For The Love Of All That Is Holy . . . . - page 4

"PT" means Physical Therapist. If you cannot bring yourself to type out "patient", the correct abbreviation is "pt". It's LOSE your license, not "loose" your license. I've seen this one so often... Read More

  1. by   la_chica_suerte85
    Quote from Not_A_Hat_Person
    Why is millennial-bashing still a thing?
    It is still a thing because rampant "Special Snowflake Syndrome" is leaving a massive blemish on the Millennial Generation.
  2. by   sevensonnets
    I go berserk over cloths instead of clothes, stripped shirts, yard sells, dinning tables, alot, awhile, ect. instead of etc., and then instead of than. Then there are people who turn up missing and those who are actively working threw there problems.
  3. by   sevensonnets
    I saw an obituary in the local paper for a man who was currently living in Chicago but was formally from Atlanta.
  4. by   Boomer MS, RN
    Then there are people who turn up missing and those who are actively working threw there problems.

  5. by   Palliative Care, DNP
    Please stop "orientated" one is oriented and is on orientation while orienting. One does not orientate

    We also do not "conversate". People converse with each other and have conversations.

    Irregardless is is also incorrect. The word is regardless. Irregardless literally is saying without regard without
  6. by   heron
    Quote from la_chica_suerte85
    It is still a thing because rampant "Special Snowflake Syndrome" is leaving a massive blemish on the Millennial Generation.
    Just as it did on genY-ers, genX-ers, boomers, The Greatest, and so on back. It's not a generational thing - it's a developmental stage, just like adolescence.

    End of de-rail ... carry on
  7. by   Boomer MS, RN
    Please RSVP. RSVP is French for "Repondez-vous s'il vous plait", literally "Respond please". So putting please in front of RSVP is redundant: Please respond please.
  8. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Horseshoe
    My pet peeve is apostrophe love.

    One doctor = doctor.

    More than one doctor = doctors.

    More than one doctor does NOT = doctor's.

    More than one patient does NOT = patient's.

    Are they just not teaching this anymore, or is this an auto correct thing?

    Don't even get me started on people with advanced degrees who don't understand when to use the words your versus you're, and there, their, and they're.
    People used to be taught proper grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc. in school. But these days, the teachers don't know proper usage because there are at least 2 or 3 generations of teachers whose teachers did not teach them proper usage.

    Read "The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America".
  9. by   doodlebuttRN
    Quote from applewhitern
    My pet peeve is "I could care less." No, it is "I could NOT care less." To say "I could care less" means that, yes indeed, you could actually care even less than you do now.
    applewhiteRN you beat me to it!! This one drives me crazy. My husband says it sometimes just to get under my skin. grrrrr
  10. by   roser13
    Quote from Palliative Care, DNP
    Please stop "orientated" one is oriented and is on orientation while orienting. One does not orientate

    We also do not "conversate". People converse with each other and have conversations.

    Irregardless is is also incorrect. The word is regardless. Irregardless literally is saying without regard without
    I used to believe the same about orientate. Unfortunately, it actually is a word and I have been corrected many times. I still hate it.
  11. by   chare
    Quote from Palliative Care, DNP
    Please stop "orientated" one is oriented and is on orientation while orienting. One does not orientate

    We also do not "conversate". People converse with each other and have conversations.

    Irregardless is is also incorrect. The word is regardless. Irregardless literally is saying without regard without
    While non-standard usage, both conversate and irregardless are real, and becoming more accepted. Having said that, I have to say that I completely agree with you as to all three.

    And while we're on the subject, whatever happened to the comma, particularly the Oxford comma.
  12. by   DeeAngel
    I hate people using passed instead of past. "He past by the house" vs "He passed by the house". There is no way anyone can "past by" anything.
  13. by   Roman1
    I see this one documented all the time "floor matt down and next to bed". It's floor mat. I always want to say, so you put Matt on the floor!

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