Leaving nursing - page 2

This is my first post, but I have been reading the boards for about 2 months now. I need some advice- I am considering leaving nursing after only being out for 2 years. The reasons I'm considering... Read More

  1. by   Cherish
    Don't give up, you have come a LONG way to give up now. Like everyone else here has said, try a different area. Be it school nursing, LTC, DR. office, HMO, etc., if your near a military post try to check out there employment (sometimes you don't have to go the federal resume route). I can tell that you are passionate about nursing, or you wouldn't have posted your concern. I hope all goes well, and if nursing happens to be not your thing, don't worry there are many avenues you can do to add on to your degree. You could always go back to school for health care management, and with your nursing degree you can work in the hospital as a administrator, assistant director, etc. There are MANY options not only in nursing, but healthcare in general. GOOD LUCK, and GOD BLESS
  2. by   purplemania
    I think that future employers would take into consideration that ICU standards for a novice nurse might be too high. I would certainly consider hiring you for a position other than ICU. You need to reassess your options.
  3. by   wandering_rn
    Thanks to all who have lent their sympathy to me- it does mean a lot. But I have decided to try and go back to school to learn something else- if I can. Yes, nursing may have different career paths in it- however I can't find a job within any field of nursing it seems. I have looked for a job for over a month, but when potential employeers go to contact my last two employeers- they hear very negative things. I don't know how to combat this negative information in interviews. Any suggestions?
  4. by   Dixiedi
    Quote from wandering_rn
    This is my first post, but I have been reading the boards for about 2 months now. I need some advice- I am considering leaving nursing after only being out for 2 years. The reasons I'm considering leaving are numerous. I just don't know if I'm smart enough to be a nurse, and I've been fired from two nursing jobs in a row now- within the space of 3 months. And I can't find another job in the area I'm currently in- after moving accross 3 states to be closer to my family. I'm just so very depressed right now, don't mean to throw myself a pity party. Just wanted to get some suggestions or advice. Thanks
    From what you have said, you became a nurse to be a nurse, not for the believed money or the social status.
    The units are not the place for everybody. You started off in a very difficult place. Maybe acute care is not your place! Try home care or extended care!

    I left nursing for a while, when I came back I was determined NOT to return to the hospital. I love home care and there's a lot more to it than many hospital nurses think.... I have had hospital nurses say to me I am lazy or not knowledgeable because I only work home care where the "pt" doesn't need nursing care anymore, if they did they would still be in the hospital.
    Oh, those poor nurses just don't know what they are missing. Home care is very challenging, but sometimes boring too.
    Try home care, tell the person you interview with how much nursing means to you, show her your grades or NCLEX scores, show her/him anything you have that will convince him/her you want to be a great nurse. And then tell them you apparently weren't meant for the unit. You know that and now trying to find where you fit.
    There is a great need for nurses with vent experience in home care.
  5. by   CHATSDALE
    I Don't Believe That Icu And Step Down Are Good For New Nurses...try Something Else, As The Others Have Suggested, What Type Of Nursing Did You Most Enjoy When You Were In Clinical In School....two Years Is Just A Blip.....you Will Find Your Own Niche Good Luck
  6. by   wandering_rn
    I enjoyed labor and delivery mainly. But there were no L&D jobs avaliable for new grads when I got out. So I choose critical care on the recommendation of my critical care instructor. Like I said- I would like to remain in nursing- but when potential employeers call for my references- all they get is negative information. Any suggestions?
  7. by   explorer
    I just wanted to encourage you and let you know that if you had the ability to make it through nursing school and pass your state boards, you have the ability to be a nurse.


    Quote from wandering_rn
    This is my first post, but I have been reading the boards for about 2 months now. I need some advice- I am considering leaving nursing after only being out for 2 years. The reasons I'm considering leaving are numerous. I just don't know if I'm smart enough to be a nurse, and I've been fired from two nursing jobs in a row now- within the space of 3 months. And I can't find another job in the area I'm currently in- after moving accross 3 states to be closer to my family. I'm just so very depressed right now, don't mean to throw myself a pity party. Just wanted to get some suggestions or advice. Thanks
  8. by   michw2
    Sorry your feeling down. Don't give up on nursing. When they call your old job to verifi employment. There not suppose to give negitive feedback. it considered unethical. maybe like you said there is just not that many jobs in that area. Why don't you try a surgery center and do that for awhile or maybe some home health. Were do you live?
  9. by   nuprofessor
    Just want to echo the comment from EXPLORER. If you passed nursing courses AND passed state boards you can not be that un-"smart". As an educator, I see this occasionally in new grads. Don't give up- there is something out there for you, but you have not found it yet. I had a similar problem years ago. I took time off, thought about it, and came to the conclusion I WAS MEANT TO BE A NURSE. Floor nursing was not my bag! I decided that I had alot to offer NEW nurses as an educator. That was TWO degrees and 11 years ago and I have not looked back.
    This may sound hokey but I actually made a list of the positive and negative aspects of both staying and leaving nursing. It helped me to understand what I had to offer. DIXIEDI had several good ideas in that post- check em out. At the most you just waste a little time. But I personally would not consider it a waste of time to find a position that I like and that likes me.
    GOOD LUCK!!!!!
  10. by   Q.
    Past employers don't give negative feedback. Typically when a prospective employer calls a former employer, they verify dates of employment and position. The only "negative" info they can give is a NO to the question on if you are eligible for rehire. And it sounds like you're not, so the former employer is simply being truthful.

    How about not listing those employers on your job apps? Does the time frame allow you to do that and potentially explain that period of time with something else? (moving, new baby, school, personal reasons?)

    Other areas of nursing to consider are ambulatory care centers, insurance, etc. One nurse I knew didn't do well clinically so she immersed herself in academia - and thrives as a pathophys instructor. There are many options.
  11. by   mattsmom81
    Time to do the hard self work and evaluate what really went wrong in those jobs. And plan a professional response to counter the negative references.

    Many interviewers can be quite empathetic to honest self evals following a termination. Practice presenting as someone who has learned from past mistakes and is ready to move on to something positive for everybody. If you can present yourself in this light a few negative references can be overcome. Make sure you have POSITIVE references to offset the negative, ask former supervisors and coworkers (ones who liked you) to write a reference and present it with your application.

    Most nurse employers understand all it may take is someone in power not liking you to get fired in today's workplace. If they don't appreciate this, I figure I probably don't want to work with them anyway.

    Good luck...it is sad to go through all the hard work of nursing school only to wonder if its not for you, but you aren't the first nurse I've heard ask that. After all that $$ and time, I hope you investigate all the options fully.

    One thought: you were let go during your probationary period so I don't understand why the facilities are taking part in negative referencing to begin with....generally this is a time for both parties to see if there is a good 'fit'...you may want to investigate why they are being so vindictive, and perhaps ask your attorney's advice. Sometimes a demand letter from an attorney can squelch something like this.

    Best wishes.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Jun 4, '04 : Reason: too many typos...LOL!
  12. by   wandering_rn
    Quote from Susy K
    Past employers don't give negative feedback. Typically when a prospective employer calls a former employer, they verify dates of employment and position. The only "negative" info they can give is a NO to the question on if you are eligible for rehire. And it sounds like you're not, so the former employer is simply being truthful.

    How about not listing those employers on your job apps? Does the time frame allow you to do that and potentially explain that period of time with something else? (moving, new baby, school, personal reasons?)

    Other areas of nursing to consider are ambulatory care centers, insurance, etc. One nurse I knew didn't do well clinically so she immersed herself in academia - and thrives as a pathophys instructor. There are many options.
    Yes- past employeers do give negative information- especially in a small town like this one- they may not do it officially- but they do it. Yes, I could lie on my job apps- but this is a small town and people talk- I don't want to go somewhere- be doing fine- and then get fired for lying on a job application.
    I am currently trying to get on with a hospice here in town, we'll see how it turns out.
    Thanks for the advice and encouragement though.
  13. by   barefootlady
    Please do not let these experiences determine your value as a nurse or your value to the profession. It may mean you have to drive a little farther to work, move a short distance to find a job you fit, and get some stress counselling. I am sure there are brighter days ahead for you in nursing. Best wishes for your future. Please, keep us posted.

close