Employee Complaint - page 3

So I've been an RN for close to 2 years now and while the hospital I'm working at has a lot of faults, I genuinely like my coworkers and enjoy working with them. I get along with everyone and I... Read More

  1. by   wondern
    It's so strange/unsupportive of your manager, it may even be tomorrow, the next day, next week or the week after that, or a month... very crazy-making, unsettling, and disheartening to say the least. Start finding a place you might like better with a more supportive professional manager not a bully dictator. I know of one, a manager, who actually sought out complaints from others including from other departments. Kind of comical when she got told no actually. There are some good people left. There will always be biters though.
    She'll go low and find someone eventually. You go high and say bye-bye. Doesn't that sound like a bumper sticker? Maybe not.
    Last edit by wondern on May 12
  2. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from wondern
    It's so strange/unsupportive of your manager, it may even be tomorrow, the next day, next week or the week after that, or a month... very crazy-making, unsettling, and disheartening to say the least. Start finding a place you might like better with a more supportive professional manager not a bully dictator. I know of one, a manager, who actually sought out complaints from others including from other departments. Kind of comical when she got told no actually. There are some good people left. There will always be biters though.
    She'll go low and find someone eventually. You go high and say bye-bye. Doesn't that sound like a bumper sticker? Maybe not.
    I had a nurse manager who used to troll for complaints against nurses. I went into a patient's room once soon after I saw the manager coming out. The patient was very upset because it was apparent to her that the manager was soliciting complaints to use against nurses. Unfortunately the patient insisted that I not take the situation further.

    I found the patient credible because it was the third instance I'd heard of the manager doing this. One nurse encountered a former patient in her church who told her the manager had been trying very hard to solicit complaints. I did inform the union but not much they can do without cooperation from more nurses.

    After I left that unit I finally quit going to their baby showers and retirement parties because I kept running into that manager.
  3. by   babyNP.
    Sorry OP that this happened to you. I agree with OldDude's advice though.

    This kind of dumb stuff happened when I worked as a bedside nurse to me and pretty much everyone on the unit. IMO, it's a cancer and creates a toxic work environment. I am so thankful that the amount of drama I deal with as a NP is light years below what I saw that happened to others as a nurse.
  4. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Quote from babyNP.
    Sorry OP that this happened to you. I agree with OldDude's advice though.

    This kind of dumb stuff happened when I worked as a bedside nurse to me and pretty much everyone on the unit. IMO, it's a cancer and creates a toxic work environment. I am so thankful that the amount of drama I deal with as a NP is light years below what I saw that happened to others as a nurse.
    And I am thankful to be retired and away from this kind of nonsense! GADS!
  5. by   keekle1971
    At the ER where I work, lab techs aren't allowed to draw from a regular peripheral IV, let alone a PICC or port. It will be your hospital's rules and regs that will determine if that complaint is a write-up or if it stays in your record.
  6. by   Been there,done that
    I had an ultrasound tech complain to my manager. I was " abrupt" with her while she was doing the scan. It was " get outta my way, that patient can't breathe ". Manager listened to MY side of the story and the complaint went to File 13. That should be all it takes , YOU are the professional in this situation. Only your manager knows if this is considered a write up. If it is... start the plan to get outta Dodge.

    You will receive many uncalled for complaints...you must let them roll off your back.
  7. by   Oldmahubbard
    The main thing that drove me to become an NP was this type of nonsense. It is least 98% better, mostly because when you have NP after your name, there is some respect.
    I agree it is unlikely this will be your last complaint. Not because you are doing anything wrong.
  8. by   Kareegansee
    This is totally something that I would have said too, if I didn't already know that PICC line use was reserved for RNs. Sometimes people's sincere desire to inquire becomes misinterpreted, either because questions may make the other feel threatened, annoyed, or that you are "pushing back." In the professional world, it should be reasonable to ask questions without having someone assume that your intentions are bad, especially given the fact that she knows you to be pleasant and cooperative. In my opinion, this situation highlights a failure by her (and many) to understand one another in the setting of two different viewpoints.
  9. by   SobreRN
    Never heard of any hospital which allows NAs to draw from PICCS & seems trivial for a write-up but now you know she is a back stabber. Going forward I would be cordial but cautious as I would be with anyone who ran off to management over relatively benign encounter.
    I'd just be professional but not engage in any chit-chat with her.
    As the song goes "Smiling faces sometimes they don't tell the truth."
  10. by   jennylee321
    Quote from JKL33
    I wouldn't have any conversations with her about this unless your manager feels you should and wants to be present.

    Forget that. Next thing you'll know you'll be accused of bullying her and seeking her out and making her uncomfortable because she complained.

    Nope, no way. Similar to "fool me once...."
    Unless it goes the other way and you get in trouble for not apologising

    Either way sounds like we are definitely in special snowflake territory here.

    Are you a newer nurse but she's a very experienced phlebotomist ? If so she might of felt 'threatened'by your question, even though there was nothing inherently wrong with it .
  11. by   cleback
    I would be leary approaching her alone, particularly if she's the smile to your face and complain behind your back type. I would approach your manager first... if she feels it would be appropriate, schedule a quick meeting the three of you. Or send an email with your manager cc'd. Or do nothing and don't exchange more than pleasantries in the future.

    Honestly, though, in the future, don't get so inquisitive about why it's policy that someone can't do xyz. Especially someone ranking lower than you. That's something for the manager. We've probably all had it done to us by a physician or another. That sort of questioning can easily be misconstrued as push back and is simply annoying. I wouldn't have lodged a formal complaint but yeah... don't be that person.
  12. by   LoveMyRNlife
    OP, I am much like you, never bring my problems to work, team player, always smiling, etc. As a newer RN, and second career, I asked the very same question out of genuine curiosity. I personally do not get so offended by simple questions if the intent is to learn. I also do not get offended, to the point I run and tattle, when someone is grumpy one day. If that is not their norm then I assume they are just having a bad shift like we all have from time to time.
    I have also been blindsided by the sugary sweet smiling coworker that never said anything to my face but went to the manager behind my back with a ridiculous complaint. Lesson learned for me. You will never be able to please everyone so just be the best you can be. If the climate on your unit is to write everyone up for petty things then you might want to look for a new Work home.
    I'm sorry this happened to you.

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