Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - pg.31 | allnurses

Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide. - page 31

Am I the only one who becomes at least mildly irritated whenever a random individual finds out that someone is a nurse and proceeds to say, "You're rolling in the big bucks!" To keep things... Read More

  1. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    0
    Quote from midnighter94
    I've been a Registered Nurse for 21 years in the Midwest. When I started I was making almost $15/hour plus shift differential for midnight shift. At the facility I'm at now I've been at the top of the pay scale for awhile, which is just over $37/hour. So over the course of my career I would say, yes, I am happy with the way my pay has risen. But, the starting pay is now about $27/hour. So that means there is only a range of about $10 between new grads and nurses with tons of experience and I think that's sad. We're not getting compensated for our experience and loyalty. In the past 7 years we've gotten 2 raises. We're getting one next month, but those of us at the top of the pay scale are not getting anything, not even a one-time check. And every year our costs go up - our insurance is more expensive, our co-pays, we now have deductibles that we never used to have; there's a spousal surcharge for insurance (eg: my husband has insurance available at his work but opts not to take it and I have him on my insurance, I am charged $46/per paycheck for him).
    We miss holidays, birthdays, family get-togethers, school functions and so many other things because we are working. Yes, we make good money, but we work hard! We come home physically and emotionally exhausted. And maybe many of us "only" work 3 days a week, but in those 3 days we put in just as many hours as most people put in in 5 days at their jobs. We don't get benefits when we retire since we're not union, so no insurance, and hopefully we've put enough into our retirement plans.
    I love my job, and I can't even imagine doing anything else. I'm always proud to say I'm a nurse.
    I am also in Michigan but work at a union hospital. I make $37.11/hr and my shift diff brings it to $40.17/hr. I have one or two steps left before I'm at the top of the payscale, but the difference is, as long as my union negotiates pay raises I will always get an increase in my hourly rate until I reach the top, and then I will get a lump sum bonus based on a percentage formula which I've forgotten. But even those at the top of the pay scale get an increase with each new contract, assuming that pattern holds with future contracts. We also get loyalty bonuses, I think starting in the 7th year with the corporation.

    One minor but important thing I disagree with is that when working 3 days /wk, we only work 36 hours compared to those working a traditional 40 hour work week. I do agree, however, that we work hard for what we get paid. I also think that we don't get paid enough based on how physically demanding the job is, how much responsibility is involved, and what we give up in terms of the weekends and holidays that we miss with our families, not to mention activities at school and sports when our children are young.

    One final thing--I don't think any hospitals provide any benefits upon retirement anymore unless you have been grandfathered in with a plan. The closest any come to that is to contribute a certain amount to a 403B which you then must become vested in, but I know of both union and non-union who do that.
  2. Visit  c.strong profile page
    1
    Big money. Well in 1980 Reg Nurses made $5.00 an hour. Minimum wage was $1.60 an hour The nurses in California united "a terrible Shame and went on strike Many months, I cannot remember. They held out and Their pay went to Base pay $25 an hour + years of nursing plus specialty areas. average of Patient ratio 5 to 1 Nurse. with assist of CNAs and orderlies (remember those guys) who helped lift and care for over wt Patients, and the severely handicapped 8 hour shifts. freedom to choose days to work. Acuityof Patients was not what is today
    Today nurse base pay is $25 an hour with no credit for years of nursing a little more for specialty areas $2-$3 dollars an hour. The Ratio is 10-12 to 1 nurse with 1 CNA no orderlies. 12 hour shifts. Acuity is much higher. Work shifts are mandatory swing at the required CHOICE OF ADMINISTRATION, and all the politics that go with it. You get the shift that you are "fit for"
    Even ones vacation is set by "when it is convenient for The hospital Requests for days off are frowned on and denied so many times.
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  3. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    0
    Quote from c.strong
    Big money. Well in 1980 Reg Nurses made $5.00 an hour. Minimum wage was $1.60 an hour The nurses in California united "a terrible Shame and went on strike Many months, I cannot remember. They held out and Their pay went to Base pay $25 an hour + years of nursing plus specialty areas. average of Patient ratio 5 to 1 Nurse. with assist of CNAs and orderlies (remember those guys) who helped lift and care for over wt Patients, and the severely handicapped 8 hour shifts. freedom to choose days to work. Acuityof Patients was not what is today
    Today nurse base pay is $25 an hour with no credit for years of nursing a little more for specialty areas $2-$3 dollars an hour. The Ratio is 10-12 to 1 nurse with 1 CNA no orderlies. 12 hour shifts. Acuity is much higher. Work shifts are mandatory swing at the required CHOICE OF ADMINISTRATION, and all the politics that go with it. You get the shift that you are "fit for"
    Even ones vacation is set by "when it is convenient for The hospital Requests for days off are frowned on and denied so many times.
    I agree with the sentiment of your post but you must work for a non-union hospital or other type of facility because everything you said in your last paragraph, with the one exception about acuity being higher, is completely opposite from my experiences at five different hospitals, and one of those was even non-union.
  4. Visit  callmeguest123456 profile page
    0
    In my opinion they make enough for what they do. There are other staff working the floor and all I ever see is stuff about the nurses. Where I work they are always getting raises, praises, recognition, but that's not true for everyone working in patient care. Very sad...this causes lots of tension between all floor staff. Everyone works hard for patients, nurses, aides, clerks, dietary, evs,etc.,
  5. Visit  GM2RN profile page
    4
    Quote from callmeguest123456
    In my opinion they make enough for what they do. There are other staff working the floor and all I ever see is stuff about the nurses. Where I work they are always getting raises, praises, recognition, but that's not true for everyone working in patient care. Very sad...this causes lots of tension between all floor staff. Everyone works hard for patients, nurses, aides, clerks, dietary, evs,etc.,
    Nurses don't get what they get because management wanted to make sure that nurses' pay was fair; they had to fight for it! You sound a little bitter, jealous, or both. If you feel that you don't get the raises or recognition that you deserve as a group then you need to organize and demand more. If you feel that you don't get the recognition you deserve as an individual, you need to look inward first and make sure that you are truly doing what deserves recognition. But I can tell you that if personal recognition and praise are that important to you, you may need to consider doing more or seek another position.
    PMFB-RN, ICUman, Rose_Queen, and 1 other like this.
  6. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    1
    I'd also like to add that given the level of skill required and the educational preparation (many hold Bachelors and Masters degrees, additional specialty certifications), nurses are not paid enough in many areas.

    Aides, housekeepers and dietary clerks also have essential roles, but there is no comparison to what nurses actually do. In fact, I can do their job, they cannot do mine.
    GM2RN likes this.
  7. Visit  nutella profile page
    0
    Yes - welcome to the "middle" of society where you do not qualify for any support and have to pay for all your expenses without the cushion.
    True, I have health insurance for example - but I also have to pay for all prescriptions, copays, deductibles .... unlike somebody who receives Medicaid. A nurse who lives in a high cost area can end up in debt easily when there is only one person making the income with kids...
  8. Visit  ArtClassRN profile page
    1
    Nursing offers something becoming rare in the US: a decent middle class income.

    Whether that implies "rolling in the dough" to someone ain't up to me.
    ICUman likes this.
  9. Visit  NickiLaughs profile page
    4
    Definitely depends on location. I'm at 130k working 64 hours in 2 weeks (4 8s on swing shift). I can pay the bills, little savings and have enough to save for a small vacay yearly. Not rolling in the dough, but we do have the luxury of my husband staying at home. So huge advantage.
    PMFB-RN, joanna73, GM2RN, and 1 other like this.
  10. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    2
    Quote from GM2RN
    You sound a little bitter, jealous, or both.
    Although I am pleased my older thread was resurrected from seemingly nowhere, I think the poster wanted to throw the rock into the crowd of nurses to enjoy whatever reaction that arose.
    SmilingBluEyes and joanna73 like this.
  11. Visit  negatron profile page
    3
    The only message that I got from this article is that children are expensive.
    Nici_Nurse, PMFB-RN, and Chew-POW like this.
  12. Visit  nutella profile page
    1
    Quote from negatron
    The only message that I got from this article is that children are expensive.
    You got that right!!!
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  13. Visit  vandiola profile page
    2
    No one in the UK has ever said nurses are rolling in dough :/ Average salary for a RN here is around 23-27 grand which is about 40-48 thousand dollars. Some nurses will never earn above that kind of money. In America nursing is considered quite a middle class career, in the UK it's still a bit of a working class profession. I guess it depends on where you live and what your definition of well paid is. I wouldn't say nursing here is well paid, in fact it's extremely poorly paid, but I can make a living with what I get. I'm happy I have no dependents otherwise I would have to consider a different career
    ICUman and PMFB-RN like this.

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