I felt very uncomfortable today as an LPN with less than 2 months of experience. I wo

  1. This post was edited
    Last edit by skittlebear on Nov 23, '06
    •  
  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   tgb3rn
    I would refuse to do anything outside of your scope. Worst thing they can do is get made at you. Can't fire you for doing the right thing. If they persist in trying to get you to do this sort of thing--report them after getting another job. Would you rather have them mad at you and have to find another job or lose your ability to work as an LPN all together.
    Just my opinion
    Good luck
    Tom
  4. by   Tweety
    Don't ever do anything you're not comfortable doing or qualified to do. Check with your management early enough so there's no drama when you get there.

    Good luck!
  5. by   BSNtobe2009
    Keep your chin up!
  6. by   MadamMermaid
    Don't let anyone pressure you into anything outside your scope. People put on the pressure and act as though you're being a burdeon BUT what do you think will happen if there was an error? Anyone gonna have your back then? Definately not. Good luck and be strong!
  7. by   TazziRN
    I think that being IV certified just means being certified to START them. In CA LVNs can be certified to start IVs but cannot give anything through them, not even piggybacks. You should check with your state's BON and see if LVNs are allowed to push meds IV. If not, your employer CANNOT force you to do so, or they would be violating all kinds of rules.
  8. by   macross
    I agree, it is up to you to know you scope. Even if you are told to do something, if it was wrong, it will still come back to you.

    If you don't know for sure you can do it, don't.

    Good luck, this is a hard place to be.
  9. by   P_RN
    Unless you have received official instruction in doing ANY nursing procedure you are not to perform it.

    As others have written check the scope of practice for LPNs in your state. In my state LPNs are formally instructed in IV therapy and in what they can and CANNOT do. Accessing a central line is limited to RNs and to senior LPNs with advanced training. In other words new LPNs are not allowed. There is also a formulary of meds LPNs are not allowed to administer either peripherally or through a central line.

    Think about it, do you WANT to work for a place that wants you to do something illegal?
  10. by   Cheez-It!
    You need to check your state laws. Here in Ohio, as an LPN, I'm not allowed to so much as think about touching a central line. I'm not sure about being IV certified, since I'm not. But, one thing I learned in school, don't do it if you're not comfortable doing it.
  11. by   Mulan
    Quote from P_RN
    Unless you have received official instruction in doing ANY nursing procedure you are not to perform it.

    As others have written check the scope of practice for LPNs in your state. In my state LPNs are formally instructed in IV therapy and in what they can and CANNOT do. Accessing a central line is limited to RNs and to senior LPNs with advanced training. In other words new LPNs are not allowed. There is also a formulary of meds LPNs are not allowed to administer either peripherally or through a central line.

    Think about it, do you WANT to work for a place that wants you to do something illegal?
    That's interesting, I didn't know LPN's could access central lines. Things vary so from state to state and place to place.
  12. by   skittlebear
    well...according to my state I would be breaking several rules if I gave that med. LPNS, according to my sate, state that you can only give IV medications PROVIDED that you are IV certified, of course, 2. The LPN adm IV push meds in peripheral lines only, 3. LPNs shall not adm moderate sedation. Hmm...I would be breaking several rules huh. Even if this other nurse gets mad at me today...I may have to call her to drive out and give this medication again. The thing is though, she wasn't IV certified either, she just gave the med. My gosh. oh well, I'm off to work. THanks for the replies.
  13. by   dream'n
    O.k. you now have me worried. There are some employers that will throw a new nurse to the wolves, I have seen it happen before. They feel as long as a warm body is assigned, they don't need to be concerned with that person's training and scope. As the nurse with a license and duty, you need to be proactive. Always know your your scope of practice and practice accordingly and safely. I know it can be hard to tell your employer no, especially when you are a new nurse and don't have much experience, but sometimes you may have to. Know what you can legally and safely do, it is part of being a professional nurse.

close