked for an agency that sent her to a nursing home. She went there and found that she had to medicate 40 patients by herself. Most of the patients were demented and didn't have ID bands on, no photo ID on the MAR, and she said that by 5:00 pm, she was still administering morning meds (she was supposed to leave by 3:00). She went to the RN and asked her what to do and she stated that the RN told her "Do what you have to do". By the end of such a horrendous day, while she was trying to assure patient safety, she realized that she had to then resort to first protecting her license, so, according to her, she wasted the narcartics, signed for them as well as the other medications, went home, and never returned to any nursing home again in her career. Was she wrong? Maybe yes, but this was an impossible assignment, especially for a new LPN. This made the decision to me not to ever work at a nursing home. I didn't judge her. She, or others in such a situation may have resulted to getting anyone...even a housekeeper to administer medications. Based on knowing that many (not all), but MANY nursing homes do things like this to nurses and if the facility is not assuring that their patients are safe, it is hard for the nurse to do the continue to advocate. Nurses leave, because we did work hard to become LPN/RNs and to possibly lose a license because of a facility that is asking for literal blood would be insane. I was fortunate to be employeed at a hospital, they seem safer in many aspects, and I am glad that I heard the story from this particular LPN so that I don't walk into the same path of destruction. I guess what I am stating is that I am avoiding at all costs places that would even tempt me to risk my license by asking a CNA, dietary aide or housekeeper to adminster my meds or anything else for me.
  2. by   txspadequeenRN
    This is the main reason that a nurse has no buisness working for agency unless they are experienced in the area in which they are working in.



    [quote=pagandeva2000]
    Quote from lmaldo

    It is a shame that many nursing homes do create this atmosphere. I am a new LPN working in a hospital, and one of my friends told me that when she first became a nurse, she worked for an agency that sent her to a nursing home. She went there and found that she had to medicate 40 patients by herself. Most of the patients were demented and didn't have ID bands on, no photo ID on the MAR, and she said that by 5:00 pm, she was still administering morning meds (she was supposed to leave by 3:00).
  3. by   goingnuts
    [quote=pagandeva2000]
    Quote from lmaldo

    I guess what I am stating is that I am avoiding at all costs places that would even tempt me to risk my license by asking a CNA, dietary aide or housekeeper to adminster my meds or anything else for me.
    I guess that is the difference in me and you. I would never be tempted to ask anyone to help me that was not considered qualified. I would have done and have done exactly what the other nurse did. Someone has to work in the nursing home. So I do the best I can. Document whether it happened or not since that is the most important thing. Ridiculous I know but not my doing. Since I have gotten in trouble for not documenting but never for documenting whether or not I really did the job----I think it is pretty obvious what has to be done.
  4. by   txspadequeenRN
    I have been following this thread since the beginning and as anyone else noticed that when you respond to a quote that it is all wrong when you save and post it. Like I responeded to a post by pagandeva2000 but when it posted it says it is quoted by lmaldo....
  5. by   txspadequeenRN
    From the beginning I have been more and more confused by your post. In one post you are all for giving a CNA the meds to give if you are behind . Because anyone can pass a pill right.... Then later in your other post you say you would never do that because you dont want to put your license on the line. Now Im looking at this post and see where you "have got in trouble for not documenting but never for not documenting whether or not I really did the job". Documenting means you did the job. So if you dont document then you didnt do it (the job). There is to much gray area here and I see only black and white.




    Quote from goingnuts
    I guess that is the difference in me and you. I would never be tempted to ask anyone to help me that was not considered qualified. I would have done and have done exactly what the other nurse did. Someone has to work in the nursing home. So I do the best I can. Document whether it happened or not since that is the most important thing. Ridiculous I know but not my doing. Since I have gotten in trouble for not documenting but never for documenting whether or not I really did the job----I think it is pretty obvious what has to be done.
  6. by   1husband
    It's your butt on the line, I would rather chart not given than pass it on to a CNA.
  7. by   goingnuts
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    From the beginning I have been more and more confused by your post. In one post you are all for giving a CNA the meds to give if you are behind . Because anyone can pass a pill right.... Then later in your other post you say you would never do that because you dont want to put your license on the line. Now Im looking at this post and see where you "have got in trouble for not documenting but never for not documenting whether or not I really did the job". Documenting means you did the job. So if you dont document then you didnt do it (the job). There is to much gray area here and I see only black and white.
    Nope you never saw where I said anything about giving a med to a CNA. Better go back and look again. I have said all along I wouldn't do that no matter what. What is so difficult to understand? I think I made myself quite clear. Documenting don't mean ****. But hey you have just reinforced what I said very plainly. By your way of thinking as long as I document I did it then I did it----Right. Wrong. You can't be serious.
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    I have been following this thread since the beginning and as anyone else noticed that when you respond to a quote that it is all wrong when you save and post it. Like I responeded to a post by pagandeva2000 but when it posted it says it is quoted by lmaldo....
    This is confusing me as well...the quotes that are stated are by Imaldo are mine...what is happening here?
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    This is confusing me as well...the quotes that are stated are by Imaldo are mine...what is happening here?
    Sometimes the quote tags 'follow' replies.
  10. by   pagandeva2000
    [QUOTE=txspadequeen921]This is the main reason that a nurse has no buisness working for agency unless they are experienced in the area in which they are working in.

    It is hard to say, because in many cases, new graduates may apply at agencies if they had a hard time searching for employment. I was fortunate in the case that my hospital paid my way through LPN school by allowing me to have a paid leave of absence, and paid my tuition. They had to hire me to fulfill the contract and I have to remain there for two years. Not a bad deal, but there are many nurses that graduate and (shocking to me), are not able to find employment because the curent requirement in their geographical areas are demanding for experienced nurses. Actually, this would have been a difficult assignment for a seasoned person if there are no ID bands or photographs to identify the clients, and this facility is in direct violation by not protecting the patients that cannot advocate for themselves. In my opinion, this facility places nurses in a situation where they have to deviate from being a patient advocate to protecting what they worked hard for. I suspect that while this nurse is new, this is clearly not the first time this has happened. I know I would have never went back there.:angryfire :angryfire
  11. by   txspadequeenRN
    First let me address this junk about documentation. Are you serious ????? Documentation is the only way you can prove you did your job/task..whatever. If you did do it, but didnt document it and it becomes a did you do it or not issue then your just SOL huh... My point here is if you didnt document it then it was not done. Is there something Im missing here , this is nursing 101. This other mess , I went back and re-read your post. You are right and you did not mention you personally giving a CNA meds to give. However, I did not accuse you of that . I made the comment that you seemed like you were all for it if you were behind . Now, I see by re-reading your post that you think it is just as simple as reading the MAR and that you would not be concerned with the training of the CNA but that you just dont want to be reported. You have admitted to not taking BP's with meds and doing assessments before you give meds. In other words you are not concerned about the patient just covering your arse and getting by anyway you can , doing the min.


    Quote from goingnuts
    Nope you never saw where I said anything about giving a med to a CNA. Better go back and look again. I have said all along I wouldn't do that no matter what. What is so difficult to understand? I think I made myself quite clear. Documenting don't mean ****. But hey you have just reinforced what I said very plainly. By your way of thinking as long as I document I did it then I did it----Right. Wrong. You can't be serious.
    Last edit by txspadequeenRN on Oct 25, '06
  12. by   txspadequeenRN
    Please tell me that you are joking or you just were asleep when you wrote this. I shouldnt have to explain this one to you...it is common sense. If you cant handle a manual BP cuff (cause you know if you want the good cuffs you have to bring them yourself) then you shouldnt be passing meds that require a BP.

    [quote=goingnuts][quote=lmaldo] ANd no I don't take a blood pressure everytime I give clonidine. Do you think the equipment in the nursing home is accurate? It is not.]
  13. by   Otessa
    You could probably lose your license if you were ever caught doing that. They are practicing as a nurse without a license(and you are assisting in that).

    VERY bad idea!!!

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