Do you cut corners in your daily nursing practice? - page 4

by madwife2002 Asst. Admin

21,590 Unique Views | 109 Comments

Do you cut corners in your daily nursing practice? Or do you do everything according to the ‘book’. Do you police yourself in your everyday care of a patient, what do I mean by police yourself? I mean always follow the correct... Read More


  1. 5
    Great article and I can appreciate this so much. I have taken a vow to do no intentional harm to my patients. If I didn't remain sterile for a Foley catheter procedure and that patient got an infection, I would never be able to forgive myself. So, yes, I do things by the book. I'm very disheartened when I see nurses cutting corners. The reason it's so upsetting to me is because some of the things they are doing are dangerous. I have observed many nurses giving cardiac medications without checking pulse or blood pressure. I actually won't go into more detail on some of the things I've seen. In the beginning, I was wondering why those nurses always got out on time and got to sit down during their shift to document. My manager says that I need to work on time management, but I'm doing things the right way. I can look in the mirror at the end of every shift and know that I have given my all to my patients. Not only was it quality care but it was coupled with compassion too.
    Last edit by FLmed on Dec 8, '12
    janhetherington, anotherone, tokmom, and 2 others like this.
  2. 2
    Quote from dudette10

    Funny you should say that because I do ask myself when I'm tempted to cut a corner. The answer though is, yes, I still cut corners.

    Just one example: At my workplace, we are required to chart two head-to-toes per shift. I do a full hands-on assessment at the beginning of shift, but the second one? Well, if I can't figure out if anything has changed in six hours when I've been in that room at a minimum of three times, my assessment skills and powers of observation suck.
    Wow -- you have to chart two head to toe assessments? Wow- I feel for you!
    Fink and redhead_NURSE98! like this.
  3. 1
    Quote from thelema13
    Of course I cut corners, only way to survive as an RN.

    I cannot give you all of your medication information when I discharge you. I give the main points, but there is something to be said for self-awareness. It is also the patient's responsibility to read directions.

    Sometimes I don't finish the fluid bolus on a DC'd patient so I can clear the room for another sick one.

    Using nursing judgment, critical thinking skills and autonomy are our greatest tools. In a perfect world we could do everything by the book, but in reality, we are all overworked and understaffed.
    I have been a RN for almost 5 months, and I can honestly say that I've never cut corners. What you have written here makes a lot of sense though. Perhaps I might need to look at my current practice and reevaluate things. I'm sooo incredibly burned out right now.
    Kooky Korky likes this.
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    I used to wonder why my co-workers at a certain job ALWAYS got smoke breaks, meal breaks, and left on time, while I was always getting off late and never breaking for more than 15 or 20 minutes, while charting.

    It's because I was charting, checking VS and I/O that were supposed to be put in the chart by aides, restocking the med and tx carts, and doing my dressings.

    The other nurses weren't bothering to chart! Or make sure the aides did their charting!

    Newbie FLmed, bless your heart.
    Last edit by Kooky Korky on Dec 8, '12
    Susie2310 likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    Right....so you're going to throw your gloves into the trash and then wash your hands outside the door and stand there while they dry so you can walk in the room and immediately wash them again?

    Or...you're going to throw your gloves away and then wash them outside the door/as you walk into the room? Or throw your gloves away and use the dispenser inside the room? Either way...it's the same thing.

    I've not seen a person yet who throws their gloves away, washes their hands while they stand outside the room and then walks into the room where they'll immediately be washed again.
    Color me a bit confused, but our sinks are in the room and I use paper towels. I usually gel in, and will put on gloves. Once done with gloves, I throw them away, turn on the faucet, wash hands, take the paper towel and dry my hands. I then take the towel to turn off the faucet. I toss the paper towel and walk out of the room. I then go into another room and repeat my process in front of the pt. That is our PnP and anything less gets a write up.
  6. 3
    Quote from tokmom
    Put yourself in the other pt's room that is three feet away. A nurse walks in the room and doesn't wash her hands. Are you going to A) Ask her to wash her hands because you, the patient, did not see it? B) Assume she did and say nothing? C) Say nothing because you don't want to offend her? Nobody is touching me without washing once they enter the room. I don't care if the washed their hands 3 feet away. If it's not done in front of me, nobody is touching myself or my kids.
    Whatever. If I just washed my hands in the hallway (where I do 90% of my hand washing) I am NOT gonna wash them again in front of just because you're an OCD case. Sorry, but you're SOL on this one.
  7. 0
    Quote from tokmom
    Color me a bit confused, but our sinks are in the room and I use paper towels. I usually gel in, and will put on gloves. Once done with gloves, I throw them away, turn on the faucet, wash hands, take the paper towel and dry my hands. I then
    take the towel to turn off the faucet. I toss the paper towel and walk out of the room. I then go into another room and repeat my process in front of the pt. That is our PnP and anything less gets a write up.
    Yikes.
  8. 1
    Quote from BrandonLPN
    Whatever. If I just washed my hands in the hallway (where I do 90% of my hand washing) I am NOT gonna wash them again in front of just because you're an OCD case. Sorry, but you're SOL on this one.
    Is it OCD or is it keeping yourself, as a patient, safe, from God knows what?

    Come to my hospital and you would be out the door in less than a month. It's taken seriously. Very seriously. There are secret shoppers watching nurses come and go. I prefer not to be written up and the pt's actually say they like seeing people wash their hands. We also boast a zero infection rate.
    gonzo1 likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from tokmom
    Is it OCD or is it keeping yourself, as a patient, safe, from God knows what?Come to my hospital and you would be out the door in less than a month. It's taken seriously. Very seriously. There are secret shoppers watching nurses come and go. I prefer not to be written up and the pt's actually say they like seeing people wash their hands. We also boast a zero infection rate.
    Well, maybe I'm confused. If I sanitize my hands with the dispenser right outside the room, that's not good enough? I have to wash again in front of you? And I have to glove on and glove off just to touch the faucet? Or am I misunderstanding?
  10. 3
    Well, if it's that's important for the pt to see me wash my hands, I guess they better park themselves in a spot where they can see me do it at the dispenser in the hall. Cause that's where I'm gonna do it.

    BTW, research shows that the hand
    sanitizer kills more germs than soap and water. (obviously, for c-diff, I wash at the sink because the friction is what kills the spores)


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