How many quit???

  1. I've heard that a large % of people who start the nursing program drop out - what is your experience in this? I'm worried about going so much in debt and not being able to finish the program once I start.
    Guess I'm feeling kinda dumb today - have a test and as usual feel totally unprepared even though I've studied for hours!!
    Any tips on studying for A&P???
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  2. 52 Comments

  3. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from Deb123j
    I've heard that a large % of people who start the nursing program drop out - what is your experience in this? I'm worried about going so much in debt and not being able to finish the program once I start.
    Guess I'm feeling kinda dumb today - have a test and as usual feel totally unprepared even though I've studied for hours!!
    Any tips on studying for A&P???
    When I attended nursing school ( back in the olden days) the drop out/failure rate was 30%. On the first day of school, the instructor told us to look at the person to the right and left of us, then told us, "one of you won't graduate."
    Wonderful confindence builder!:uhoh21:

    I had a wonderful A and P instructor, who encouraged us to work within a study group and quiz each other- it was the best suggestion and we all did well.
  4. by   llg
    The figures on people dropping out and/or flunking out vary widely from school to school and depend on a variety of factors. For example, some schools accept all students who meet a certain minimum standard of academic performance -- even though those students may have to wait a few semesters for "their turn" to start actually taking the nursing courses. With such "generous" admission standards, entering class includes a lot of people who will either not be able to meet the standards and flunk out, or who will drop out because they were never all that committed to begin with. Other schools have tougher admissions criteria and only admit those students who demonstrate a high probability of graduation. Such schools turn away a lot of applicants, but those who get accepted have a high proability of actually graduating.

    Also, some schools only are primarily concerned with achieving a high pass rate on the NCLEX exam for first-time takers and will flunk out anyone who has trouble taking such tests. Other schools will work more with struggling students, knowing that they might take 2 or 3 tries to pass NCLEX, but allowing them to graduate anyway.

    So ... you really have to look at your own situation. Are you a good student who is very likely to pass all of your classes? Are you committed enough to stick with it if and when you hit a few rough patches in the road? Does your particular school help students who are struggling? What is the graduation rate of your particular school? Do you have your finances in order to see you through graduation? etc.

    It's only when you look at the specifics of your situation that you can adequately assess it. And remember ... a good assessment is the first step of the nursing process.
  5. by   allthingsbright
    Im worried too-I think it must be normal. Esp. after hearing all kinds of "war" stories :chuckle !

    As far as A&P goes, I had a study group, and I also went to a tutoring-lab after hours. Flash cards also really helped me. Repetition, rhyms, and all kinds of word tricks worked for me-I pulled an 89 (B). And, I was quite happy with that.

    Best of luck!
    Amy
  6. by   suzy253
    I won't quit. They'll have to throw me out, kicking, screaming, spitting, etc. :chuckle
  7. by   julieftRN
    My school has a 30% graduation rate. That is pretty scary.
  8. by   CSLee3
    Is QUIT a word?
    You go suzy.......................Chuck
  9. by   tmiller027
    The nurses I work with told me at the community college here, they have a fairly high dropout rate, like 10 to 20 percent.

    At the private school i"m going to now though, I've been told they have a VERY low drop out rate, around 1 or 2 percent. I think part of that is, the private school has tougher admisson requirements, and costs $15,000 a year as opposed to $3000 a year. Most of us figure if we're paying that kind of money, to go the distance.
  10. by   Euskadi1946
    Quote from llg
    The figures on people dropping out and/or flunking out vary widely from school to school and depend on a variety of factors. For example, some schools accept all students who meet a certain minimum standard of academic performance -- even though those students may have to wait a few semesters for "their turn" to start actually taking the nursing courses. With such "generous" admission standards, entering class includes a lot of people who will either not be able to meet the standards and flunk out, or who will drop out because they were never all that committed to begin with. Other schools have tougher admissions criteria and only admit those students who demonstrate a high probability of graduation. Such schools turn away a lot of applicants, but those who get accepted have a high proability of actually graduating.

    Also, some schools only are primarily concerned with achieving a high pass rate on the NCLEX exam for first-time takers and will flunk out anyone who has trouble taking such tests. Other schools will work more with struggling students, knowing that they might take 2 or 3 tries to pass NCLEX, but allowing them to graduate anyway.

    So ... you really have to look at your own situation. Are you a good student who is very likely to pass all of your classes? Are you committed enough to stick with it if and when you hit a few rough patches in the road? Does your particular school help students who are struggling? What is the graduation rate of your particular school? Do you have your finances in order to see you through graduation? etc.

    It's only when you look at the specifics of your situation that you can adequately assess it. And remember ... a good assessment is the first step of the nursing process.
    I was dropped from my nursing program twice and was ready to throw the towel in until my family and a couple of wonderful instructors encouraged me to hang in there. My class was the last to do NCLEX on paper and pencil. I passed NCLEX on the first try!!!!!!!!!!!!! There was no way I was going back to nursing school.
  11. by   Chevelle
    Quote from suzy253
    I won't quit. They'll have to throw me out, kicking, screaming, spitting, etc. :chuckle
    I hear you there!! After everything it takes just to get into nursing school, you would think most of the ones who won't make it would be weeded out already! I would never be able to look at myself in the mirror again if I ever walked away from it. Not after all the effort I have put forth just to get in! (Well, if I'm in-still waiting but it looks hopeful!)
  12. by   TiffyRN
    When I went to nursing school nobody really "quit". There were a few students the first semester that technically quit on advice from the staff because their average in the class was so low they would have to nearly ace the final just to pass. The school looked more favorably on readmitting people who had withdrawn vs. failed a semester. The overall failure/quit rate was about 30% and it was a public college. But no one that I remember really quit because it was too tough.
  13. by   Altra
    Quote from suzy253
    I won't quit. They'll have to throw me out, kicking, screaming, spitting, etc. :chuckle
    Yo go, Suzy ... I'm right there with ya. At this point I'm telling myself that I got this far, no stopping now!
  14. by   mattsmom81
    Nursing school was demanding 30 yrs ago and still is. Students left for many reasons: decided they weren't ready for the committment, got married (it wasn't allowed when I was a student), developed a health or family problem.

    My school was particular who they accepted so most who were there were academically prepared for the workload, they chose to leave for other reasons.

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