Dropping Magnet - page 5

by PMFB-RN

14,747 Views | 75 Comments

I found this interesting. One of this regions largest health system's flagship hospital has dropped it's Magnet certification. They have been certified since 2004 and was the first hospital in the state, outside the state... Read More


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    gypsyd8 - I am sorry that you feel offended by my comment towards MSN nurses in our area but it is true for us. I have had my MSN for three years now, but only for teaching. I can say to you that I hope that you make positive changes in an administrative position. My simple point and it seems that many agree with me, is that administration tends to disconnect from patient care in many areas of the country. If you can figure that out you will be a good leader. I have actually recommended to our board that clinical coordinators and directors have mandatory patient care hours in a months time. In that time they can actually see if decisions they are making actually work on the floor. To me this is common sense, not challenging administration.
  2. 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN

    *** That is by no means a universal thing. It is true that the same kind of thinking among managment that likes things like Magnet will also be the same type of person who prefers to hire only BSNs. Lots of Magnet hospitals hire ADNs and a few even prefer them.

    *** YES! Magnet is a very expensive program.

    *** The laying off of nurses is a symptom of a tight butget, as was the decision to drop Magnet.

    *** They don't need to keep the status. There is no reason for a hospital to be Magnet unless nursing administration wants to be. Lots of Magnet hospitals were not very good to begin with but managed to slap a fresh coat of paint on thier problems enough to satisfy the Magnet survayors. For example I remeber being shocked to walk into my unit during survay to find our unit, usually staffed 1/2 to 2/3 travelers, fully (overly) staffed with regular employees, many on over time. We were also handed 3x5 cards with likely survayors questions on them and the managment approved answer we were to give, along with threats of what would happen to any nurses who answered honestly rather than giving the "approved" answer.

    I
    My hospital hires 70% of its new grads employee as ADN nurses, every year, including this year. I will start with other new grads in July. Us ADN new grads must sign a contract saying we will get a BSN within 3 years if our hire date, and we get tuition reimbursement earlier to help us. This is the "loophole" many hospitals around here are taking that allows them to continue hiring loads of ADN nurses.
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  3. 6
    Magnet is a bad joke -- our hospital is dropping it as well. There are all kinds of "reasons" why they're not continuing the Magnet program, but the main one is that this is a doctor's hospital. They don't really WANT nurses to have a voice.
  4. 0
    Quote from Flyboy17
    ... administration tends to disconnect from patient care in many areas of the country...
    Have to agree with this sentiment.
  5. 2
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Magnet ...our hospital is dropping it as well... this is a doctor's hospital. They don't really WANT nurses to have a voice.
    OK.

    Nice that they're up front about their convictions.
    OCNRN63 and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
  6. 4
    My understanding is that magnet status programs were initiated in the early 2000's during a nursing shortage cycle. At that time, human resourses and nurse managers, viewed the research that magnet hospitals retained their nurses twice as long as non-magnet hospitals as a solution to their nurse retention problems. Now that there are global economic problems and there is no longer a nursing shortage, most hospitals do not need nurse retention programs. Instead hospitals are implementing efficiency and cost cutting programs, in another decade, we will be back to a nursing shortage and can start the nurse recruitment/retention games all over again.
    Last edit by dishes on Jun 27, '13
  7. 3
    Quote from dishes
    My understanding is that magnet status programs were initiated in the early 2000's during a nursing shortage cycle. At that time, human resourses and nurse managers, viewed the research that magnet hospitals retained their nurses twice as long as non-magnet hospitals as a solution to their nurse retention problems. Now that there are global economic problems and there is no longer a nursing shortage, most hospitals do not need nurse retention programs. Instead hospitals are implementing efficiency and cost cutting programs, in another decade, we will be back to a nursing shortage and can start the nurse recruitment/retention games all over again.
    This is exactly what my friends and I were saying at lunch today. However, we are now starting to see RN's leaving our hospital for "greener pastures" and we are beginning to hire travelers, ask staff to work overtime, recruit, etc. again. We are hoping it will once again lead to better working conditions as retention becomes more of need again.
    PMFB-RN, dishes, and hiddencatRN like this.
  8. 0
    Quote from llg
    ... We are hoping it will once again lead to better working conditions as retention becomes more of need again.
    Some forecasters project this will happen at some point.... with attribution going to the large number of boomers to yet retire, the growing over-65 crowd, and the increase in life-expectency.
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    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Magnet is a bad joke -- our hospital is dropping it as well. There are all kinds of "reasons" why they're not continuing the Magnet program, but the main one is that this is a doctor's hospital. They don't really WANT nurses to have a voice.

    *** Magnet doesn't give nurses a voice. If anything it squelches our voices. Unions give nurses a voice. I went out of my way to find a non Magnet, non religious, publicly owned, union hospital. I have never been treated better or paid better.
  10. 6
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Magnet doesn't give nurses a voice. If anything it squelches our voices. Unions give nurses a voice. I went out of my way to find a non Magnet, non religious, publicly owned, union hospital. I have never been treated better or paid better.
    I agree about unions -- sadly, though, too many nurses view unions as the enemy. I left a wonderful job in a union hospital to move 3000 miles . . . and there are no union hospitals here.


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