Choosing RN Students

  1. 90 out of 300 gets picked for RN program at our 2 year college. How do they choose students for RN program? grades etc...?
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   Angelica
    My program went strictly be grades (pre-reqs counted double, as I recall). There was essentially no competition when I was accepted. My class started with 50, which was about the number that applied (I live in a small community)
  4. by   KevinN
    Same here, highest GPA for 4 prerequisite classes ( Algebra, English Comp, Psychology and Anatomy Physiology1) were the first to be considered, However if students had the same GPA on these first 4 prerequisite classes then the number of support classes finished were the determining factor, and finally if students had the same GPA on the 4 prerequisite classes and the same number of support classes finished, then the overall GPA for all classes taken in college determined who was accepted. The lowest GPA that was accepted in the nursing program I will be attending on the 4 prerequisite classes was 3.56.
  5. by   Angelica
    Kevin-
    What is your worm saying? I can't quite make it out.
  6. by   AllieElizAbeth
    thank you for your post.
  7. by   Zee_RN
    Angelica, it looks like the worm is saying I WANT JAVA (lol).

    When I applied for nursing school in 1993, we had to take the NLN Entrance Exam. There were 1200 applicants for 120 seats. They took the top 10% of those who passed the test.
  8. by   twarlik
    Originally posted by AllieElizAbeth
    90 out of 300 gets picked for RN program at our 2 year college. How do they choose students for RN program? grades etc...?
    70 out of 300 were chosen for the program I am starting in August. I don't know exactly how the decisions are made, but from what I understand it is based upon many factors. They look at GPA and the number of pre-reqs you have completed at the time you apply. There are also other factors which I believe are considered like race, sex (male students are smiled upon), participation in ROTC (pretty much guaranteed admission from what I understand) and they also give special consideration to returning students. In addition to this, there is an essay which plays into the process somehow. Truth be told, some of their admission decisions had students scratching their heads. There were some students who were thought to be shoe-in's, but didn't get in and others who seemed like long-shot's but did get in.
    So, in answer to your question...I don't really know how they make admission decisions. I suppose they could just be using a gypsy with a crystal ball...

    Todd
  9. by   KristinWW
    I was an Allied Health Advisor in another life (5 years ago) and a corp trainer for a healthcare corp. and we absolutely could NOT use race or sex as factors. Initial point system was blind (meaning points tallied, no names) and as I understand this is still in effect. If you are exploring a community college there are about 5 factors: GPA, prior healthcare experience, no of courses successfully completed toward the degree, state resident, NLN scores.

    The situation now is that the deck is more evenly stacked with more applicants, and sometimes the decision comes down to interviews. Hope this helps!
  10. by   Ortho_RN
    The school I go to, uses NLN score and GPA... They use a point system..
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    I have been told public Associate degree programs in California have a lottery system. That is supposed to end discrimination against the late bloomers and ESL students.

    When I applied it was GPA, SAT, and letters of recommendation. I improved my GPA by taking a 5 unit class while working full time nights and being Mom to Jr. High and and High school kids. That 'A' sent me to the top of the waiting list. The letters from nursing managers and supervisors where I worked as an LVN helped too. I went from 3.6 to 3.7. Enough to get in.

    Now there are state sponsored scholarships and loans that are forgiven if you work in certain areas after graduation. They give preference to LVNs and certified nursing assistants because the drop out rate is lower for them.
    My BSN program was easy to get in. No clinical so BIG classes.
  12. by   Jen2
    The school I am attending divides the applicants (200, they pick 40) into categories. They have a category for non-traditional, high school senior, and minority. Out of these categories highest GPA is considered, with a large emphasis on science related pre-reqs. The school says that they do this for diversity. Personally I don't think it's fair because why should someone with a lower GPA get accepted just because they are in a different category? They say that they must pick so many from each of the categories.
  13. by   KristinWW
    Hey Jen - what??? Do you mind if I ask which school? That rots. I'm from PA.....
  14. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by Jen2
    The school I am attending divides the applicants (200, they pick 40) into categories. They have a category for non-traditional, high school senior, and minority. Out of these categories highest GPA is considered, with a large emphasis on science related pre-reqs. The school says that they do this for diversity. Personally I don't think it's fair because why should someone with a lower GPA get accepted just because they are in a different category? They say that they must pick so many from each of the categories.
    Not so for me years ago or now. I am not white and got no preference.

    Th University of California system has removed any 'affermative action'. Unfortunateley there is so much competition very qualified students of all groups are turned down. A 4.0 without advanced placement in high school disqualifies an applicant to medical school who earned a 4.0 in college.
    Poor school systems with a low tax base have no advances placement classes so those students cannot attend the more affordable state university. That is geographic discrimination based on family income.

    The UC also eliminated its undergraduate nursing program. You can earn a BSN, MSN, NP, CNS, and PHD in nursing but have to be licensed first. Grades do count for admission and the various tests.

    Nursing programs need to be added!

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