How much education to be a state inspector?

  1. 0
    My hubby has started his pre-req's for his RN, then plans to pursue bachelor's and master's. He says he wants to be a state inspector. Does he need all this education for that?

    Blessings, Michelle
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  3. 15 Comments so far...

  4. 2
    Not where I have seen. I know surveyors that are ADN's. But, most of them have been DON's and multiple years of experience under the belt. It isn't the degree they are looking for but, the experience.
    Siddhartha and Nascar nurse like this.
  5. 0
    In my state.. you need to be an RN with at least 5-8 years of experience (a BS counts for 1 year of experience and Masters is 2 years total). He still needs to work a regular nursing job for the other part of the required experience.
  6. 3
    I worked as a surveyor for my state for several years, and most of the nurse surveyors (even the team leader/bosses) were ADN-prepared with no additional formal education. However, we all had many years of clinical experience. I think, from my experience doing it, that the experience is a much more significant factor for surveying than (additional) formal education.

    If the OP's husband is serious about pursuing a career as a surveyor, he'd be much better off hunkering down and getting several years of full-time, varied, solid clinical experience than spending extra years getting additional degrees. Surveying is something people do after they've already established a successful clinical career, not something you do starting out in nursing.
    NeoNurseTX, Jarnaes, and noc4senuf like this.
  7. 0
    Michelle,
    I applied for an opening with the division of health and human services approximately 6 months ago and one of the requirements was a 4 year degree here in North Carolina. This would be a dream job, it just seems that this is the only sure way to keep patients safe these days.
  8. 0
    [quote=cimplyc60;4073392]Michelle,
    I applied for an opening with the division of health and human services approximately 6 months ago and one of the requirements was a 4 year degree here in North Carolina. This would be a dream job, it just seems that this is the only sure way to keep patients safe these days.
  9. 0
    The requirements vary from state to state. To work for my state government in any capacity, a BSN is required. Board of Health, BON, state-run facilities.
  10. 0
    Quote from noc4senuf
    it isn't the degree they are looking for but, the experience.
    this is unfortunately not the case in our state. that rn is the magic title here. i'm an lpn with nearly 25 years' experience and a bs in psychology. about 8 years ago i applied for a state surveyor job as i'd had many years' experience(more than half my nursing career) in ltc's. requirements for the surveyor job were (1): 2+ years' experience in the nursing field, social work, or work with persons with developmental disabilities and a bs in a related field or (2) currently licensed as an rn.

    probation period was a whole year during which you had to take state and federal exams for various certifications. i was so sure that i'd be bringing the best of both worlds to that job and be selected but it became apparent that an rn is really what they wanted. obviously they must have had a number of lpns apply as it wasn't too long before the qualifications were changed to include this statement: "lpn status is not acceptable as training or experience." interesting....social workers could be accepted but one with many years' experience with ltcs was not. very sad because ltc's are typically staffed heavily with lpns, so who better to work in the role of a surveyor???


  11. 0
    I'm sorry but, I was referring to various RN degrees and not LPN's. I have never known an LPN to be a surveyor.
  12. 0
    Quote from noc4senuf
    I'm sorry but, I was referring to various RN degrees and not LPN's. I have never known an LPN to be a surveyor.
    Ditto. My state is one that doesn't require a BSN, just RN licensure (minimum); but you do have to be an RN -- LPNs are not considered for surveying positions, even in LTC, regardless of how much clinical experience they may have.


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