How do you really feel about 5-star rooms? - page 6

Our hospital has new "5-star" rooms (you know with a chef, etc.) What is your reaction to this type of thing and "how does it make you feel"? I'd really like to know what other nurses think about... Read More

  1. by   Stitchie
    Quote from crankyasanoldma
    I like our 5 star rooms and always volunteer (as do many others at my institution) to take care of the patients there.

    I give the same care to the "5 star" patient as I do the the uninsured one in a shared room down the hall. The only difference in my day is that I will perform some nursing duties in a spacious, visually appealing room, and some in a standard room that day.

    As far as THIS nurse is concerned, the 5 star patient has wasted their extra money on me, and is paying for things like a fancy headboard and an extra couch and painting to see. Room service food delivery is free to all our patients anyway.

    I'm hoping that the extra they pay will help cover costs for the uninsured one down the hall, and I don't have a problem with that at all.
    Good point. I hadn't thought of them as contributing to the bottom line for their extra services, but with lower ratios and private rooms it will be a $$$ load for them to carry.

    If that's the case then bring it on; I care for my patients equally but I still want to know how the 5-star hospital can get around an EMTALA law. I'm assuming, of course, that there is an ER and must therefore comply with existing law.
  2. by   mattsmom81
    I cannot imagine a hospital that will not pressure nurses to 'do more' for the wealthier, more influential patients...they do already and I don't buy into it now. My shift is a constant prioritizing exercise...trying to take care of the most basic needs of critically ill patients...catering to whims is on the bottom of my list.

    I have no grudge against wealthy people. Only to the extent that they may think they 'own' me as a nurse to service their whims. There is a huge difference between the 'needs' of my ill patients across the board, and the 'wants' of patients...whether they are rich or poor, IMO. And if those needs and wants aren't in line with my duty I am likely to put them low on the priority list as well. Hotel service worker I am NOT.

    I know nurses who like to work with wealthy clients...but they generally assume a little different nursing role, by their accounts. If they're willing, fine...however I am not compromising my professional status to that of a servant because some '5 star' facility tells me its my job now to do so.

    Seems the industry is reinventing my professional role every few decades, but I'm still the same professional nurse I was 27 yrs ago. I like it that way and still maintain I will define my practice within the confines of my NPA. Stubborn old curmudgeon nurse?? Maybe. Guess when I can't stomach any more 'reinventing' of my role, I will retire to Walmart greeting.
  3. by   nurseygrrl
    Quote from mattsmom81
    I cannot imagine a hospital that will not pressure nurses to 'do more' for the wealthier, more influential patients...they do already and I don't buy into it now. My shift is a constant prioritizing exercise...trying to take care of the most basic needs of critically ill patients...catering to whims is on the bottom of my list.

    I have no grudge against wealthy people. Only to the extent that they may think they 'own' me as a nurse to service their whims. There is a huge difference between the 'needs' of my ill patients across the board, and the 'wants' of patients...whether they are rich or poor, IMO. And if those needs and wants aren't in line with my duty I am likely to put them low on the priority list as well. Hotel service worker I am NOT.

    I know nurses who like to work with wealthy clients...but they generally assume a little different nursing role, by their accounts. If they're willing, fine...however I am not compromising my professional status to that of a servant because some '5 star' facility tells me its my job now to do so.

    Seems the industry is reinventing my professional role every few decades, but I'm still the same professional nurse I was 27 yrs ago. I like it that way and still maintain I will define my practice within the confines of my NPA. Stubborn old curmudgeon nurse?? Maybe. Guess when I can't stomach any more 'reinventing' of my role, I will retire to Walmart greeting.
    Great post!
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from mjlrn97
    It smells like elitism to me.........one type of care for the rich who can afford it, and another type of care for everyone else. I couldn't work in an environment like that; every patient deserves the best care I can give, no matter who they are or what their income level is.

    I've said before that some patients treat nurses in such a fashion, that the major difference between nurses and the average waitress is about $20 an hour. While it may be easier physically to work in a "5-Star" hospital unit (presumably with a much lower nurse-to-patient ratio), I personally would feel degraded, as the unspoken assumption would be that the nurse is basically a highly-paid servant, to be literally at these patients' beck and call. No, thanks!
    I agree, totally!
  5. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from crankyasanoldma
    I like our 5 star rooms and always volunteer (as do many others at my institution) to take care of the patients there.

    I give the same care to the "5 star" patient as I do the the uninsured one in a shared room down the hall. The only difference in my day is that I will perform some nursing duties in a spacious, visually appealing room, and some in a standard room that day.

    As far as THIS nurse is concerned, the 5 star patient has wasted their extra money on me, and is paying for things like a fancy headboard and an extra couch and painting to see. Room service food delivery is free to all our patients anyway.

    I'm hoping that the extra they pay will help cover costs for the uninsured one down the hall, and I don't have a problem with that at all.

    How do the pts treat you and your fellow nurses in the 5 star unit?

    Are there some type of personal service employees there, so that nurses aren't expected to step into that role?
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on May 19, '04
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    We have some of these rooms. They go to hospital management, Hollywood stars, and their families. Same mixture of very nice and rediculous behavior as poor fols and homeless patients.

    They don't increase floor staff so these patients get the same care as any other patient would according to the assessment made by the RN assigned.

    Our practice committee got the hardwood and tapestry chairs out of the VIP patient rooms in favor of ones that can be disinfected. Most patients want and need the same kind, competent, effective nursing care.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on May 19, '04 : Reason: typos
  7. by   Brickman
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    The optional services wouldn't be fair, because it's quite obvious that it'll take money to purchase them. Put an EO (Equal Opportunity) stamp on it, an income sliding scale, then we'll see how well it goes. Unless that happens, it'll never be fair.
    Does this go for the Mercedes dealership also? I can't for the life of me see how forcing people with money to do without services that they are happy to pay for is fair.
  8. by   nurseygrrl
    We're talking about healthcare here...which in my opinion, is a basic human right. I don't think that having money entitles one to better service when it comes to healthcare.
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    A single standard of care I think we need. I a patient (more likely family) wants to pay for lobster instead of sole, fine. All need safe, therapeutic, effective, and compassionate care.
    Debra Berger outlines the needs in the article.
    Frills? OK! No problem.

    http://cna.igc.org/calnurseoctnov03/thetime.html

    Now is the time ... 'The nurses' proposal for Universal Healthcare & a single standard of care'


    The following is the address by newly-elected CNA President Deborah Burger, RN to the September 16 rally in downtown Oakland, Ca. in connection with the CNA Centennial Celebration.

    The California Nurses Association has advocated for a national healthcare system for over two decades. The staff nurse leadership made "single-payer" it's foremost political priority and in 1994 co-sponsored Proposition 186.

    This year, CNA endorsed House Resolution 655, the Conyers Bill, which would establish a national healthcare system based upon a single standard of care.

    We are here today in front of the Federal Building named after Ronald Dellums, a life-long champion for universal healthcare. We join this namesake as champions to say: now is the time for a national healthcare system.

    We are champions for a system that meets the needs of our patients.

    We are champions for replacing the corporate healthcare industry with a publicly-financed, democratically administered healthcare system.

    Above all, we are champions for a single standard of care for all our patients.

    We are champions because everyday RNs confront the neglect of the dysfunctional healthcare industry:
    * Uninsured patients arriving in ERs with advanced illnesses and diseases that could have been treated easily and cost-effectively in clinics, if they had healthcare coverage;

    * Families in distress over where their loved-one will go to recover because their health insurance has run out and they cannot afford to pay for hospital care;

    * Hospitals that provide elaborately decorated rooms, concierge services, private nurses to VIPs, as their ERs overflow with uninsured working people who wait hours for care;

    * HMO increase premiums that skyrocket as employers shift the cost of healthcare to employees.
    In short, RNs are on the front-lines dealing with an industry that rations care based on the ability to pay. Many patients are uninsured, in fact 44.3 million Americans are without health insurance; other patients are underinsured, who do not have coverage for prescription drugs or routine exams or must pay a portion of in-patient hospital costs. The result is patients who receive different levels of care, different intensities of treatment, different access to pharmaceuticals, and the outright denial of treatment.

    To the corporate CEO's, this rationing of care by the healthcare industry is business as usual. To RNs, these are our patients, who lose a limb because of untreated diabetes, who can't work because they can't afford a by-pass operation, a retiree who can't buy drugs to treat their high blood pressure.

    So where does all the money go that patients pay as insurance premiums? As the New York Times reported this week, employees are paying 48 percent more for insurance than they did three years ago, and 2003 was a very good year for the managed care industry.

    According to a recent study by the IHSP, the value of US HMO mergers and acquisitions was over $78 billion between 1993-2002; US hospitals profits between 1986-2000 were $194 billion; In 1993-2002, US hospitals mergers and acquisitions were worth $133 billion; pharmaceutical mergers were worth $457 billion; the top 20 pharmaceutical corporations combined profits, in the most recently reported year, were $60.7 billion.

    As RNs, this outrageous diversion of healthcare dollars from patient care to corporate profiteering cannot continue. Our patients cannot afford the costs of the healthcare industry.

    So we must act. We must advocate. We must demand: A Single Standard of Care.
    As Registered Nurses, it is time for us to speak out for what we know is right for our patients. This is the RN vision for national healthcare, based upon A Single Standard of Care:
    * Guaranteed benefits for the entire family
    * No bills and no out-of-pocket expenses
    * Access to quality healthcare regardless of employment status
    * Choice of doctors, hospitals and other providers
    A Single Standard of Care would cover equally for ever patient:
    * Doctor visits, hospitalization and access to specialists
    * Dental, vision and mental health care
    * Prescription drugs and medical supplies
    * Quality nursing home and long-term care
    * Occupational health, preventive and rehabilitative services
    Everyone, regardless of employment status or income would have healthcare coverage. When necessary they could simply walk into a medical office, hospital or clinic and receive care. Instead of the hundreds of different insurance plans existing, one publicly funded plan would:
    * Guarantee one standard of care for everyone
    * Cover all residents in the country
    * Provide comprehensive services
    * Ensure public control and accountability
    The cost of providing universal comprehensive, "single-payer" healthcare would actually be much less than under the current system: no insurance companies to take a cut for profits and marketing and no reason for employers to cancel policies or make employees pay more, over-burdening the public health system that must provide care to the uninsured.

    Employers would actually pay less into a publicly-funded system than to HMOs and insurance companies, whose premiums increase dramatically every year.

    In a national system that provides care based on need, there would be limits on what drug companies can charge for pharmaceuticals, and limits on the ability of healthcare corporations to divert resources to expensive mergers and acquisitions.

    For decades the major insurance companies, hospital corporations and HMOs have successfully derailed every attempt to create a fair and just healthcare system for our country.

    Today we will hear from an Australian RN leader about the crucial role RNs play in defending public health services in New South Wales and how they must continually defend their national healthcare system from conservative attacks; from Maine, we learn that RNs are crucial to that state's effort to achieve universal healthcare, and from a Hawaiian staff nurse leader we will hear about how a private insurance based approach that relies on employer mandate cannot achieve a single standard of care.
    As Registered Nurses on the frontline of healthcare delivery, we are all committed to winning A Single Standard of Care for All.
  10. by   redwinggirlie
    Why do we need to think we have to differentiate between rich and poor? It may bite me in the ... someday, but my patients are all the same to me. They need me, our techs and all of our expertise. In that regard, ALL of my patients are in five star rooms already. Good for them.
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    ALL our patients are VIPs because they are cared for by US!
  12. by   crankyasanoldma
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    How do the pts treat you and your fellow nurses in the 5 star unit?

    Are there some type of personal service employees there, so that nurses aren't expected to step into that role?
    The patients there are like all the others- some are demanding and some are pleasures.

    All our 5 stars get is a fancy room. The housekeeper empties their trash, cleans and mops- just like she does in all the other rooms. My care is the same as is the staffing. Room service is standard in our hopsital, but the 5 stars have fancier trays. Any problems would be handled by out patient advocate- just like any other room.

    I don't see any difference in care or service between rooms.
  13. by   Tweety
    A coworker floated down to another unit, their they are sucking up the neurosurgeons giving their patients 4:1 nursing and private rooms. (We don't have 5 star rooms here.)

    They told her "they are the bread and butter of this unit, please treat them with extra TLC". I'm sorry, I can't support that idea. I wonder how their other patients are treated?

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