Help me, I am African Amercian male nurse

  1. I hope this title does not scare anyone away or upset anyone. My goal is to find out how AA male nurses (LPN, ASN, BSN, or NP) deal with various challenges like dealing with female nurses (older or younger) on the floor, dealing with other ethincally diverse population of male nurses and doctors, racism if any on the floor, differences with wages and work performance, and balancing family time (for the married men with one wife and children). How do you respond and resolve conflict bet. two other coworkers? Bet. you and coworker? I also want to know from other nurses who are not of African-descent their truthful work experience with AA male nurses. THIS IS NOT A DEBATE BET. RACIAL GROUPS OR SHOULD IT START ANY RACIAL BIAS but information on experiences with culturally diverse community of nurses.
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  2. 26 Comments

  3. by   EmmaG
    One of the smartest, most compassionate and professional nurses I've ever worked with was a young man from Africa. He was scary smart lol. Taught me alot. I never had a female patient complain to me about not wanting him as their nurse. In fact, many requested him to care for them.

    He just oozed confidence and competence and empathy, and the patients quickly picked up on that. Awesome guy.
  4. by   CHATSDALE
    i don't really see the diference between working with nurses of different gender, race
    be the best nuse you can be and if someone else has some problems let them deal with it
    i have worked with nurses of all cultural differences and i have worked with some horrid nurses and i have worked with some absolutely intelligent hardworking nurses and i have never noticed that race or gender had much to do with either
    don't take offence when it may be someones lousy disposition is just as bad toward anyone standing in front of them
    welcome to the board, if you are a new nurse welcome to the profession
    if you are a new nurse one thing..i know that when you have the responsiblity of a family it is alway easy to accept overtime assignments but don't lose sight that the most important thing is your family, don't allow yourself to become burn out.
  5. by   lvnandmomx3
    Before becoming a nurse, I worked in the ER and we had 3 AA male nurses,and 3 other male nurses (ethnicity unknown) and they were all great nurses. I did not notice any difference. This only imo though I am not a male nor AA.
  6. by   CaLLaCoDe
    All I can say is the AA male nurses I have worked with have been competent, professional, kind and respectful. That's is all I ask of my coworkers. I am fortunate that at my place of work the workers are of diverse racial and cultural backgrounds which is our hospital's strength. So to treat anyone differently than anyone else due to race is unacceptable and not using your head to do what you are paid to do, take care of patients the best that you can!
  7. by   Jolie
    The first unit in which I worked as a new grad was a large NICU in a teaching/referral center. On any given shift, we were staffed with 20+ RNs, 5-6 physicians (residents and attendings), and 2 or 3 nurse practitioners. The staff was huge and incredibly diverse: women and men from every imaginable racial, ethnic and religious background. It was an interesting place to work, especially for me, having grown up in a rural community that was almost 100% white and Christian. I gained an appreciation for traditions and beliefs that most people in my little town will never know or experience.

    If you have any concerns or misgivings about entering a mostly female and mostly white profession, I would highly suggest seeking out a large teaching or referral hospital in a big city where you will experience great diversity.

    Good luck!
  8. by   EmmaG
    Quote from Jolie
    The first unit in which I worked as a new grad was a large NICU in a teaching/referral center. On any given shift, we were staffed with 20+ RNs, 5-6 physicians (residents and attendings), and 2 or 3 nurse practitioners. The staff was huge and incredibly diverse: women and men from every imaginable racial, ethnic and religious background. It was an interesting place to work, especially for me, having grown up in a rural community that was almost 100% white and Christian. I gained an appreciation for traditions and beliefs that most people in my little town will never know or experience.

    If you have any concerns or misgivings about entering a mostly female and mostly white profession, I would highly suggest seeking out a large teaching or referral hospital in a big city where you will experience great diversity.

    Good luck!
    I experienced what you describe in the smallest hospital I've ever worked (only 3 floors--- PCU, med/surg/onc, surg, plus an ICU). People on staff from all over the world, it was incredible. And you could always find an interpreter for almost any language lol. They were wonderful people to work with
  9. by   TheCommuter
    I am a black female nurse. Please click on the link below, as it is a very recent thread regarding the unique issues being faced by nurses of color.

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f8/its-s...nt-246421.html
  10. by   leslie :-D
    i occasionally work w/an aa male nurse, who is gentle, sensitive and highly competent.
    no issues in our workplace.

    leslie
  11. by   sharann
    Just be a decent person and do a good job. There is only one culture, the human one that needs care. If we have the ability, staffing, time to be culturally sensetive as it is opften put, then we go for it. I am a Jewish American nurse and I am in the minority in my hospital and profession. Doesn't bother me because I don't think about it. I am a nurse, I am human, end of story. Good luck
  12. by   SuesquatchRN
    I don't work with any African American nurses nor male nurses. I don't work with any African Americans, period. In fact, I go weeks without seeing any one of any color except pink.

    We've got all kinds of diversity up here. We have Protestants AND Catholics.

  13. by   Cosper123
    Quote from PurifiedH2O
    I hope this title does not scare anyone away or upset anyone. My goal is to find out how AA male nurses (LPN, ASN, BSN, or NP) deal with various challenges like dealing with female nurses (older or younger) on the floor, dealing with other ethincally diverse population of male nurses and doctors, racism if any on the floor, differences with wages and work performance, and balancing family time (for the married men with one wife and children). How do you respond and resolve conflict bet. two other coworkers? Bet. you and coworker? I also want to know from other nurses who are not of African-descent their truthful work experience with AA male nurses. THIS IS NOT A DEBATE BET. RACIAL GROUPS OR SHOULD IT START ANY RACIAL BIAS but information on experiences with culturally diverse community of nurses.
    Firstly, why would the title scare anyone away or make them upset? My concern here is that you believe that being an African American or a male nurse gives you or others the need to be wary of something.

    As for how to deal with female nurses...deal with them as professionals.

    As for how to respond to and resolve conflict...do it as an adult (and again, a professional).

    I work with two AA male nurses and they don't appear to have any problems with anything. One on them I socialise with outside of work (where we complain about certain issues, and conflict of race is often an issue...especially with how some of the patients treat him or me)...But he handles it just like I do. Just like my wife. Just like any other mature professional would.

    Would you like me to IM you his e-mail addy in case there is some secret strategy I am not aware of?
  14. by   Tweety
    I think for us as whites (and predominently female) to say "it's no problem where I am" isn't what he's looking for. It sounds to me like he wants to hear from other AA male nurses, a minority within a minority and I personally don't know how that feels, just because I happen to know an AA male nurse or two.

    Best wishes.

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