Dr Phil and tipping

  1. Did anyone see the Dr Phil show on etiquette where they recommend tipping at least 20%? They had a sample table there and the waitress would have made $80 just from the tip at 20%. Even if you assume that it took 2h to complete the meal and that was her only table she was making twice as much as I do per hour. And no bedpans or life and death decisions.

    I could go for a career change right about now. I have a firm rule that I don't tip so the server is making more than I do per hour. How much do you all tip when you go out?

    And when will nurses be allowed to start accepting tips??
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  2. 68 Comments

  3. by   NS_RN
    I'm with you on that..I suppose if you can afford to go to a restaurant where 20% of the bill comes to $80, then you can afford to tip that.
    I tip15% in general, and I give my hairdresser $5 regardless of what I have done.
    Last edit by NS_RN on Jul 29, '03
  4. by   Cynthiann
    I did see a part of that show, I never seen Dr. Phil saying that he recommended at least 20%. If I can remember right, he said to tip 20% if you've had exceptional service. Where as 15% is more the normal amount.

    Sometimes I feel that what a waitress does is just as misunderstood as nurses. I feel strongly about this because I used to be a waitress. Did you know that most waitresses get paid $2.13/hour from the employer? And with that $2.13/hour we have to come in early to set up and stay late to clean. So a waitress could easily be there without taking tables 2 extra hours just for $2.13/hr. Then there are the days when it's just so slow I wouldn't even break minimum wage. Then you have to factor in the people who either don't tip at all or the ones who tip $1-2 no matter how large their tab. And what's really annoying to a server is when you have only 3 tables and during the lunch rush or weekend nights, there is one table that sits there for hours so you can't make anymore money because of it. Then they only leave you a couple of dollars.

    I could go on and on about it. The majority of restaurants that is the norm. It may be different at one of those expensive restaurants where a check with two people can cost at least a couple hundred dollars.

    It's like how people think all that nurses do is take an order from a doctor. You can apply the same analogy to servers. They do a lot more then you see. To tell you the truth I'd much rather be a nurse because I don't have to constantly kiss a$$ with every customer/patient I come in contact with to make every dollar.

    OK, I'm off my soapbox now.
  5. by   live4today
    ...........against waiters/waitresses only being paid $2.13 per hour! That's SHOCKING to me! How do employers of restaurants get away with that? Would they like to work for such a measly hourly wage? I THINK NOT!!!

    Once again..........any occupation that has mostly women or a task that is viewed as one for mostly women seriously underpays its employees! When or when will the abuse of women end my friends?

    I always tip servers 15% of the tab, sometimes more for the more exceptional servers.

    I tipped the hair stylist $10.00 for the exceptional job she did on my seven year old granddaughter's hair last weekend.

    When I have my groceries taken to the car by the baggers, I always give them $5.00 if I have it to spare, but seldom less than $3.00. Depends on the load of groceries they have to bag and put in my car.

    If I charged a tip from my patients over and above what I make, they wouldn't want me for a nurse because they couldn't afford me. :chuckle
  6. by   colleen10
    I think everyone should at least once in their life HAVE to work in a restaurant or back in the kitchen.

    I worked as a waitress/server and my husband once worked at a dishwasher. It really is physically hard work with very little pay. Kind of like nursing. It makes you appreciate going to school and getting an education and hopefully finding a decent job when you are done.

    Because I know how hard it is I always cut my waitstaff a break if it's really busy and they meals take a little while to get out to the table, etc. And I always try to leave them a decent tip between 15-20%. But I don't usually go out anywhere that is really expensive so I have never had to worry about an $80 tip.

    If, however, it isn't very busy or they are just plain rude or a bad server I will give them less. And if the service is really lousy I won't leave them anything and won't go back to that restaurant again.
  7. by   Cynthiann
    Originally posted by cheerfuldoer
    ...........against waiters/waitresses only being paid $2.13 per hour! That's SHOCKING to me! How do employers of restaurants get away with that? Would they like to work for such a measly hourly wage? I THINK NOT!!!
    It's been like that for years. While the national minimum wage has slowly gone up, server wages has stayed the same. I guess they feel it's justified since they make tips.

    I have heard that in states where cost of living is much more, like CA, most servers usually get paid about $6/hr.
  8. by   Cynthiann
    Originally posted by colleen10
    I think everyone should at least once in their life HAVE to work in a restaurant or back in the kitchen.

    I worked as a waitress/server and my husband once worked at a dishwasher. It really is physically hard work with very little pay. Kind of like nursing. It makes you appreciate going to school and getting an education and hopefully finding a decent job when you are done.

    Because I know how hard it is I always cut my waitstaff a break if it's really busy and they meals take a little while to get out to the table, etc. And I always try to leave them a decent tip between 15-20%. But I don't usually go out anywhere that is really expensive so I have never had to worry about an $80 tip.

    If, however, it isn't very busy or they are just plain rude or a bad server I will give them less. And if the service is really lousy I won't leave them anything and won't go back to that restaurant again.
    Colleen,

    Was it your experience, too, that usually some of the best tippers were those who are or were servers themselves?
  9. by   Katnip
    How servers and former servers tip can very. I tend to be pretty generous, but some are picky. They don't cut their server a break.

    My husband was always a stingy tipper. If the food wasn't cooked right he didn't want to tip at all. I explained over and over again that the server didn't cook it. Still he considered it part of the service.

    And sometimes service is slow because the kitchen is backed up. He's gotten a bit better, but it's still like pulling teeth to get him to give the minimum 15%.
  10. by   live4today
    Originally posted by Cynthiann
    It's been like that for years. While the national minimum wage has slowly gone up, server wages has stayed the same. I guess they feel it's justified since they make tips.

    I have heard that in states where cost of living is much more, like CA, most servers usually get paid about $6/hr.
    Sounds like we need to not only protest unfair practices to nurses but also servers across the USA. I'm certainly never going to cheat a server of their tips no matter what the service. They have families to feed too, bills to pay, and dignity to maintain. :kiss
  11. by   purplemania
    I hate the tipping process because it is not objective and short-=tipping the waitress for a badly prepared meal does not address the problem. In parts of Europe the staff are paid a salary and the gratuity is an invisibile part of your bill. Some even discourage tipping because it takes away from the teamwork aspect of service.
  12. by   MandyInMS
    I give the normal 15%..more if great service and the waiter/waitress is really nice/friendly..less if he/she is 'snotty'...it's all about the attitude wish we got paid by our attitude as nurses...lol...I'm with the others as far as an $80 tip...geeeeeez..wish I could afford that...I do tip well though cuz my son has been a waiter before and I KNOW they don't get paid much of anything and depend on tips to make it.
  13. by   live4today
    Originally posted by purplemania
    I hate the tipping process because it is not objective and short-=tipping the waitress for a badly prepared meal does not address the problem. In parts of Europe the staff are paid a salary and the gratuity is an invisibile part of your bill. Some even discourage tipping because it takes away from the teamwork aspect of service.
    One thing to keep in mind, purplemania...the waiters/waitresses simply serve the food...they do not cook the food. If the food tastes bad, lay the blame where the blame should be...on those in the kitchen preparing the meals we order to eat.

    How many times are we served a bad meal and still pay for it?

    How many of us complain and send it back?

    How many complain and eat it anyway?

    NOT ME! If I am served a badly prepared meal, I kindly tell the waiter/waitress to return it to the kitchen and let the chef know the meal tastes horrible, and to prepare it better, or I'll take my dining experience elsewhere. I tip her for the trouble because like nurses, the servers are caught in the middle of the customer and the chef. NOT a fun place to be, but we are there nonetheless because we each have to make a living based on what we know whether it's a temporary stop for some of us, or a permanent one.

    Don't blame the servers........call the chef to the table if the meal is bad!
  14. by   colleen10
    Cynthiann,

    I don't really know, I never asked or talked about it with the patrons.

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