I can't get "poop" taste out of my mouth? - page 3

Long story short, had 2nd clinical ever today and was assigned to a very edematous bed-bound pt with right-sided CHF. She had really bad skin breakdown and, as we were turning her to change the... Read More

  1. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from Philly85
    Wow, seriously you guys with all the hate? I was asking a serious question and NO IT'S NOT A DENTAL ISSUE. I floss every night and have perfect teeth and gums and have never had a cavity.

    And YES, I wanted to slap the nurse, b/c we were taught that you are supposed to roll up the dirty bedding gently and so that the dirty side is on the inside, while having the dirty linens bin nearby, not just fling it all over the place and eventually onto the floor, causing debris to go everywhere.

    The residual "taste" has mostly gone away, and I have several nurse friends who have confirmed that they have had this happen as well.

    So, yeah, you can all get off your high horse. Jeez...
    Wait - your second day of clinical and you're talking about a high horse? The nurse didn't do things the way you were taught? We were all taught stuff. Some of it even stuck. But if you're already wanting to slap people for not doing things the way you were taught - you've got a lo-o-o-ng career ahead of you. Or a really short one.

    You're going to have to learn to laugh at poo. And yourself.
  2. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Philly85
    And YES, I wanted to slap the nurse, b/c we were taught that you are supposed to roll up the dirty bedding gently and so that the dirty side is on the inside, while having the dirty linens bin nearby, not just fling it all over the place and eventually onto the floor, causing debris to go everywhere.
    In my 30 years I have never once seen linen rolled "gently" or had the luxury of having a nearby dirty linen bag (ours are currently locked in the dirty utility room because, you know, aesthetics). To roll "gently" would take too much time leaving my patient uncomfortably positioned with their butt hanging out. The reason it's done quickly is to minimize stress on the patient and if that means pulling out the linen and tossing it on the floor so be it. Just because you were taught one way in nursing school doesn't necessarily make it right or other ways wrong. You're going to need to learn how to roll with the punches.
  3. by   datalore
    You're going to see many a coworker do things in a way that you don't prefer and/or that gets bodily stuff on you. It's not always carelessness or being incorrect. I've seen everything on that spectrum, like someone focused so much on the patient that they didn't realize they whipped the pee-soaked gown into their coworker's face instead of the hamper. Accident. Usually it's as simple as saying, "Oops, careful, that's going in my mouth," and that's enough to fix it.
  4. by   DeeAngel
    When changing or turning morbidly best people in bed, I wear a mask and glasses. I don't care who it offends, I have a right to protect myself. Always do this to prevent just what you're experienced. I have encountered some truly unholy things in my day from turning patients.
  5. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from DeeAngel
    When changing or turning morbidly best people in bed, I wear a mask and glasses. I don't care who it offends, I have a right to protect myself. Always do this to prevent just what you're experienced. I have encountered some truly unholy things in my day from turning patients.
    Heck, I'd wear a full bio-hazard suit when removing thigh-high TED hose if they'd let me!
  6. by   ClaraRedheart
    My very first clinical, I was tasked with giving a patient a bed bath (along with another student) We had just read about the danger of friction and shear, and had never worked in a hospital setting and were tentative. Fresh knee surgery. We could NOT get the gown undone. We called a passing-by nurse in who huffed and rolled her eyes at us to do something so simple (just cut the ties with her med-scissors). We finished. We were notified by the primary nurse later that the patient requested to NOT have students in her room again. I was a tiny bit offended, but really... now, I get it. Like your ridiculous perfect turning scenario, things do NOT happen beautifully and like in the text book in a hospital. Rather than come up with the solution to cut the gown, or even support the patient to sit up so we could untie it, we tried during a sloppily executed turn one to two times and then gave up. Sometimes things are not pretty, and they might hurt for a second, but you get things done efficiently. If your preceptor was a med-surg nurse, she likely had 2-3 other people waiting for things and a busy tech (or she wouldn't have been changing the bed by herself). Help more, whine less. You'll wish for the same grace from your students in the future when and if you get the privilege to have them to learn from your experience as a nurse.
  7. by   foggnm
    I worked in a trauma/surgical/burn ICU and I know exactly what you're talking about. I even have thought about introducing a nasal spray for nurses called 'No Scents' that you can use to spray in your nose after having to smell whatever bad smell it is. I figured it would contain some essential oils or other scents to override the receptors. If anyone wants to help bring this to market, private message me. You can use some vick's vapor rub or peppermint oil on your neck or something else equally pungent to get that sticky smell out of your airway/mouth/nose.
  8. by   Amethya
    I'm not a nurse, but a CMA. My first days of doing my internships at a major doctor's office, that had different specialties in one building. I had a turn at the orthopedics- sports medicine area. I had to help the lady that did casts do this cast on a elderly, heavy, diabetic lady. Poor thing was immobile, and extremely heavy looking, but we had to put her in a cast because of wounds she would get. After that, and seeing some things in OB, I become somewhat immune to some things, because I'm talking about dust of skin flakes flying around, trying to cut the old cast, and I probably swallowed some and horrible stink of cat pee and other stuff after opening that cast, that I had to learn to hold my breath so well and talk at the same time, I mastered it easily.

    I'm sure you guys see more than I did, but I'm sure you'll get so immune to these things, it won't faze you anymore. Just keep at it and don't freak out because there's more to see. xD
  9. by   Skips
    Aww, this reminds me of the very first time I did peri care in CNA class!

    I had that smell in my nose for a week. But it wasn't really my nose, it was all in my head. Because I wasn't used to it.

    You will get there.

    Also, I wouldn't make comments like "I wanted to slap her!" on this site.
  10. by   kalycat
    Quote from hppygr8ful
    Sorry you got all the hate because I hear your frustration and fear. Still this part of your reply made me laugh so hard I almost peed myself. Granted I'm a crusty old bat with a weak bladder but that's a tale for another post.

    You will soon learn that what you learn in nursing school and what happens in the real world of nursing where you are often doing bed/diaper changes and such by yourself with one hand behind your back is what really happens. I have worked L&D (A body fluids bonanza)

    Hppy
    Officially stealing "body fluids bonanza".

    my first day on the floor alone after transferring from the OR, I was washing my hands at a sink station outside a patient's room. Just then, an overhead page from our monitor tech - the patient was reading asystole on the monitor. I ran in with wet hands, no time for gloves, and started compressions, calling a code.

    What ensued was an extremely prolonged, messy code. The patient had become incontinent of stool, initially. In the process of getting the bed down in CPR position and the backboard placed, I got drenched in diarrhea. For some reason, we were short on Med students and residents that night, and all the nurses were taking turns with compressions.

    The patient had had just come back from having a new chest port placed. After 15 minutes of compressions, a major leak was sprung. Blood everywhere. When anesthesia arrived to intubate, they tubed the goose on the first try, resulting in a vomit fountain. Since it was immediately after dinner, the patient had a full stomach.

    The code went on for an hour and a half, with a poor outcome. We were all sweating profusely from CPR, and more than one code team member's deodorant quit halfway through. Family was present, screaming in the hallway as the body fluids bonanza progressed.

    Luckily I had time to grab gloves at one point, but myself and several others walked out of there covered in unspeakable amounts of fluids. The person turning the patient for back board placement didn't mean to flail feces all over me. The RT didn't mean to send vomit flying and hit the code captain in the face while she was trying to suction.

    Stool happens. We could have used picture perfect technique, but adrenaline was high. I wanted a bleach shower after, but I needed to perform postmortem care and clean up the scene so the family could see their loved one.

    I always carry vicks. Nurses have a wide variety of techniques and skill sets. No one is perfect. Keep your eyes open and learn. Some people are brought your way to show you how to do things. Some people the universe sends to you so you can learn how NOT to practice. Either way, embrace it and reserve judgment. The oppprtunites for learning are endless.
  11. by   OrganizedChaos
    Quote from Philly85
    Everyone, me saying "I wanted to slap the nurse", didn't mean I actually REALLY wanted to slap her. It's an expression! I just meant that I was annoyed with her for basically flapping all the debris DIRECTLY in mine and another student's faces.

    Yes, maybe she was just having a rough day and I'm not saying I "know it all." However, several of the comments in this thread actually worry me. I hope I don't end up as a nurse who feels like it is OK to cut corners and do a poor job just because I've been a nurse for 20 years and have "seen it all" and know how the world of nursing "really works."

    I know there are a lot of staffing issues, but does it really take that much extra effort to roll a sheet and not flail it everywhere?
    Lol. No one has been rude except you. Even saying you wanted to slap the nurse is inconsiderate. You are a new nursing student on their second day of clinical. That was an experienced nurse. To
    criticize how the nurse did something is rude & ignorant. Not everything is by the book. Trust me, you will find out *if* you pass nursing school, the NCLEX & get a job. But with that attitude, don't be surprised if your nursing career is cut short.
  12. by   kbrn2002
    Quote from cocoa_puff
    It is how the elderly bestow their wisdom and good-nature upon us.
    You must not work exclusively with elders. Wisdom and good nature in LTC residents is pretty rare! More like confusion and agitation being rained upon us by the elder dust. It must be contagious, that would explain a lot.

    ps I am SO stealing elder dust. Perfect description!
  13. by   Philly85
    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    Lol. No one has been rude except you. Even saying you wanted to slap the nurse is inconsiderate. You are a new nursing student on their second day of clinical. That was an experienced nurse. To
    criticize how the nurse did something is rude & ignorant. Not everything is by the book. Trust me, you will find out *if* you pass nursing school, the NCLEX & get a job. But with that attitude, don't be surprised if your nursing career is cut short.
    So just because I'm brand new, I'm not allowed to call out an experienced nurse for a legitimate reason? Maybe me saying "I wanted to slap the nurse" was a poor choice of wording, I was just annoyed b/c I got a huge debris cloud right in my face.

    And I obviously don't think she did it on purpose, I'm sure she just wasn't thinking of it at the time for perhaps any number of reasons. I understand that people make mistakes and I know I'm not above making them, either.

    However, just because I don't have any experience doesn't preclude me from being allowed to be annoyed. If I were a nurse with 20 yrs experience, everyone on here would probably say "omg, I know I hate when people do that", instead of smacking me down b/c of lack of experience.

    I'm usually a very patient and understanding person. Note I did not *actually* slap her, nor did I say anything to her, as I understand it was not on purpose. She actually was really helpful to me throughout the day and let me do several things we had just learned in lab. This was not an attack on her, I was just venting my frustration, as any normal person would.

    And to address another poster who had mentioned the code situation and not being able to help "slinging" things at each other, my situation was completely different. Things were pretty calm on the floor at the time and the nurse was not rushing around or showing any outward signs of being stressed out. I understand she still may have been stressed and was just doing a good job of keeping her composure, but still, she definitely did not need to be flinging around those sheets like that.

    AGAIN, I understand no one is perfect and it may have been a one-time thing. I was just VENTING, people!

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