Cold weather causing pneumonia? *vent*

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    This is just a vent.. My grandma told my brother not to go outside without his jacket because he'd catch a cold..or even worse pneumonia. But according to my microbio textbook, this isn't true because colds are viruses and pneumonia is bacterial/viral/many other causes NOT related to weather. When I mentioned this (in front of my ENTIRE family) they laughed in my face and basically acted like I was a complete idiot. I told them that as a nursing student, I know to not give out any information unless it's referenced. But they replied that it's "common knowledge" that going out into the cold will cause these problems. Then my grandma had the nerve to say that because she was a "nurse" and I'm only a student that she was right and I was wrong. She's a nurse's aide/home care worker NOT a nurse. I corrected her and she was like "it's the same thing." Grrrr my family makes my mad sometimes. :angryfire Anyway I'm just wondering what you guys think about this... from what I've searched on the internet I can find no truth that cold causes colds.. the only thing I've found is that colds are more likely in winter due to everyone staying indoors in close contact with eachother. Is there ANY truth to colds causing colds/pneumonia? Also, I've had things happen like this before, how do you get people to believe you when you KNOW you're right about something? I've tried showing them reliable sources where I have the info, like textbooks and drug guides, but my families convinced I don't know what I'm talking about. This has caused me to have anxiety in clinicals with doing patient teaching, because I worry my patients will think I'm giving them unreliable info, but so far the clients I've had seem to appreciate the info I provide them with..Wow, that felt good to let that all out!
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    NO!!! You might be more susceptible because your immune system might be down when it's cold, but that's about it. I know how frustrated you are, my mom is the exact same way. Everytime the baby gets a cold she says it's because I didn't dress her warm enough.

    Note to Grandma.........."IT AIN'T THE SAME THING!!!"
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    i'm kind of old school myself. i think lowering your body temp causes your body to use up energy that it would be better off using to fight the hundreds of germs you come in contact with.

    plus, scientifically, i think that a lower temp causes a shift on the oxyhemoglobin curve to the left, causing O2 to have an affinity to rbcs and not easily releasing itself off to the needed cells that are always trying to keep those awful invaders from causing havoc, making us sick.
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    Quote from tridil2000
    i'm kind of old school myself. i think lowering your body temp causes your body to use up energy that it would be better off using to fight the hundreds of germs you come in contact with.

    plus, scientifically, i think that a lower temp causes a shift on the oxyhemoglobin curve to the left, causing O2 to have an affinity to rbcs and not easily releasing itself off to the needed cells that are always trying to keep those awful invaders from causing havoc, making us sick.

    Yes, cold weather can lower your immunity, but it doesn't give you colds or pneumonia! Those little bugs are not floating around in the air looking for scantily clad bodies to invade.
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    My grandmother told my mom that letting wind get on the baby is what caused colic.
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    My ex-husband's grandmother chastized me for changing my son's diaper while he way laying on the carpeted floor. Said I would give him pneumonia.

    I agree - while it MAY lower your immunity to get cold, you don't get pneumonia from that. And I'm not convinced it lowers your immunity - might just build it up.

    steph
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    I'm vote for immunity lowering and also excess energy used when you are cold. I notice whenever I have gotten caught out in the rain and gotten soaking wet and shivering cold, I always get sick within 3 days. I fully believe that if you are shivering from being freezing cold for an extended period of time, then your body mechanisms may be working harder to keep you warm and allowing any pathogen that you may have been exposed to to flourish. I need to do some research on this during the winter break when I have time...
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    Are you sure we don't share the same family? No, it does not give you pneumonia. If that was the case no one would be going outside when it was cold. The streets would be deserted.

    My grandma makes comments to me (during August - in Indiana) that I need to put long fleece pants on my nieces or they'll catch a cold. Ha! The only thing they'll catch is her ignorance. My nieces other grandma told my sil to buy fleece pj's with footies and put long sleeve fleece pants on them with socks and put them in a long sleeve onesie...........during summer.
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    My mother-in-law was just diagnosed with pneumonia and she's convinced it's because went and mowed the lawn without earmuffs or a jacket (it was about 50 degrees out). Then both my father-in-law and mother-in-law freaked out when they discovered I was having my son take a shower and then walk out to the car (he's got VERY short hair that dries rather quickly). They said he would catch pneumonia. Well, I go out quite a bit with wet hair, no jacket, no shoes, etc. and have had the flu ONCE in my life and never have I gotten a cold after doing any of these things. And certainly not pneumonia. But this is the woman who believes you can catch all kind of things from a toilet seat and spends 5 minutes covering the damn thing up before she'll pee. I've shown her the studies that prove a public toilet seat is cleaner than a public telephone, your work desk, an ATM machine, etc. but she refuses to believe me. Parents!

    Melanie = )
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    Our parents always said eating to much candy would give you a bellyache too. How many of us proved that theory wrong?


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