finally all is set to apply to RN program, worried to death..

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    when i finish this semester i will have all my prereqs completed so i will only have to take core nursing classes. i have more that enough points, good grades, and the campus that i want to apply to is a little over 30 from my home and the highways i take to get there are secondary roads, so there never crazy traffic in the morning.

    great right? but now i'm hearing really horrible stories about the instructors. basically the instructors are said to be sadistic, arrogant jerks, who will do everything to make you fail. none of the students feel that the instructors care or want them to succeed.
    one 3 semester student said that his class is reduced by half now, and he can't keep up with all the divorces that have happened to his class mates. it sounds like i will get to pay for 5 semesters of hazing and torture. failing a semester, means you must restart the ENTIRE program, not just the semester.

    is VERY common were on instructor will lecture, then another instructor administered the exam on that material and fails the entire class, because she does't think was the first instructor said was right. an entire class missed a question on the exam, they cited their textbook, and were told that the book was wrong ( also in the lecture notes the instructor actually presented what was in the book). she is 100% wrong and will not admit it, and refuses to correct HER mistake.

    i've been told to basically, keep my head down, don't ask questions, don't challenge the instructors and don't show any weakness, because it's like blood in the water, and they will go in for the kill.

    i'm a single mom of 3 and not taking care of my kids is not an option, now i'm beginning to wonder if i will be able to hack it. i'm wondering if i should go for the lpn, and endure only 3 semesters of insanity? I really had my heart set on an RN but wonder if i need to make adjustments to maximize my ability to complete the program and get a nursing license.

    Is this common? is nursing school really the 3rd circle of hell for everyone? can I really do this? any comments and advice would be greatly appreciated.
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    I'm not a nurse yet, just a nursing student so I don't usually reply on this part of allnurses but I thought maybe I could help since you are also a nursing student. Everyone has horror stories to tell, it's similar to when you're pregnant the first time and everyone tells you their horror story of labor and delivery. Yes, I think its very hard but if your determined to do you will probably get through it and if you've been accepted to an RN program I wouldn't give up my spot for anything. Just like I said about giving birth, its painful and everything else but its worth it and we all tend to put ourselves through it again. Now I know that its a little far-fetched comparison but I am just referring to the fear and stories part. Good Luck!! Let me know how it goes if you decide to go for it!
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    First of all, instructors don't fail students.............students fail themselves. Nursing school is no cake walk. Its hard, vigorous and challenging, I too was the mother of three when I went back to school. Fortunately, I didn't work through my core courses so nursing was my job. Every single free moment was spent studying. I would record my notes to listen to in the car to maximize every minute. The instructors are tough but not sadists. Anything in the text is fair game for exams even if it is not discussed in classes as well as points made in lecture that may not be in the text.
    I graduate top in my class, received the Nursing Department's Excellence Award and challenged the instructors in a mature professional manner. Be prepared to work harder than you ever worked before but believe me it is well worth the time and effort you put into it.
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    I'm a second year RN student. But I really enjoy all of my instructors!! Yes, they expect a lot from us, and yes we have lost a few along the way. But 75% or more, are still with us. I hate to hear those kinds of stories though, nursing school is hard enough without the instructors riding on a power trip. I actually started in a different program, with those type of instructors. But a move forced me to reapply at another school, with wonderful instructors and a higher NCLEX pass rate!!
    The best advice I was given, aside from "keep up with the readings", was to take as many practice tests as you can. They are everywhere. You can buy books, study guides, get them from the library, find them online... Everywhere. Practice, practice, practice!
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    Quote from bernikitty

    great right? but now i'm hearing really horrible stories about the instructors. basically the instructors are said to be sadistic, arrogant jerks, who will do everything to make you fail. none of the students feel that the instructors care or want them to succeed.
    I have heard this and more about every nursing program in my area. I can only imagine its the same everywhere. Some students do poorly and blame the teachers. Some teachers are honestly unreasonable and power trip. Some people are just so stressed out and perceive rather benign situations diffrerently.

    Is it hard? Yes. Worth it? Up to you.

    Any issues you have with your teachers, follow the schools grievance policy. Same with test issues. What are the policies that they have for the class? Can you challenge a question, do you go to the teacher etc? Know your resources and where to go to get the help you need to succeed.

    Good luck to you.
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    I can sympathize with the decision you are making. I agree with what most of the other posters have said and I just wanted to add an angle that is often left out.

    I went to a (very) rigorous BSN/RN program. We were all scared to death in those first days. And we responded by enouraging one another and determining that WE were going to get through the year TOGETHER. A bunch of strangers, standing in a room, with nothing in common but a goal.

    We had some good teachers, some great teachers and some absolutely horrible teachers. Same goes for clinical instruction. When there were problems, we approached the teachers...or if that failed...the administration TOGETHER....

    We continued to really root for one another, share our notes, form study groups, e-mail each other and next thing you know...we were all done and standing on stage together during our pinning! An amazing feeling. WE LOST NO-ONE. Not one single person left the program.

    And the single most important thing in determining the direction that our class took was how we all bonded with EACH OTHER.

    Now that we are graduated, the same feeling continues..... We formed study groups and attacked the NCLEX tohgether. And now....anytime a new grad job pops up in our area, an e-mail goes out alerting the entire cohort so that we can all apply. we compile interview questions and send them out etc. Yup...we are competing with each other...but at the same time, we cheer each time one of us gets employed....because we know that these people, who are now located in many of the best hospitals in our area can advocate for the rest of us, internally. And that is exactly what's happening. As a result...our cohort has an outstanding new hire percentage in one of the worst downturns in modern nursing history. And instead of fellow students...in the future...I will have COLLEAGUES all over this area...in many different departments and specialties that wouldn't hesitate to lend a hand as we progress in our careers.

    And...the CHOICE to bond and look past any differences that (inevitably) might have divided us...turned what might have been a supremely difficult year into a great adventure that we can look back on fondly.

    Think about what you can BRING to this program you speak of....not just what you can GET out of it...and the whole experience can change!!

    I wish you the best of luck. I am a new nurse (employed!) and loving every minute of it.
    Suethestudent likes this.
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    Go talk to the school. Ask to talk to the nursing faculty. Get a read on their attitude.

    My school's attitude was "almost nobody who applies gets in. If you manage to get in, then it is because we think you are good enough and we are going to help you get the rest of the way there."

    Don't be tripped up by the drama queens who scream about the sky falling and such.
  10. 0
    Quote from walden-puddle, rn
    i can sympathize with the decision you are making. i agree with what most of the other posters have said and i just wanted to add an angle that is often left out.

    i went to a (very) rigorous bsn/rn program. we were all scared to death in those first days. and we responded by enouraging one another and determining that we were going to get through the year together. a bunch of strangers, standing in a room, with nothing in common but a goal.

    we had some good teachers, some great teachers and some absolutely horrible teachers. same goes for clinical instruction. when there were problems, we approached the teachers...or if that failed...the administration together....

    we continued to really root for one another, share our notes, form study groups, e-mail each other and next thing you know...we were all done and standing on stage together during our pinning! an amazing feeling. we lost no-one. not one single person left the program.

    and the single most important thing in determining the direction that our class took was how we all bonded with each other.

    now that we are graduated, the same feeling continues..... we formed study groups and attacked the nclex tohgether. and now....anytime a new grad job pops up in our area, an e-mail goes out alerting the entire cohort so that we can all apply. we compile interview questions and send them out etc. yup...we are competing with each other...but at the same time, we cheer each time one of us gets employed....because we know that these people, who are now located in many of the best hospitals in our area can advocate for the rest of us, internally. and that is exactly what's happening. as a result...our cohort has an outstanding new hire percentage in one of the worst downturns in modern nursing history. and instead of fellow students...in the future...i will have colleagues all over this area...in many different departments and specialties that wouldn't hesitate to lend a hand as we progress in our careers.

    and...the choice to bond and look past any differences that (inevitably) might have divided us...turned what might have been a supremely difficult year into a great adventure that we can look back on fondly.

    think about what you can bring to this program you speak of....not just what you can get out of it...and the whole experience can change!!

    i wish you the best of luck. i am a new nurse (employed!) and loving every minute of it.
    what a beautiful and informative post! great advice for anyone entering nursing school.

    unfortunately, this was not really the case in my school, but i can honestly say that for the most part, the instructors were fair. yes, some were horrible, and those were the ones that taught the upper levels and had to have masters degrees. go figure.

    it's true that you really have to study and listen in lectures. use the study tools that come with the textbooks, be it an online site or a cd. i had to challenge a question on an exam in a course that had the reputation of being the hardest course in the program,with a very difficult, but very fair instructor. when i showed her that my answer was in the online study guide, i got credit for the answer. you just have to be respectful to the instructors, and hopefully they will respect you in return.
  11. 1
    Quote from kayern
    Anything in the text is fair game for exams even if it is not discussed in classes as well as points made in lecture that may not be in the text.
    This has been a key point for my class. I am halfway through and things are really starting to come together. A lot of our tests have stepped it up and are including things from previous semesters as well as material assigned for reading but not covered in lecture. READ your chapters, even if they do seem pointless and READ your articles if your instructors use them.

    Everyone gets horror stories from previous classes. It's hard work, and nothing motivates you more than failure at your heels. Use it to your advantage! Prepare for the worst and you might be pleasantly surprised.
    mamamerlee likes this.
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    Agree with what others are saying, there are some people who will tell their horror stories of NS.
    Nursing school IS a lot of work, the testing is unlike any other type of testing, the work load is huge
    My school went with the attitude of "You are adult learners responsible for your own education"
    There was one instructor who scared me to death my 1st year and then she ended up being my clinical instructors my last term of my 1st year. Was she hard - Yes, Did she push me - Yes, Did she raise my expectations of myself - Yes


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