Did I deserve this?

  1. 3
    Last week the financial/business manager instructed me and a few CNA's ("teamleaders") that with any employee incidents, they have to be urine drug screened before they can go see the doctor for workman's comp.

    I work in an assisted living (I am an LPN) - So I think something qualifying as an incident (a slip and fall, trip down the stairs, resident breaking your wrist...) would justify a visit to the Dr.

    So while I was doing my rounds the other day, a CNA came up to me and said, "so and so bit me on the breast, she didn't draw blood or break skin, I'll call and let her know. She never called but filled out an incident sheet and placed it in this person's mailbox. She didn't go to the doctor and was fine.

    We work in the dementia/memory unit and so you expect the pinching, biting, scratching, hitting, etc as you would with any scared, dementia related resident.

    So, I get called down to the office the other day and this financial/business manager handed me a sheet and said she was writing me up for not calling her and doing a urine drug screen on this employee.

    Do you think I was in the wrong for not doing a drug screen on this employee? Are LPNs really responsible to perform drug screens on employees? This is the kind that you are to sit right outside the door, allow them to not wash their hands until you have the cup in your hand, etc (I think it's called chain in command?)

    I have never been written up before and I was literally tearing up before I even was able to walk down the hall to my office. You work so hard to do the best that you can for the residents and then you feel like all that hard work is worth nothing when someone tries to bring you down.
    Last edit by Joe V on Sep 14, '12 : Reason: spacing

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  2. 21 Comments...

  3. 5
    Was the employee trying to get workman's comp for the bite? If not, why would a urine/drug screen be needed? There is no way they can think that employees drug screening each other is a good idea. Who was designated to be responsible when incidents occur? If I'm understanding all of this correctly it's stupid and unfair to you. If they are going to start making up policies regarding incident reports or workman's comp they need to put it in writing and make sure everyone has been educated on the policy.
    missjenn, Orange Tree, norlns24, and 2 others like this.
  4. 4
    It is unfair- it's a very gray area. I thought that this is WAY out of scope for one CNA to screen another CNA. I am going to talk to the administrator tomorrow to clear the air. I would like a written policy handbook and an actual what to do when something happens- if someone gets a papercut and asks me for a bandaid am I suppose to run and get a drug kit and make that person pee in a cup and write an incident report? How many people are going to want to NOT report an incident because they may test positive?
    The employee wasn't wanting to go to the doctor- I was busy with my rounds and she just kind of mentioned so and so bit her but didn't draw blood or break skin. Not a big deal- alzheimer residents bite, hit, pinch, squeeze, pull hair, etc all kinds of stuff- so every time that stuff happens we have to write an incident report? I don't get it. I don't want to jeopardize my employment or feel like I have done something wrong when I really feel like I need to be better informed, and have something in writing. Thanks for the reply back!
    Wild Irish LPN, norlns24, Jory, and 1 other like this.
  5. 4
    if there is no policy regarding this requirement then you should not have the responsibility. Frankly, I do not think any co-worker should have that responsibility because there could be legal ramifications, chain of custody of the specimen and other issues.
    Rosenhammer, norlns24, VivaLasViejas, and 1 other like this.
  6. 2
    Yes, you need clear written guidelines on the policy. From what you said the employer did not need to see a doctor, so did not need a urine test. I would appeal the write up, hopefully there is a process for that
    VivaLasViejas and Got CPR? like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from jaelpn
    How many people are going to want to NOT report an incident because they may test positive?
    I think it was wrong for you to be written up, but the LEAST of my concerns is if someone is worried they will fail. I'm sorry.. If they know drugs are illegal and they do them they risk the loss of their job or worse. That isn't my problem or your problem it's theirs. I would want to know if someone is working under my license and is working under the influence..
  8. 0
    Quote from xoemmylouox
    I think it was wrong for you to be written up, but the LEAST of my concerns is if someone is worried they will fail. I'm sorry.. If they know drugs are illegal and they do them they risk the loss of their job or worse. That isn't my problem or your problem it's theirs. I would want to know if someone is working under my license and is working under the influence..
    So then, it's everyone's responsibility to drug test everyone else?

    A patient bit me and I mention it to a colleague, and it's fine if I'm subjected to a drug, even if I take no further action? That is pretty weird. Is the assumption that it's pretty likely that if a person gets hurt on the job, it's probably because he's high? It sounds like a good way for employers to not need to worry about unsafe working conditions.

    Maybe people should be forced to submit to a drug test when checking out at the grocery store. After all, the quality of the food they buy has serious health implications for them and their family.

    Don't worry about the false positive from that poppy seed bagel you just ate. It will be sorted out after you're fired for cause.
  9. 4
    "How many people are going to want to NOT report an incident because they may test positive? "

    Makes me wonder if this is their way of keeping worker comp claims down. Might be worth a call to the state labor board for clarification. The rules are pretty straight forward about reporting any and all injuries.......
    Not_A_Hat_Person, morte, Wet Noodle, and 1 other like this.
  10. 7
    Just a sort of related FYI:

    There are companies that hire nurses, train them in all things worker's comp to place in hospitals as well as other corporations as the "facility nurse" for employees to go to if there is illness or injury. You the employee think fine, it's the company nurse there to help me when in all actuality it is a nurse who is working as a risk reduction nurse - a corporate risk reduction liaison. That nurse is trained per their real employer to reduce worker's comp claims for the contract client by documenting and screening employees for worker's comp utilization risk. Totally on the wrong team.

    Be careful. Don't confide in the employee nurse. They might have other "duties" than just helping you when you are in need.
    Hoozdo, xoemmylouox, whichone'spink, and 4 others like this.
  11. 0
    Netglow, that is excellent advice. It's similar to what patients have to deal with when consulting with hospital-employed "patient advocates."


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