How do you really feel about 5-star rooms?

  1. Our hospital has new "5-star" rooms (you know with a chef, etc.) What is your reaction to this type of thing and "how does it make you feel"? I'd really like to know what other nurses think about it because my first reaction was not a positive one. THANKS!
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  2. 94 Comments

  3. by   VivaLasViejas
    It smells like elitism to me.........one type of care for the rich who can afford it, and another type of care for everyone else. I couldn't work in an environment like that; every patient deserves the best care I can give, no matter who they are or what their income level is.

    I've said before that some patients treat nurses in such a fashion, that the major difference between nurses and the average waitress is about $20 an hour. While it may be easier physically to work in a "5-Star" hospital unit (presumably with a much lower nurse-to-patient ratio), I personally would feel degraded, as the unspoken assumption would be that the nurse is basically a highly-paid servant, to be literally at these patients' beck and call. No, thanks!
  4. by   z's playa
    Sounds toatally ridiculous to me. If you're that picky, and you actually CARE that your room was equiped with all that at the time of hospitalization, methinks you aren't sick enough to be there. If you're only there for a 24 hour period, then its not worth it either. I'm sure the people who can afford this room can afford home nursing as well.

    My opinion.

  5. by   llg
    Certainly I believe that all patients deserve "good care" regardless of their ability to pay ... and I can understand that some people resent those special services for people who wish to spend more money for them.

    However, I can also understand the other side of the argument. If I have worked hard all my life and have lots of money and chose to spend it on making a hospital stay more comfortable for myself or for someone I love ... why shouldn't I be allowed to purchase those services? And if a hospital can make money by selling those services ... and make additional money from the charitable contributions those wealthy people donate --- money that is spent to provide better services for everybody -- then, why shouldn't a hospital offer those services?

    It only makes sense. People forget that the money gained by the hospital is used to help everybody.

    Also, my parents have both died in the past few years. When they were in the hospital (and money was not a problem), I wanted them to have the best care possible -- including a few frills and a little pampering that might not have been necessary and covered by insurance, but would make their last days more pleasant and bearable. There is nothing wrong with that.

    llg
  6. by   Truly_Blessed
    So who gets to stay in the 5 star rooms? Can people on medicaid stay in those rooms? If you have no insurance at all can you stay in those rooms? Haaaaaaaaaaa! I have never heard of anything like this ever. And I will never want to work somewhere where they have something like this. Patients are patients; none better than the other, all of them needing help. Strange, wow, never heard of that before. A chef? woah.
  7. by   rollingstone
    I don't feel one way or the other about it. It's just another way for the hospital to enhance revenue.
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I am not impressed. I think when it comes to medical care, everyone should be afforded the same services. If they want 5 star rooms, they need to shag butt to a hotel.
  9. by   Spidey's mom
    Well, I'm a firm believer in a free market system. If someone wants to pay for 5 star service, so be it.

    There is a private hospital nearby that was started by a physician who wanted to give his patients great care without all the hoops to jump through . . . . he is a 5 star surgeon, treats his nurses really well, actually all his staff. Pay and benefits are great.

    I don't see the downside . . . .

    steph
  10. by   mattsmom81
    Good Lord...now I've heard it all. <sigh> What is this world coming to.
  11. by   llg
    I think it is very interesting that people who espouse respect for everybody, different cultures, meeting everyone's needs, etc. sometimes have no problem being critical of the needs of the wealthy. People who are accustomed to living at a high socio-economic level should not have to sacrifice their socio-cultural needs any more than people who have cultural needs based on ethnicity or religion. But somehow, even among "caring" people, it is OK to "bash" them for having those needs.

    There is nothing wrong with being rich ... and nothing wrong for wanting to purchase a few luxeries in times of stress. And hospitals who can fulfill those needs are simply being smart to offer those services. Who do you think pays for a lot of the basic services available to poor people? The poor people don't pay for it all themselves. Many things are available to poor people because some rich person either provided the hospital with a profit that could be used to cover the loss that occurred by providing care for the poor person ... or some rich people made a charitable donation. Without rich patients, a hospital doesn't have the money to provide good care to poor people.

    llg
    Last edit by llg on May 17, '04
  12. by   purplemania
    hate the whole idea. We finally had to remodel them as we needed the extra beds. Nurses hated being made to feel that they had to treat someone differently and the worst was the visitors who thought Momma was paying for a private duty nurse.
  13. by   LilStudent
    I think the idea is a bit ridiculous. A hospital is a place to heal, not a place to be pampered. If they want personal chefs and such they should head to the nearest full service spa resort after they leave the hospital. Just my opinion.
  14. by   eak16
    Quote from llg
    I think it is very interesting that people who espouse respect for everybody, different cultures, meeting everyone's needs, etc. sometimes have no problem being critical of the needs of the wealthy. People who are accustomed to living at a high socio-economic level should not have to sacrifice their socio-cultural needs any more than people who have cultural needs based on ethnicity or religion. But somehow, even among "caring" people, it is OK to "bash" them for having those needs.

    There is nothing wrong with being rich ... and nothing wrong for wanting to purchase a few luxeries in times of stress. And hospitals who can fulfill those needs are simply being smart to offer those services. Who do you think pays for a lot of the basic services available to poor people? The poor people don't pay for it all themselves. Many things are available to poor people because some rich person either provided the hospital with a profit that could be used to cover the loss that occurred by providing care for the poor person ... or some rich people made a charitable donation. Without rich patients, a hospital doesn't have the money to provide good care to poor people.

    llg
    since when did having a personal chef become a "need"? Is bringing in their poodle a need too? Some people have more money than others. More often than not this is a result of good luck or bad luck as to where and to whom they were born. The good news about this is that all humans have the same basic needs- read up on Maslows if you cant remember- and ascribing needs to one group of paitents and not to another based on economics is absurd.

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