Does anyone else plan to stay in bedside?

  1. 0
    I'm 24 and it seems that all my nursing friends my age and older only use bedside nursing as a stepping stone to CRNP,DNP, CRNA, and NM. I have no issue with that, it just seems like I'm the only one in the group that truly love bedside nursing and when I tell them that they are shocked. I also feel like they think it means I'm settling, but I didn't become a nurse not to work in bedside. I can totally see myself being one of those nurses still working the floor until I'm ready to roll over and die.

    I started nursing 8 years ago. I went from a CNA, LPN, RN and now on my way to BSN. So I do understand the politics and the stresses of working in bedside. However, the pros outweigh the cons in my opinions.

    My long term goal is to do part-time in bedside and part-time teaching clinicals for LPNs and RNs at a CC. In my area, you need a BSN to teach clinical.

    So am I the only one who truly loves being a bedside nurse?
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  3. 50 Comments so far...

  4. 7
    I'm 32 years old, have been a nurse for 7 years and plan to remain at the bedside. However, I don't love bedside nursing or anything like that. It is simply a means to an end, and to be honest, I do not know what the end is.

    Most non-bedside positions would require me to work five days per week, which is totally unappealing to me. I'd rather work a compressed schedule of three 12-hour shifts or two 16-hour shifts per week and enjoy my four or five days off every week.

    In addition, I have dabbled in the charge nurse and supervisory roles, and I honestly did not like being in charge. I dislike it when the buck stops with me. I am not management material. I feel more comfortable following the lead rather than being the leader.
    Ginger's Mom, bella_, anotherone, and 4 others like this.
  5. 0
    I have no plans right now to leave bedside. I really enjoy what I do and the facility I work for. At 37, I know I should be thinking of the future but right now, Im happy. I have been asked to do charge but I prefer to do rapid response instead and precept
  6. 0
    My semi retirement plan is to be a NP and a clinical instructor/educator ...that would be after I have at least 30 years bedside experience. I have 22 years to go-I was a LPN for 7 years, RN (BSN) for 1.

    The closest I want to got back to school is to get a post bachelors certificate in education. I'm not in a rush. By the time I want to enter the realm of NP, I hope the "rush" will be over, lol.

    I think you have planned a great path for yourself. At least I know there are people who plan to stay as long as I have !
  7. 0
    Quote from crazy&cuteRN
    I'm 24 .....

    I started nursing 8 years ago. I went from a CNA, LPN, RN and now on my way to BSN.
    Guessing you were a CNA at 16 ( I assume that's what you meant by "started nursing 8 years ago"--not really nursing but I get the idea )

    I didn't think you COULD be a CNA at only 16! Learn something new every day.
  8. 3
    If you had asked me when I was 24, I would have said my plan was to stay bedside. I do not want to be a Nurse Practitioner and still have a good 4-5 years before my undergrad degree will be paid off so I don't really see taking on any more debt to go back to school. Now, at 29, I can't imagine working bedside again with the 12 hr shifts, nights, weekends. I never thought I wanted a Mon-Fri but now that I have it, I don't want to ever go back. Most of my friends are not nurses and it's very nice to have the same schedule as them.
  9. 0
    I'm not a newly-produced RN, but I do know what you mean by new grads getting into nursing as a stepping stone to something else. I spend part of my day doing bedside work and part doing administrative (that's the kind of facility I work in now, and I enjoy it)....but honestly I wouldn't have stayed at the bedside for my entire career anyway. I expected to move to a management position (and have done so) but I do wonder about the future of bedside. After all, how many advanced practice nurses does one need in a hospital, versus "plain ol' RNs"?
  10. 1
    Quote from RNsRWe
    I didn't think you COULD be a CNA at only 16! Learn something new every day.
    In the state where I reside (Texas), a person is eligible to train to become a CNA if (s)he is at least 15 years old with a ninth grade education.
    Nccity2002 likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    In the state where I reside (Texas), a person is eligible to train to become a CNA if (s)he is at least 15 years old with a ninth grade education.
    After reading this, I did some Googling and found that while according to the NYS Labor Department there is NO minimum age for becoming certified as a CNA, in practice it's quite different. I couldn't find one school (in NYS) that would allow someone to enroll under the age of 17. I found some were 18. Requirements for having a high school diploma was common, but if you were enrolling in the BOCES classes at 17, you don't need the diploma (although the school had requirements for testing, etc).

    Interesting.

    Don't mean to throw discussion off course, sorry! Just caught my interest
  12. 0
    if I wind up in LDRP I will gladly stay at the bedside - otherwise I'll likely at some point head back to school for my masters in education


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