I can't stop crying... need encouragement... - page 5

I work at a long term care facility on the 11-7 shift, and tonight's shift has been a nightmare. I am the only RN in the building with 156 residents and 5 LPNs. Any emergency or crisis is my... Read More

  1. by   Cute_CNA
    Quote from Daytonite
    Somehow, I doubt very much that the boss would approve of what is going on regarding the Internet. There are lots of things to be done during quiet periods. Refrigerators need cleaning, cupboards need cleaning and rearranging, med cart drawers can almost always use a washing and straightening up. Somewhere pages are falling out of charts that could use hole reinforcements. People can go from room to room looking in on the patients just to make sure they are OK. How many patients could have been taken to the BR instead of left to pee in a diaper? Did all the MARs and TARs get checked for missing signatures? For all the time spent here on the forum, the facility might as well get rid of it's supervisor. Doesn't seem like there is anything for her to do for the facility.

    By my count there were 27 posts generated since about 12am (that's the time showing on my computer, but I'm in a Pacific time zone) and there is at least one post every single hour up to now. That's more than just looking for advice--that's goofing off on the job. Someone doing this deserves to be fired.

    :smackingf :smackingf

    My goodness. Are you saying that Lori is not allowed to be human at times?

    Furthermore, HOW ON EARTH CAN YOU EFFECTIVELY TEND TO PATIENTS AND OFFER SUPERVISION TO YOUR SUBORDINATES WHEN YOU'RE THAT UPSET?!!

    When I'm upset, it incapacitates me, and I cannot do as good as job as when I'm calm. Sometimes it's extremely hard not to overtly react in an emotional way when something distresses you that much, and I think it's a good sign that she is distressed when something bad happens.

    My goodness. Lori is not Wonder Woman and she isn't perfect (no one is). People AT ALL LEVELS need encouragement at some point or another. No one is on top of things 100% of the time.

    Good grief.

    :smackingf
  2. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from mar326
    It amazes me that people actually think Internet use on resident care time is ok. Employees of LTC facilites are paid to be care takers of Residents not to surf the internet. That is like where I work, the supervisor thinks its ok for a CNA to study for a classs she is taking if her work is done.This is on the PM shift so no administration is aware of it. A CNA's work is never done,there is always something to do. I believe a person is paid for 8 hours of work and they shouldWORK that 8 hours.
    I realize that this is a rather informal BB in this particular area of this website, but in other areas of the allnurses website are valuable links, news and information that nurses can and do use daily on a professional basis. This information is a resource that I find easier to use than many paper references.

    I "surf" the web quite frequently to get information about a drug, a disease process, or other information regarding nursing judgment calls. I also heavily use the online translator for foreign patients, MedWeb, Wikipedia and others. For instance, I had a patient who had a gastric surgery and for the life of me, couldn't recall exactly what the surgery entailed. I found it, printed it, and made sure the information went into our nurse's report.

    I'm not looking at porn, I'm not playing solitaire, I'm not chatting or goofing off.

    It's more like reading the AJN in the break room, except that online I can find the article I want a lot faster.

    PS Our facility is enlightened enough to realize that the Internet is a huge resource, and we have permission to use it as such.
  3. by   mtnmom
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I realize that this is a rather informal BB in this particular area of this website, but in other areas of the allnurses website are valuable links, news and information that nurses can and do use daily on a professional basis. This information is a resource that I find easier to use than many paper references.

    I "surf" the web quite frequently to get information about a drug, a disease process, or other information regarding nursing judgment calls. It's more like reading the AJN in the break room, except that online I can find the article I want a lot faster.

    PS Our facility is enlightened enough to realize that the Internet is a huge resource, and we have permission to use it as such.

    I agree - to be certain there is always the potential for misuse, but the Internet is a valued resource when faced with needing information on, for instance, a patient with a rare condition. My current facility does not provide internet access for employees, and there have been many times irecently in the middle of the night when I would have liked to access a little extra info to help me better understand and care for particular patients. Even my PDA does not encompass everything I might need to look up.

    People who are going to goof off are going to do it with or without a computer (if Confucius had been computer literate I'm sure he would have said that).

    I have found allnurses to be an excellent resource and way to network with colleagues all over the world. We all bring to the table our individual strengths and also our weaknesses. I believe that with all the trials and tribulations we as nurses endure, our responsibility to each other is to be supportive. Sometimes this support, by necessity, includes constructive criticism. But it should not be destructive - and there is a difference.

    I'm not trying to take any sides here. Everyone who has posted on this thread has my utmost respect.
  4. by   Daytonite
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    II "surf" the web quite frequently to get information about a drug, a disease process, or other information regarding nursing judgment calls. I also heavily use the online translator for foreign patients, MedWeb, Wikipedia and others. . .It's more like reading the AJN in the break room, except that online I can find the article I want a lot faster.
    I'm willing to bet that it doesn't take you 27 posts over a 7 or 8 hour period to get that information.
    Quote from rn/writer
    Your loaded phraseology--hiding in the office, playing around on the computer, sitting around doing nothing--suggests a cynical attitude and a serious distrust of others.
    It comes from many years of experience in supervision. You'd be surprised what people will try to get away with on the job if they think they are not being watched. A supervisor is being paid to prevent this from happening.
    Quote from Cute-CNA
    My goodness. Are you saying that Lori is not allowed to be human at times? . .Furthermore, HOW ON EARTH CAN YOU EFFECTIVELY TEND TO PATIENTS AND OFFER SUPERVISION TO YOUR SUBORDINATES WHEN YOU'RE THAT UPSET?!!
    It's nearly impossible to offer supervision (and help) to your subordinates when you are on a computer surfing and posting messages on the Internet. I never criticized the OP for crying over her situation although I did make an admittedly snide comment that was meant to mean that I've experienced worse stress at work. My comments have primarily been directed at the misbehavior of using the employer's computer equipment for personal entertainment during a time when a person is supposed to be working. Check out the number of posts made last night alone--all done on the employer's computer since it's been mentioned that her personal computer at home isn't working. What would you say to that if you were her boss? As a CNA I can't believe that you would be very happy about an RN, supervisor or charge nurse, sitting on her behind surfing the net or reading Avon catalogs while you were elbow deep in BM and a host of other patient problems. I don't believe you wouldn't be upset by it. These are the kinds of nurses who contribute to the bad reputation that LTC has. I guarantee you that you won't find many acute hospital staff RNs able to surf the Internet for hours and hours during their work shifts. I would so love to hear from the LPNs who are supervised by this OP. I think they would be singing a much different tune, particularly if they really knew what was going on.
  5. by   rn/writer
    Quote from mar326
    It amazes me that people actually think Internet use on resident care time is ok. Employees of LTC facilites are paid to be care takers of Residents not to surf the internet. That is like where I work, the supervisor thinks its ok for a CNA to study for a classs she is taking if her work is done.This is on the PM shift so no administration is aware of it. A CNA's work is never done,there is always something to do. I believe a person is paid for 8 hours of work and they shouldWORK that 8 hours.
    Shouldn't this be a matter for individual facilities and units to decide?

    Every place I have worked, there have been crazy times when you're running your legs off, answering call bells, answering the phone, meeting patients' needs at warp speed. Many nights, I go without a break. Conversely, there are less hectic nights. In my current hospital, we are allowed to, no, encouraged to use the down time for looking up learning links on the computer and studying various online inservices. We have access to a number of medical resources and these have been invaluable for looking up new meds, new treatments, side effects, unusual conditions, etc.

    Employers can and do look at an individual's computer habits. If they see problematic usage, they can certainly take the person to task. For this reason as well as out of general respect, employees would do well to abide by any limits set by the facility/unit manager and be grateful for whatever opportunities they have to improve their skills and their knowledge.

    If you have a complaint about the CNA on your unit, by all means, take it up with someone in charge, but, please don't assume that everyone who uses a computer on the job for anything other than charting is goldbricking.
  6. by   Daytonite
    rn/writer. . .you're wavering on your position. You know I'm right.
  7. by   rn/writer
    Quote from Daytonite
    rn/writer. . .you're wavering on your position. You know I'm right.
    How do you figure I'm wavering?
  8. by   Daytonite
    Quote from rn/writer
    How do you figure I'm wavering?
    You said:
    Quote from rn/writer
    Employers can and do look at an individual's computer habits. If they see problematic usage, they can certainly take the person to task. For this reason as well as out of general respect, employees would do well to abide by any limits set by the facility/unit manager and be grateful for whatever opportunities they have to improve their skills and their knowledge.
    You now mention limits and general respect. That wasn't part of your earlier posts.
  9. by   rn/writer
    You said: Quote:
    Originally Posted by rn/writer
    Employers can and do look at an individual's computer habits. If they see problematic usage, they can certainly take the person to task. For this reason as well as out of general respect, employees would do well to abide by any limits set by the facility/unit manager and be grateful for whatever opportunities they have to improve their skills and their knowledge.



    Quote from Daytonite
    You said:You now mention limits and general respect. That wasn't part of your earlier posts.
    One reason it wasn't part of my earlier posts is because that wasn't the focus of my attention. I came to Lori's overall defense because I felt you had already judged her actions and scolded her harshly without waiting to hear the answers to the questions you had asked. There was no indication that Lori's use of this forum was problematic to her employer or that it crossed any lines drawn by her facility so my response didn't relate to her at all.

    I was responding to another post that said it's just flat out wrong to use the Internet during work hours.

    In the portions you highlighted I meant that it's not for any of us to make a blanket statement that Internet use is always wrong during work hours. It should be up to the facility and/or the unit to decide what and when extracurricular computer use is acceptable.

    We have no information on what the official policy is at Lori's faclilty, so I wasn't making even a veiled reference to her. She may be violating your standards without crossing any of the lines where she works.

    When I said that employers can and do look at employee usage, I was saying that we should all keep that in mind. I'd like to add that if you stay within the official boundaries (which will, of necessity, vary from one facility to another), you shouldn't have anything to fear.

    I don't know what standards, if any, Lori's workplace has set, so I'm not going to sit in judgement on that part of her communication with us. I still think your demeanor with her left much to be desired (your use of loaded phrases, your statement that the dressing down you'd give her would leave her embarrassed). I'm guessing we'll have to agree to disagree on that.

    Despite our differences, I hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving.
  10. by   warrior woman
    Quote from Daytonite
    Somehow, I doubt very much that the boss would approve of what is going on regarding the Internet. There are lots of things to be done during quiet periods. Refrigerators need cleaning, cupboards need cleaning and rearranging, med cart drawers can almost always use a washing and straightening up. Somewhere pages are falling out of charts that could use hole reinforcements. People can go from room to room looking in on the patients just to make sure they are OK. How many patients could have been taken to the BR instead of left to pee in a diaper? Did all the MARs and TARs get checked for missing signatures? For all the time spent here on the forum, the facility might as well get rid of it's supervisor. Doesn't seem like there is anything for her to do for the facility.

    By my count there were 27 posts generated since about 12am (that's the time showing on my computer, but I'm in a Pacific time zone) and there is at least one post every single hour up to now. That's more than just looking for advice--that's goofing off on the job. Someone doing this deserves to be fired.
    Nice to know that there are some still perfect "company nurses" out there to show us poor saps the light. God help us all.
  11. by   catlady
    If I could add up all the lunch breaks I never took and get paid for them now, I could retire. Many of those shifts were in long-term care, where you are often the only RN and legally can't even step off your floor or outside the building. Many of those shifts were in critical care, where the night supervisor told us that we weren't entitled to take a break (in a 12-hr shift!!) because we worked a straight shift without being docked for a break. So much for labor laws, eh? I am so indoctrinated to the idea that I am not entitled to a break that even now, working as a supervisor in an 8-5 setting, I feel like a wimp or a wuss if I take some time for myself. I constantly remind my staff to take their breaks but almost never do it myself.

    If this nurse was so stressed out that she took a few minutes for herself and reached out for some support, so be it! Perhaps her manager should look into whether she is abusing her internet privileges, but nothing she posted deserved her being raked over the coals the way she was, by a total stranger.

    If I randomly caught one of my nurses flipping through a magazine at their desk or looking up their travel plans on Expedia, I probably wouldn't say anything right away. If I came back 20 minutes later and they were still doing it, or if I saw they weren't getting their work done, then I would.

    Long-term care is so much harder than anyone who's never done it could possibly realize. I was a fairly mobile supervisor myself, but there are some tasks that cry to be done alone, in a quiet office, where you can hear yourself think. She shouldn't have been flamed for that, either. I hope the OP is able to get some support from her manager. Management is so much more than being able to rule your employees.
  12. by   rn/writer
    Quote from catlady
    If I could add up all the lunch breaks I never took and get paid for them now, I could retire. Many of those shifts were in long-term care, where you are often the only RN and legally can't even step off your floor or outside the building. Many of those shifts were in critical care, where the night supervisor told us that we weren't entitled to take a break (in a 12-hr shift!!) because we worked a straight shift without being docked for a break. So much for labor laws, eh? I am so indoctrinated to the idea that I am not entitled to a break that even now, working as a supervisor in an 8-5 setting, I feel like a wimp or a wuss if I take some time for myself. I constantly remind my staff to take their breaks but almost never do it myself.

    If this nurse was so stressed out that she took a few minutes for herself and reached out for some support, so be it! Perhaps her manager should look into whether she is abusing her internet privileges, but nothing she posted deserved her being raked over the coals the way she was, by a total stranger.

    If I randomly caught one of my nurses flipping through a magazine at their desk or looking up their travel plans on Expedia, I probably wouldn't say anything right away. If I came back 20 minutes later and they were still doing it, or if I saw they weren't getting their work done, then I would.

    Long-term care is so much harder than anyone who's never done it could possibly realize. I was a fairly mobile supervisor myself, but there are some tasks that cry to be done alone, in a quiet office, where you can hear yourself think. She shouldn't have been flamed for that, either. I hope the OP is able to get some support from her manager. Management is so much more than being able to rule your employees.
    Amen to that!
  13. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    I'm sorry I wasn't able to get back on yesterday morning, I had been working on an inservice and decided to stay late and include the 7-3 CNAs as well. Let me see if I can clear some things up.

    First of all, I want to thank again everyone who has been supportive of me. I wasn't trying to be a baby or beg for undeserved sympathy. I was honestly overwhelmed. And in the midst of that to find one of my favorite ladies hemmorhaging from the mouth... it broke my heart. I do connect with my staff, they always know they can come to me.

    My job description is Clinical Nurse Manager. At my LTC facility, we have recently opened up a rehab wing. State laws require that an RN be present on that wing since it is orthopedic and cardiac rehab. That is why my office is on this wing. I am required to spend the majority of my time on this wing, and it is also the most highly staffed. Whenever there are callouts that I cannot cover, I function as a floor nurse or a CNA, and have done both many, many times. My main job is to be available for emergency situations. In the meantime I do have many duties, most of which are done within about six hours of steady work. So I voluntarily take other duties that would usually fall on the day shift managers (during the day, there are 8 RNs in the building compared to just one at night, but they help me out when they can also.) Not only do I keep up the rehab paperwork, but I also make rounds of the entire building several times a night. I wore a pedometer a few weeks ago, in one night I walked 3.4 miles. There are slow periods when the residents are sleeping. My staff is allowed to read, surf the net (except anything obscene, we have a firewall and an information systems man who reviews internet usage), watch television on low volume, or chat with eachother during slow times. I conduct random call bell audits, so I know that they are not neglecting their residents, and I place cards beneath total care residents and monitor when they are returned. I do keep a good watch over the facility.

    It was mentioned by someone extremely judgemental that I get paid for 8 hours of work and need to do that. Well, I do get paid for 8 hours of work but end up doing 10 or 11 most nights. Our day shift RNs don't come in until 9am (except for the DON) and sometimes I am not comfortable with the status of a resident or with the staffing situation and I will wait for them to arrive before I leave. Payday was yesterday, and I had 21.5 hours of overtime, at a pay rate of $0.00. I can guarantee you that I did not spend 21.5 hours on the internet.

    That is all the justifying I intend to do regarding my internet time. Some people are just cold-natured, and nothing will change that. The people whose opinions matter to me have been incredibly supportive, and I can't tell you how much I needed that. Someone mentioned that it was a problem for me to identify with my residents more than with my staff. I don't know where you got the idea that I wasn't identifying with my staff. I was a CNA until I was out of nursing school and then a floor nurse for years. I identify with them. As for the residents, I took care of my great-grandmother until she died of Alzheimers, and the residents do have a special place in my heart. I think that makes me a better nurse.

    I do love my job. Usually, things do not happen all at once like that (thank goodness.) It may not have been as dramatic as back-to-back codes, but does that negate my reaction? Daytonite, you must be one of those annoying people who always has to "one-up" everyone. Your personality really comes through in your posts. I can just imagine... a patient tells you they have a headache, you say "That's nothing, I had a migraine, and I didn't whine and ask for Tylenol like a big ole baby!" As for embarrassing me with a dressing down, don't flatter yourself.

    Again, thank you for the support I received... I'm not gonna "throw out the baby with the bathwater" as my Grandma says. I am still glad that I came here for help and would do it again despite the closemindedness of some. I'm proud to be a member.

    Lori

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