Is this the publics perception of nurses? - page 3

i am a charge RN in a cvicu. yesterday i took care of a man that was pod1 5 vessel cabg on a balloon pump and multiple drips. i had post op'd the pt the previous day so i had developed a repor with... Read More

  1. by   DIPLOMATICRN4HIRE
    Once had someone from housekeeping go to our OR manager and ask if she could apply for a job as a Nurse in the OR because it looks like something she could handle. I fell off my chair in shock. The woman who cant clean a OR room right thinks she can do the job of a nurse. There were about 4 other nurses at the desk when she said this and well she got out of there before someone read her the riot act and about the amount of school one must have to be able to and I quote" Sit on thier A$$ and write on a paper about what happened when the patient was in the room", as she put it to the OR Manager. I was so shocked that she had no clue, and her Daughter is a Nurse in ICU.
    Zoe
  2. by   Flo1216
    THAT is why I get offended when CNAS and medical assistants refer to themselves as nurses.
  3. by   sjoe
    By the same token, how many nurses, including hospital nurses, know what the training/schooling/internship/certification/etc. requirements are for the various positions all around them in radiology, audiology, food services, physical plant services/engineering, administration, billing/financial services, etc.?

    People in each of these positions consider themseves to be just as "special" as nurses consider themsevles to be and it is no wonder that they don't know all the details about nurse qualifications, as we don't know theirs.

    The public can be expected to know even less about it all. They just want to trust their healthcare providers without having to think about all this stuff.
  4. by   Q.
    AustinHeart,

    Perhaps you should've asked this patient just exactly what type of training he felt a nurse has, and should have - so we can be clear on some of the public's perceptions.

    Make no mistake, the public respects us; but I have no doubt a few of them with family members in other areas that require a 4 year degree are confused on why we do not.
  5. by   SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    i only mentioned the different levels of nursing education because the public at large are confused about it...going by what that particular patient stated in the first post...most are aware of the diploma levels but are ignorant about the various degree levels. i certainly wasn't trying to start any sort of lpn vs. adn/diploma vs bsn thread !!! as i've stated before, i wasn't trying to be disrespectful by spelling-out what each levels' requirements are. i just wanted to say that if many folks in the medical/nursing field are confused...then why would it be so hard to understand the general public's confussion.

    i also agree about the stereotypical image that the media/hollywood have of us. they've glamourized nursing, they've sexualized nursing, they've demeaned nursing...so that is another reason why the general public see us as being mindless, obedient hand maidens to physicians...despite the fact that nursing now have more males entering & medicine have more females entering that field as well.

    i'm not seeking any sort of war here...just wanted to clear-up my original thought on the subject because someone has decleared that all of the posts since the first post were about adn vs. bsn & that's just not true !!!

    cheers - moe.
  6. by   Q.
    Originally posted by SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    I'm not seeking any sort of war here...just wanted to clear-up my original thought on the subject because someone has decleared that all of the posts since the first post were about ADN vs. BSN & that's just not true !!!

    Cheers - Moe.
    Exactly. I'm with ya on that.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Not all our counterparts require a baccalaureate degree to practice in their area of expertise...and some require MORE -----for example: Pharmacists soon will need PHARM.d to do what they do-----and RT's don't have bachelors degrees ANYplace I have worked.....just associates' like many of us nurses. I have yet to meet a practicing Social Worker who held less than a Master's degree. Even across the medical field at large, degree requirements DO vary. So, to say nursing should have as it's point of entry a bachelors degree based upon using say, RTs as an example, is inaccurate.

    I still say it's a lot more than the level of entry that puts us in the place we are in the public eye. It is about how we behave publicly....how we present ourselves and our profession. However, Sjoe hit on it, too. The public at large is NOT interested, really, in the exact level of education their nurses possess. Only when it affects them where THEY live. Otherwise, they let TV and the media tell them what to believe about any profession, including nursing. Nature of the beast, sadly, in a society that watches WAY too much TV anyhow.
  8. by   Q.
    Originally posted by Pretzlgl
    And nurses would be respected by doctors unconditionally. And administration would pay nurses what they were really worth, and pigs would start to fly..........Sorry, don't buy it that this would be the great nursing solution.
    I didn't mention in my post that a BSN would accomplish all of the things you listed. I simply mentioned that having ONE point of entry would eliminate confusion among ourselves, and, as evidenced by this patient, the public. Or are you arguing that if we had one method of nursing education, it would NOT eliminate public confusion?
  9. by   Q.
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    Not all our counterparts require a baccalaureate degree to practice in their area of expertise...and some require MORE -----

    And this is an argument to support fragmented nursing education?
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I dunno, I am certainly NOT confused as to what an RN's role is in healthcare.....whether he/she holds a BSN, ADN, or Diploma, it is purty clear to me. How far he/she wishes to go (e.g. mgt) is up to him/her, and yes, dependent on their willingness to advance their education. In the public eye, we still will appear the same unless something MORE is done to change our public image besides more schooling.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    No Suzy,my argument was not to support fragmented education, but to point out the inaccuracy of the statement ---and that making such a point will be useless in changing public opinion of what we do and who we are.
  12. by   SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    originally posted by smilingblueyes
    ...the public at large is not interested, really, in the exact level of education their nurses possess. only when it affects them where they live. otherwise, they let tv and the media tell them what to believe about any profession, including nursing. nature of the beast, sadly, in a society that watches way too much tv anyhow.
    and here lies a huge part of the problem partly because nurses can't seem to unite & fight against these sterotypical images!!! we're too busy fighting amoung ourselves regarding our status!!!

    cheers - moe.
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I can't argue w/you there, Moe. I bet the public does not know a huge number of our police officers posses bachelors degrees (or higher) either. They DON'T care! They DO care the public image they see. It's just the truth.

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