How Did a BSN Help Your Career (Or Not) - page 2

Please ... this is NOT an ADN vs. BSN thread. I don't want to go there. I am merely asking BSN nurses if they feel the bachelor's provided more career opportunities, or not. If so, what kind of... Read More

  1. by   mom and nurse
    I had a previous Bachelor's degree and actually was accepted to an ADN and BSN program. I had 5 kids at home and the BSN program was closer. So I attended the BSN program (also since they accepted several credits from my previous Bachelor's degree I'd only need to take the science, a nutrition and a statistic class for prerequisites to the nursing program)

    Turns out I'm really glad I decided to get the BSN. It seems to be opening more doors for me ....for example I know that to work as a Community Health Nurse in our area you must have a BSN. Many posters mentioned about jobs that say "BSN only". The nurse manager at my job is a BSN nurse, the director has an MSN.

    And now I'm back in school getting the MSN so I'm especially glad I already had the BSN (the school I attend also has an RN to MSN program for ADNs). I want to one day not have to work weekends, holidays, evenings and have 6 or 7 patients at a time, etc. etc. and I'm hoping the MSN will help me in this goal....

    There are many job openings for ADN and BSN nurses in the metropolitan area where I work. The BSN nurses have more flexibility about where they work.
  2. by   Tweety
    I know this is not what you're asking, but I was denied a job in my facility that I felt qualified for based on my 14 years with the organization as an ADN RN, but was turned down for lack of a BSN. I wasn't bitter, but I was disappointed, because I thought "what's the BSN going to change?".
  3. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Tweety
    I know this is not what you're asking, but I was denied a job in my facility that I felt qualified for based on my 14 years with the organization as an ADN RN, but was turned down for lack of a BSN. I wasn't bitter, but I was disappointed, because I thought "what's the BSN going to change?".
    Actually, that is what I'm asking also. These responses are great ... thanks.

    :typing
  4. by   pegbord
    By the time I finished my pre-nursing requisits, I had obtained Associate degree in science. Two year ADN program vs two years to complete BSN .... just made more sense to me to get BSN since the time to complete both programs was the same -- and BSN provides broader range of opportunities. I applied to both ADN and BSN. Would have gladly attended ADN program had I not been accepted to the BSN program . . . end result is RN and that is the goal.
  5. by   suni
    I was 52 years old when I finished my BSN, and it does open more doors. Many hospitals are seeking magnet status and degree prepared nurses are one of the things that they seek out. I have moved into an Education job and this is much less physical on me. I also made valuable contacts through out the hospital while working on my degree/ Side benefit, in my state, I can substitute teach with this degree.
  6. by   BeccaznRN
    Quote from pegbord
    By the time I finished my pre-nursing requisits, I had obtained Associate degree in science. Two year ADN program vs two years to complete BSN .... just made more sense to me to get BSN since the time to complete both programs was the same -- and BSN provides broader range of opportunities. I applied to both ADN and BSN. Would have gladly attended ADN program had I not been accepted to the BSN program . . . end result is RN and that is the goal.
    This is why I also obtained a BSN over an ADN. I was accepted to the BSN program on the first try, and it was only two years long since I had already completed the first two years of prereqs at the CC. It was actually less time to get that degree than to do the ADN at the CC, where I was waitlisted. I'm actually kind of glad it worked out that way, after reading these posts! I want to have as many doors open as possible.
  7. by   sldrn2b
    Do you all believe that everything happens for a reason? I just logged on and was anticipating finding information about a BSN and decided that I was going to check this site first. The question that was asked was great and the answers are what I needed to make my decision to move forward.
    Thanks to all of you. I hope you have a merry christmas and a happy new year.
  8. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Also, for those who are currently working on their BSN, why did you decide to pursue it?
    I want to become a midwife and you have to have a BSN or a Bachelors in another field with an RN. Since I was not a nurse yet, and did not have a bachelors in another field, I figured it was best to get my bachelors in the field I was wanting to get my masters in...
  9. by   RN34TX
    This thread has been very informative...I wish I would have started a similar one myself before because I ask some of the same questions as Lizz does.
    Thank you Lizz for starting this one!

    I'm in a BSN program now and really have no idea why I'm here and doing it.
    I have no desire to be a manager and no desire to go on to grad school to become a CRNA or NP.

    My pay increase will be minimal at best for all of the hard work I've put into getting my BSN (which by the way is a Magnet hospital who wants BSN's yet fail to put out the money for them...what's new)

    All I know is that as an LPN/LVN, I needed my RN because over the years I saw way too many cycles of "We're getting rid of LPN/LVN's and going all RN" and felt my job was in jeopardy much of the time and that the only thing left for me were bad nursing homes and med/surg jobs with 9-10 patient assignments.

    Now as an RN I'm paranoid once again thinking that the good jobs are going to squeeze out everyone but the BSN's, so back to school I go again.

    I don't know if a BSN will ever pay off for me in terms of time and effort spent on pursuing it, but I can't complain because my employer pays 100% up front (no stupid tuition reimbursement crap) tuition, books, and even extra paid time off so I'd be a fool not to do it.

    But again, I have no idea what I'm going to do with it, if anything.
  10. by   Nurse_Diane
    Quote from lizz
    Also, for those who are currently working on their BSN, why did you decide to pursue it?

    - More opportunities for advancement
    - Stepping stone (possibly) to grad school.

    Happy Holidays!
    Diane:Snowman1:
  11. by   bshaw96
    I am an ADN just getting started on pursuing my BSN. I've had my ADN for 10 years, and NEVER thought I'd go back for the BSN. Didn't see the point. When I first went to nursing school, I didn't have the luxury of ADN or BSN. I was 19, and did not qualify for a scholarship. My mom was a single mom and it was all we could do to pay for the community college program. Kinda ironic though, took me 3 1/2 years to finish my ADN b/c it took 1 1/2 years to get in, lol. Anyway, after 10 years, I've had my feel of floor nursing. I do not want to be doing this in 10 more years. I have been looking for other jobs which are more condusive to family/church life, but they all have that
    "BSN required or preferred" behind it. I don't really see it making me a better nurse. I'm already a great nurse . But the reality is employers more and more want at least a BSN on the name badge. The program I'm doing is online and not very expensive, so I thought "Why not!"
  12. by   smk1
    Also wanted to add that there are no BSN programs available near me except private colleges (27k per year, no thanks!). There is RN-BSN at the university that i would like to attend so I spent my prereq time busting out all the transfer classes needed to transfer after ADN. Should only take about 1 year fulltime, ao it seems worth it to get it over with.
  13. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RN34TX
    I don't know if a BSN will ever pay off for me in terms of time and effort spent on pursuing it, but I can't complain because my employer pays 100% up front (no stupid tuition reimbursement crap) tuition, books, and even extra paid time off so I'd be a fool not to do it.
    That's great. With most of these hospitals they'll pay $2K to $3K a year but that's it so you pretty much have to pay for some of the costs or spread the courses over four years, if you can do that.

    :typing

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