"The Good Ol' Days!" - page 9

by BostonTerrierLoverRN

26,588 Views | 149 Comments

I was blown away to find out student nurses could not be married during school, when one of my instructors went to a Public Charity Hospital based Diploma Nursing Program. I loved hearing about having to sterilize everything,... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from gitanorn
    unquestionably, you're totally correct, however that's the reason i didn't use the proper name cornette because of the "horns" i didn't want to offend anyone...just saying...
    yea, you give me the "horns" and we are going to have trouble! *lol*
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  2. 2
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    One thing nurses from the "old days", and one is including right though the 1980's in this, miss is the respect for authority patients and their familes had for nurses.

    Yea sure, there was always the odd patient who gave the nurses a hard time, but by and large they did as they were asked told.

    Nurse came in with meds or having to do a treatment? You didn't hear "I'm watching my stories/the game, come back later"

    Visitors didn't have to be told one thousand times *do not sit on the beds*. You asked them once and that was usually that. If there was a problem you got out the big guns (head or charge nurse) to have a word and that usually more often than not settled matters.
    I agree so much with that, Do Good Then Go. I hear younger people saying fairly often that nurses from my era "were handmaidens", expected to get the doctor a cup of coffee, etc. This was not so in my experience. Most people were respectful, even on the private "VIP" unit of our hospital. They went down to the cafeteria if they wanted a snack. They got out of the way when you walked toward the patient. You chose the words and the tone of voice you felt would be effective - based on your judgement . . .

    The "university of google" is a mixed blessing.

    As for doctors throwing charts, etc. -- my favorite (which I've told here before) was the afternoon when an OB doc had a tantrum of some sort and threw every single stick of furniture in his office out into the hallway. I worked near the Medical Director's office and saw a red-faced nurse scurrying down the hallway to alert him of the incident. "No way", thought I. We all knew he could be temperamental but this---?

    Dr S was the cool and collected type, so he didn't jump up and say "he whaaaat????". He just listened. After about 20 minutes he went and sauntered slowly by the wreckage -- I went up later and sure enough a mountain of jumbled furniture was piled up - chairs, bookshelves, the credenza, even the potted palm . . . There were still some patients in the hallway as well. Crazy, crazy place.
    Last edit by nursel56 on Apr 9, '12 : Reason: add quoted text
    OCNRN63 and BostonTerrierLoverRN like this.
  3. 5
    Quote from nursel56
    I agree so much with that, Do Good Then Go. I hear younger people saying fairly often that nurses from my era "were handmaidens", expected to get the doctor a cup of coffee, etc. This was not so in my experience. Most people were respectful, even on the private "VIP" unit of our hospital. They went down to the cafeteria if they wanted a snack. They got out of the way when you walked toward the patient. You chose the words and the tone of voice you felt would be effective - based on your judgement . . .

    The "university of google" is a mixed blessing.

    As for doctors throwing charts, etc. -- my favorite (which I've told here before) was the afternoon when an OB doc had a tantrum of some sort and threw every single stick of furniture in his office out into the hallway. I worked near the Medical Director's office and saw a red-faced nurse scurrying down the hallway to alert him of the incident. "No way", thought I. We all knew he could be temperamental but this---?

    Dr S was the cool and collected type, so he didn't jump up and say "he whaaaat????". He just listened. After about 20 minutes he went and sauntered slowly by the wreckage -- I went up later and sure enough a mountain of jumbled furniture was piled up - chairs, bookshelves, the credenza, even the potted palm . . . There were still some patients in the hallway as well. Crazy, crazy place.
    IMHO nurses and nursing staff are more of "handmaidens" today than they ever were back then. Between all this "client" and "customer" nonesense along with PG and customer service scores, many floor/unit nurses have been turned into glorified CS reps.

    Yea, back in the day you choose your words carefully, but the job got done. Some patients would go out of their way *not* to bother the "nurse" because she was so busy. They were compliant to the point you'd want to say "look, it's ok, this is my job and you're no trouble". Others you knew off the bat slathering them with sugar wasn't going anywere, so you took your tone and voice up a notch.

    Family members the same. They wanted ice and there wasn't an aide or nurse to spare? Point them towards the proper room (if permitted) and let them have at it. Now they want you to literally stop working on a code because their mother wants a glass of water *now*.
  4. 0
    "Chief of medicine cardioverting patients with carotid sinus massage. Cheaper than electricity. "

    They still do that
  5. 1
    I miss the Nursing caps. I know they must have been a pain in the butt to wear, but you knew from the cap what school the nurse went to, and if they were an RN or LPN. Getting caped was a big thing. It meant you were ready to nurse to practice what you were taught in the classroom, that now you belong to a caring group of people called nurses. At a then, well known 3 year nursing program, It was not uncommon to see the caped nurses cry. It meant that much. It meant that much for me. I didn't even get a cap and I cried. I miss the caps.
    Lavslady likes this.
  6. 5
    Quote from Merlyn
    I miss the caps.
    Nobody's stopping you from wearing one.
    applewhitern, SHGR, Vespertinas, and 2 others like this.
  7. 8
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Needle tips obviously would wear down with repeated use, so they had to be sharpened as part of routine maintenance, just as one does with cutting knives.
    It would be so much more impressive walking into a room with a needle and one of those stick things that comes with knives and doing the back and forth sharpening as you go.
  8. 0
    Quote from Merlyn
    I miss the Nursing caps. I know they must have been a pain in the butt to wear, but you knew from the cap what school the nurse went to, and if they were an RN or LPN. Getting caped was a big thing. It meant you were ready to nurse to practice what you were taught in the classroom, that now you belong to a caring group of people called nurses. At a then, well known 3 year nursing program, It was not uncommon to see the caped nurses cry. It meant that much. It meant that much for me. I didn't even get a cap and I cried. I miss the caps.
    Well unless your facility has a strict policy against wearing one, no one is stopping you from wearing a cap. Long as you stick to either one historically associated with the program you graduated from and or a generic version from Kay's, knock yourself out as they say! *LOL*

    While some places are putting nurses back into whites, at least on the floors requiring caps would cause open rebellion on the wards!
  9. 1
    Quote from wooh
    Nobody's stopping you from wearing one.
    Left yourself wide open for that one, lol!
    applewhitern likes this.
  10. 0
    I remember a world before bariatric sized equipment. Stretchers looked like ironing boards with wheels. Beds were hand cranked and sized small enough for a semi-private room.
    I do miss specific visiting hours.


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