How do you pronounce "centimeter" ??? - page 3

by shermrn 5,437 Views | 46 Comments

Not a big deal but something that bothers me. I run into a lot of nurses who pronounce the word centimeter as sontimeter.... Read More


  1. 0
    I know med professionals who say "sontimeter," but for me, it's not rational to say sontimeter unless I'm also going to call 1 cent, 1 sont. So... centimeter.
    Last edit by Sadala on Nov 11, '12 : Reason: spelling
  2. 0
    I like "sont" but use "sent". I had a college professor who pronounced fetus as "fet-us" not as "feet-us". Drove me nuts.
  3. 0
    Cent-I-meter. I'm from Canada, but western Canada. One of my instructors was from Ontario, and she said sont-i-meter.
  4. 1
    "Sahn-uh-meter" - an attempt to pronounce centimeter in a pretentious manner that comes across as ignorant. This mispronounciation meme is rare, usually only found in OB nursing and a few southern regions.

    Of course, everyone knows better than to correct the pronounciation of an OB prof/preceptor/manager... so the mispronouciation survives into a new generation.
    MunoRN likes this.
  5. 0
    I say "cen-ti-meter." Some say sontimeter. Kind of like poTAYto, poTAHto, toMAYto, toMAHto...
  6. 0
    Quote from SummitAP
    "Sahn-uh-meter" - an attempt to pronounce centimeter in a pretentious manner that comes across as ignorant. This mispronounciation meme is rare, usually only found in OB nursing and a few southern regions.

    Of course, everyone knows better than to correct the pronounciation of an OB prof/preceptor/manager... so the mispronouciation survives into a new generation.
    Haha! Perfect definition. I am from Florida, born and raised, and had never heard anyone say "sahnometer" until I took Microbiology as a prerequisite. My professor said it that way. And now all of my nursing instructors say it too. It drives me NUTS. It isn't even spelled close to that trying-to-be-fancy pronunciation.
  7. 0
    Interestingly, the metric system (including the centimeter) originated in France, so it really is "sont-i-meter" (there is a "T" sound in that) in the first place. Really liking word origins, I stick to that. (I also say, "Gee (hard g, like in gut)-yawn- bar-ray," not "g(hard g)illy-ann barray" for Guillain-Barre ( can't type the accent on the e), because that's French too.)

    I remember going from one coast to the other and back again and hearing "an-jye-nah" at one and "an-j'nuh" in the other, and having people look at me funny if I used the "wrong" one after having gotten used to it on the other side. I finally just went to saying, "An-jye-nah or an-j'nuh, depending on whether your physician went to Stanford or Harvard." Got a laugh and defused the hoity-toities.
  8. 0
    Only ones I've heard use the "sontimeter" pronunciation were nursing instructors who were pushing 60yo. Everywhere else it's been "centimeter".

    In spite of Michigan's proximity to French-speaking Canada, I grew up saying, "centimeter" on the rare occasion that the metric system was used.
  9. 0
    I resemble that age group, although there are still some of us out here who don't have formal teaching jobs. I am assuming you're making this descriptor pejorative, but please correct me if I'm jumping to take offense too easily.

    Maybe more of us older folks have broader educations in the liberal arts For which I make no apology.

    And I went to a college mumblemumble years ago where we were taught in metric. Perhaps the hospitals here are more progressive than they are in Michigan. Eh?
    Last edit by GrnTea on Nov 12, '12 : Reason: Thanks for pointing out my typo!
  10. 1
    sont sounds pretentious to me, but I really don't care. I have bigger fish to fry
    GrnTea likes this.


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