Calling all nurses...did you ever wonder if you could do it? - page 2

:confused: I just was curious on how many nurses felt in doubt in whether they could get through nursing school, before they entered and during nursing school, and after too I guess. How did you get... Read More

  1. by   Tweety
    The first year I was full of doubt. Never dreamed I would make it. I had a rough first quarter because I was the only one in my section who wasn't a CNA or LPN and I was very nervous. I got a "marginal" my first clinical. After that I did o.k. My second year I hit my stride and began to discover I was doing a "calling" and never doubted after that.

    My first year on the floor as a nurse I was full of "what have I gotten myself into?" thoughts.
  2. by   teeituptom
    Howdy yall
    from dep in the heart of texas

    After all these years. I never had any doubts in school I would make it, and I never had any doubts that I would do well in nursing.




    doo wah ditty
  3. by   AnnieRN
    I don't recall my own fear of failure as I would have to look back twenty years but I do remember some of my classmates fears...I was already a seasoned LPN when I returned to get my RN and I would often help my clinical group trouble shoot various problems as I was a lot less intimidating than the instructor. Our instructor caught wind of this and made an announcement in pre-conference that people were not to come to me with questions but to find a staff member or ask her. This one pair of "older" students who were so afraid that they would screw up were particularly bothered by this but decided to find their own way. Well seems their patient passed on(hospice) and they needed to take the body to the morgue. This hospital had a special stretcher that concealed the corpse. The poor students, not wanting to ask for help,couldn't figure out how to secure the body on top of the stretcher(no side rails as the body was to go under the top). So they decided to "maintain saftey" by using reams of kerlex and tied this body to the top of the stretcher and wheeled it down the hall! I think they got extra points for inginuity that day. And they also graduated.
  4. by   LoisJean
    I never had one doubt about school or whether or not I'd make it as a nurse...and tho I opted not to continue into the realm of RN, I never stopped listening, learning and persueing...pushing my way into nursing experiences that furthered my confidence. But, that was a long time ago and..... I do have doubts now.

    As the years pile up and another notice comes to renew my license, I have doubts as to whether I'm going to or not... not because I am not interested in working as a nurse anymore or because I doubt myself, but because I'm not totally certain what nursing is anymore...I am not certain that I fit into it anymore.

    I am glad those of you who are starting out, getting your feet good and wet, have doubts--I know you will find that those doubts are normal for the situation you are in at present- (and if it is fear creating the doubt then remember: FEAR is FALSE EVIDENCE APPEARING REAL.)

    Still, I hope that before I take my last breath on this earth, that one or two of you will have refined the defination of nursing so that I can leave this world knowing, without a doubt, what it really is.

    Peace,
    Lois Jean
  5. by   purplemania
    to the soon to be nurses: when you begin to practice you will find that many tasks are repetitive and get easier. Learning from seasoned nurses will help and one day it just all falls into place. Think of school as an endurance race. Just take one step at a time.
  6. by   finallyRN
    I don't remember having great doubts about being a nurse while going through school. I know that starting out in Med surg as a new grad and also during my training for labor and delivery, I doubted wether or not I would survive, if I was cut out for the job. In the long run it was all o.k.
    I don't think these fears are only related to nursing. I think any new experience is stressful and can creat doubt as to one's ability. The fact that we have other people lives in our hands at times only compounds the stress and doubt.
    As a now "slightly" experienced nurse I agree it is about taking it all one step at a time. Concentrate on one new thing at a time. It will all come to you with experience.
  7. by   karenG
    I never doubted that I wanted to be a nurse but did doubt my ability to be one! I still (after 22yrs) come across things I know nothing about- so its all about life long learning! Havent worked in a hospital for 14yrs- now the thought of working in one terrifies me- all that equipement- I could kill someone!!

    so take it one day at time and always be prepared to say when you dont know something or cant do something, not easy to say sometimes but I have great respect for people who are honest rather than try and bumble through!!

    Karen
  8. by   talkall
    to this day I still have doughts and guess what I graduated today, gawd that walk across the stage was so long and I was convinced I would trip over the steps coming down anyway I'm now a nurse and I still have doughts doughts as to whether I will be a good staff nurse weather I will be able to cope with the extra responsibility
  9. by   researchrabbit
    When I was 18, I would NEVER have believed I would make it through nursing school, mostly because I believed it was not a profession that suited me. I was not going to be a nurse.

    However, when I went back at age 40 for nursing school, I never doubted I would finish school (I'm good at school, I could be a professional student if only someone would pay for it).
  10. by   Ted
    I never really doubted my abilities to make it through nursing school and practicing nursing.

    Just kept focused. Studied like crazy. Quit all my jobs (I was able to do this, thanks to my loving wife Amy) during my last year of nursing school and "did what I had to do".

    Interestingly, Amy is now in nursing school. She, too, is fiercely focused. . . getting all "A's" in her studies. We're already talking about her quitting her current job(s) (even slowing down our personal entertainment business! ) during her last year of nursing school. I already have a second job. . . actually my third job. . . . actually my FOURTH job (!!!) with this one as a per diem nurse for another hospital. . . and being the sole financial provider for a year. As it should be!

    A supporting family is an exceedingly important element in one's nursing education. Hope you're supported by your family. Know that you're supported by this "Allnurses.com" family! Know that you are not alone. . . .

    There's some really great words of advice found here in this thread!

    Way cool!

    Cheers!

    Ted
  11. by   fab4fan
    Oh, yes...I even dropped out for a year.

    It's a marathon, and you have to sometimes take it an hour at a time. I remember thinking that Maalox had to be the best invention in the history of Western Civilization.
  12. by   vashka25
    I never pictured myself as a nurse.....eww nekkid people and bodily fluids...
    Then I applied for the heck of it..... and doubted I would get in.
    Then I made it thru first year with honours....and doubted second would be as easy.
    Then I made it thru second year...broken bones and all.... and doubted I could finish....
    Then third year came......and I doubted I'd make it through after taking a year off to mend the broken bones......
    and you know what...I'm three weeks away from leaping beyond that doubt too !!!!!!!
    Sometimes it just feels good to prove yourself wrong !!!!

    ~Live the life you love.....and love the life you live~
  13. by   Kayzee
    I went back to school at a later age. i think it made a big difference. I enjoyed school, and did not have doubts about passing. I studied my butt off though!

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