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Lucky0220

Lucky0220

Med/Surg, Acute Rehab
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Lucky0220 has 4 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, Acute Rehab.

Former elementary school teacher 2nd career RN

Lucky0220's Latest Activity

  1. Lucky0220

    It's OFFICIAL!!! Tips and Encouragement from a Second Timer!

    Congrats!! What a fantastic and inspiring post. I took the NCLEX back in 2009 and I was so lucky not to have gotten many SATA questions! I hope that you get another promising position...you deserve it. Best of Luck You!
  2. Lucky0220

    overheard at the bedside

    That is a GREAT one for the "Say it Correctly" thread, that's somewhere on this site. Maybe the nurse was thinking about C-Diff! LOL
  3. Lucky0220

    overheard at the bedside

    Oops, put my response with the wrong post!
  4. Lucky0220

    St. David's GN Residency

    I stated above that I did not go in as a new nurse. I had 3 years of experience.
  5. Lucky0220

    St. David's GN Residency

    Maybe this should give you a good indication of St. David's organizational culture,and what it might be like to work for! I didn't go in as a new nurse and they didn't even have someone to just orient me to the unit. The hiring process takes forever, especially at their occupational health facility where I went to get my vaccinations. They used a QuantiFERON test in place of the PPD and this test needs a blood draw. At first I didn't mind because they had to draw blood for my titers anyway. From there, it got much worse. PM me if you want to hear my story.
  6. Just lovely.....this is what we went into nursing for! I love that phrase.."defensive nursing". Might have to borrow it for our next staff meeting!
  7. I couldn't agree more with this observation. I truly believe that the OP and other new grads, including myself, when I graduated 4 years ago, were totally unprepared for bedside nursing when we graduated. Unfortunately, I didn't know that I was so unprepared. Like the OP, I did very well in school, but believe me, that meant nothing when I got to the floor. Our clinicals during school, were, for the most part, a waste of time. Instructors were more concerned with the required care plans we turned in, rather than finding opportunities for us to provide patient care. I never had more than one patient during any of my clinicals, so you can imagine how horrible my time management skills were. nurseGi, you've gotten some great advice from the PPs and I hope that this new preceptor makes a difference for you. I went through 3 preceptors at my first job because I felt that they did not have great teaching skills. That is usually the problem. You can be a fantastic nurse, but not necessarily a great teacher. You first preceptor, and management too, seem to be out of touch with what nursing programs focus on these days, otherwise your preceptor would not have said what she did about you going to a good school and why don't you know such and such. I believe they had unrealistic expectations from you because of this. It seems to me that they see real potential in you, and that's why they're extending your orientation. But I'd still be wary, and aggressively look for another job during this time. If it doesn't work out, I'll paraphrase what a pp said "they didn't deserve you!!" Good luck:)
  8. Lucky0220

    ADN or accelerated BSN program?

    With an ADN and/or an ASN, you graduate with a DEGREE, not a diploma. ADN stands for Associate Degree in Nursing. ASN stands for Associate of Science in Nursing. Both are the same education-wise. It just depends on on where you live and the school. Being technical; the piece of paper that you get when you graduate (with any major), is called a diploma. But in nursing, there used to be many "diploma" programs. It was a different course of study, from what they have now and I don't think there are many of them around anymore. The one thing I know from those nurses who graduated from these programs, is that they came out of school much more prepared for working at the bedside. They were hospital sponsored programs and students had a lot more clinical time than those going for ADN's or even BSN's. I wish I had gotten more clinical time during school. I know that I would have been much more prepared for real nursing. Regardless, many hospitals are requiring new hires to have an BSN or at least be enrolled in a BSN program. So I would tell you to go for the BSN to make yourself more marketable.
  9. Lucky0220

    Things you'd LOVE to tell coworkers...and get away with it!

    You know, I just read somewhere that if you roll your eyes as much as you do, they just might stay like that; with the pupil and iris facing the retina. Then you'd have to walk backwards for the rest of your life!
  10. Lucky0220

    Things you'd LOVE to tell coworkers...and get away with it!

    For ktwlpn: Maybe you have not worked at many different hospitals, but in at least 2 hospitals I worked at, new hires had some sort of identifier, showing others that they were new. While I did not have a sticker, I believe I had a thin green strip across the badge. Their rational was not to demean us, but to inform others, in the hope that they would offer help. Not just nursing help, but in case we looked like we were lost in the halls, (that was me!!) while navigating around the hospital; or maybe just a cue to introduce themselves, when we were in other areas of the hospital. I found it to be helpful most of the time. You stated: A "green " nurse has to find her way,you must learn how to communicate effectively with peers and the medical staff and your education should have given you the tools to build on.Very few physicians will pass on the opportunity tro educate a nurse (in my experience) if you seem truly interested in learning but if you are asking policy and procedure these are things you should be familiar with so you may get a rude response. In reference to the above statement, why are you assuming that this poster was asking the physician or any other ED staff a question about policy and procedure. What makes you assume that she does not know how to communicate effectively? Maybe it was to clarify an order, or about patient care. She is in the process of "finding her way."
  11. Lucky0220

    What is the nurse-patient ratio where you work?

    I just cannot understand why more hospitals don't invest in an admissions RN for each shift. To me that would be such a help for the floor nurses. We have one where I work, but only from 11a to 11p and only 3 days a week. It is just one position for now. If each unit had one, it would take such a burden off everyone and I really think it would be cost effective. But I am not in management, so what do I know???
  12. Do not encourage 'mindlor' by responding to his posts which are always argumentative. Read some of them...and you will see what I mean. He likes to push everyone's buttons.
  13. fyi it seems that the op has not answered our questions as to whether he/she is hourly or salaried. in any case, since this is an important topic, i thought i would paste this info from the wage and hour division of the dept. of labor: wage and hour division (whd) fact sheet #17n: nurses and the part 541 exemptions under the fair labor standards act (flsa) nurses to qualify for the learned professional employee exemption, all of the following tests must be met: the employee must be compensated on a salary or fee basis (as defined in the regulations) at a rate not less than $455 per week; the employee's primary duty must be the performance of work requiring advanced knowledge, defined as work which is predominantly intellectual in character and which includes work requiring the consistent exercise of discretion and judgment; the advanced knowledge must be in a field of science or learning; and the advanced knowledge must be customarily acquired by a prolonged course of specialized intellectual instruction. registered nurses who are paid on an hourly basis should receive overtime pay. however, registered nurses who are registered by the appropriate state examining board generally meet the duties requirements for the learned professional exemption, and if paid on a salary basis of at least $455 per week, may be classified as exempt. licensed practical nurses and other similar health care employees, however, generally do not qualify as exempt learned professionals, regardless of work experience and training, because possession of a specialized advanced academic degree is not a standard prerequisite for entry into such occupations, and are entitled to overtime pay. hope this helps:) 
  14. Based on another one of your posts, where the thread was asking what hospital and what salary, you gave an annual figure. That suggests to me that you are not an hourly employee. Is this correct? If so, then unfortunately, they do not have to pay you for any extra hours over your scheduled shift. Sounds like a racket to me and sad for the nurses. Let us know and I hope things improve for you.:heartbeat
  15. It's sad, but true, I guess. Just like many candidates do not prepare for their interviews, some who are responsible for either doing the interview or setting it up, also do not prepare. I would be be proactive and say something to the person who is calling you like 'Can you tell me a bit more about the position?' Maybe this can open a dialogue where you can actually find out if they know what your qualifications are. Hope this helps.
  16. It's sad, but true, I guess. Just like many candidates do not prepare for their interviews, some who are responsible for either doing the interview or setting it up, alsp do not prepare. I would be be proactive and say something to the person who is calling you like 'Can you tell me a bit more about the position?' Maybe this can open a dialogue where you can actually find out if they know what your qualifications are. Hope this helps.