CNA and report

  1. 0
    How do hospital CNA's get report? Is it just between CNA/CNA or does the CNA hear report with the RN?
    If it's CNA to CNA, what is discussed? How long does it take? ( I know census can make a difference. I'm looking for averages).

    We need to fix our system and I'm looking for input.

    Thanks!
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  4. 15 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    At my hospital, floors vary. The aides give each other report from a sheet they make up themselves. It has: last name, sex, age, gait abilities, 02 requirements, diet and anything special they should know. They give each other report and then update once a shift with the RN thats on. Average about 10 mins or less, usually about 20 pts.
    tokmom likes this.
  6. 1
    At my hospital CNA's give report to other CNA's. However, the RN's are supposed to be giving a report to the CNA's. That is actually hospital policy, but it's rarely ever done that way. You can't always trust another CNA's report. I am a CNA and NS and during many reports the previous shift CNA has forgotten to tell me important details like if they are AC & HS, why they are on contact precautions, or other significant details. I usually always try to get a report from each patients RN.
    tokmom likes this.
  7. 1
    If it's any help, when I worked on the floor, the CNAs did CNA to CNA report, the nurses did nurse to nurse, and then I got with the CNA for my patients to make sure nothing had been left out -- NPO after midnight, changes in FSBS (like a q6h going to a AC/HS), and mobility orders (bedrest now able to be OOB to chair) had a habit of not getting passed on from day to night. And I always tried to make sure if there was a diet change (like clears to full, or full to regular) I made sure the oncoming nurse AND the CNA knew. It took about 20 minutes for the CNAs to report off to each other, and they did it as a group, and focused on who was a total, partial or self care, who had been given a bath, who needed a bath before an AM procedure, who was a DNR, who was a full code, who might code, who was a fall risk, or who liked to slip out to smoke, etc. We had a "charge" CNA who did the CNA equivalent of the charge nurse, she took pts, but precepted new CNAs, tended to take the worst pts, kept an eye on everybody and reported straight to the charge RN.
    tokmom likes this.
  8. 1
    Quote from nerdtonurse?
    If it's any help, when I worked on the floor, the CNAs did CNA to CNA report, the nurses did nurse to nurse, and then I got with the CNA for my patients to make sure nothing had been left out -- NPO after midnight, changes in FSBS (like a q6h going to a AC/HS), and mobility orders (bedrest now able to be OOB to chair) had a habit of not getting passed on from day to night. And I always tried to make sure if there was a diet change (like clears to full, or full to regular) I made sure the oncoming nurse AND the CNA knew. It took about 20 minutes for the CNAs to report off to each other, and they did it as a group, and focused on who was a total, partial or self care, who had been given a bath, who needed a bath before an AM procedure, who was a DNR, who was a full code, who might code, who was a fall risk, or who liked to slip out to smoke, etc. We had a "charge" CNA who did the CNA equivalent of the charge nurse, she took pts, but precepted new CNAs, tended to take the worst pts, kept an eye on everybody and reported straight to the charge RN.
    How do you like the "charge CNA" position? Did it help the CNA's on your floor? I think our unit would benefit from a position like this.
    tokmom likes this.
  9. 0
    When I worked as a CNA we had a taped report on our floor. We told code status, vital signs, if they wore a protective brief and what size, what type of alarms they had ( bed/chair), how many people it took to ambulate, how many it took for care, if they needed assistance to eat, if there was anything special ( elopement/isolation/visitor) considerations. We would also tell how the day went and any changes that would be nice to know ( explosive bm, vomitting, not eating)
  10. 1
    I give report to my charge nurse; she relays it to the oncoming RN's and CNA's.
    tyvin likes this.
  11. 0
    I used to work as a tech, and we would give report to each other without the RN. We just went through the patients and how they were the last 8-12 hours. I would mention:

    *whether they were alert or confused
    *any sitter cases
    *patients who have bed/chair alarms
    *patient activity level (up ad lib/up with assist/bed rest)
    *diet (mainly those who were NPO)
    *blood sugars
    *patients who are incontinent
    *those who need to be turned
    *patients who have a foley, colostomy, or some sort of drain (such as a hemovac or JP) or all of the above
    *vitals: who were to be done Q4, Q8 and Q12. If a patient's BP was running a little low during the shift, or say if the patient has been running a temp, I would mention it to the CNA/tech coming on.
  12. 0
    PLEASE READ THIS!!! I HAVE A QUESTION

    Hello everyone,
    My name is Morgain. I'm currently waiting on my letter from CCRI for the CNA program that should start this month. So I have gone online and looked up all the CNA abbreviations that I could find and might learn in class. I have learned 300 hundred or so abbreviations. My question is do you think I can buy the CNA textbooks and work book that will be used in class? Yes, I know most people think im crazy for thinking about doing work even though I havent been completely accepted in the program yet but I had trouble in high school so im just trying to get ahead. I also have a 18 month old son and take care of my grandma who had a stroke last yr alone. I was told that the textbooks and work books that im trying to get now is free if I just wait. if someone could just please respond back to this I would be greatly appreciated. I will be calling the school in a few hours to see what they say too. Any kind of extra help I can get will be great. Thanks for all you all's time.

    Sincerely,
    Morgain C
  13. 1
    It's different everywhere but the best IMO was when I worked in a place that after nurse to nurse report then the nurses would give report to the CNAs. Both of us, CNAs and RNs, would get together after initial report for about 10 minutes and give each other report.

    Many times I would find out important information from the CNA going on shift that wasn't deemed important by the off going RN but defiantly influenced patient outcome. Communication is key.
    Poi Dog likes this.


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