Doctor texting order turned into a nightmare - page 3

by Scotthudson1966

11,255 Views | 49 Comments

I work in a sub acute care facility and we don't always have a doctor in house. Most of the doctors and nurse practitioners are texting orders to the nurses. We are also texting questions and lab information to the mds and nps. ... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from FlorenceNtheMachine
    And this is what happens when you give an inch. Because its quicker, convenient, blah blah blah! Our bad habit is doing a telephone/verbal order when the doctor is sitting right there. But because no one will speak up, and ask the doctor to use their own hand to write the order. So the nurses get raked over the coals because we shouldn't be writing out verbals unless its an emergency.
    I just bring the chart to them and say here you go!! Several docs roll their eyes because other nurses take verbal orders but I don't care it's safest.
  2. 1
    what does your p&p say about receiving orders?
    if it does allow texting, i would encourage DON to re-eval policy.

    leslie
    imintrouble likes this.
  3. 0
    I doubt it's even a legal way to go about things anyway...what if the pt croaked and the family sued, receiving txt messages for orders wouldn't hold up in court!
  4. 3
    I havent read all of the posts, my apologies if this has been addressed...

    How are you protecting the privacy of patients through cell phone text messages???

    Texts are NOT secure. IF you are receiving orders you MUST be identifying the patient in the text. You might want to discover the legalities of what you are doing.
  5. 2
    I saw a newer nurse where I work text an MD for orders. The first time I've ever seen any nurse do that. Didn't even know it was being done til right now. My thought was it's just unprofessional. I have been enlightened. I'll add HIPAA violation to why I don't like it.

    I'm such a dinosaur
    leslie :-D and GrnTea like this.
  6. 0
    I worked at a place that used yahoo email to communicate with docs. Orders were communicated as well. The nurses would print the emails and put them in charts. I was appalled . Email accounts get hacked into all the time. I couldn't trust that the sender was the md, anyone could go in and respond. Needless to say I didn't last three days. No way was I going to work for a place like that, keeping narcs unlocked at the nurses station was a red flag too.... But I digress.....
  7. 0
    HIPPA!!!
  8. 0
    HIPAA too!

    That doc had better forget it ever happened, unless they want to be dragged into violation land with you. We were either taught, or had a policy (at the time I was a student and didn't care which one it was, just follow it and shut up!) that even talking about the patients on cell phones was unacceptable. I know everyone does it all day but I don't think it's secure.
  9. 0
    Our hospital had text orders. All hospitalists had a hospital assigned blackberry and each unit had a hospital assigned cellphone (although most nurses used their personal cells to send texts or emails to the hospitalists blackberry). It used to be that you could send text message orders, but now they stopped it for reasons similar to the OPs situation, I think. The hospitalist still have their blackberry's and the units their cell phones. Now you can only receive email orders, telephone order, written orders, and in necessary cases, verbal orders.

    Personally I don't see much of a difference in allowing email orders, but not text ones. Same principle. But, IDK. I guess because the email is always sent from your hospital associated email to the hospitalists hospital associated email linked to their blackberry's.
  10. 1
    Quote from tewdles
    I havent read all of the posts, my apologies if this has been addressed...

    How are you protecting the privacy of patients through cell phone text messages???

    Texts are NOT secure. IF you are receiving orders you MUST be identifying the patient in the text. You might want to discover the legalities of what you are doing.
    In my case, I'd text Dr. McNotSoDreamyInTheEnd with "potassium came back - 3.2." or "chest x ray is up - please look at."

    He'd put the orders in. I wouldn't even say the patient's room number - it was someone we'd already been discussing in person or on the phone.

    Still wrong, though.
    leslie :-D likes this.


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