Call to organ donation center post pt death - page 2

Hi there - I'm questioning a policy my hospital has and am wondering what other hospitals do. I have not encountered this at other hospitals mainly because they've been larger, and have had "death coordinators" to do this, so I... Read More

  1. 5
    Quote from netglow
    Seriously though, the coordinator is informed in no uncertain terms of "expectations" during the face to face interview. Coordinators are heavily trained, lots of scripting. If the family is all for donation, it's a breeze and there is no pressuring anybody. It's a real bear of a job if they don't lay down easily, and the turnover is extremely high due to not meeting quota and when it dawns on the coordinator what their job really is, hard to ignore that if you have feelings and values. Hence, some OPOs have stopped hiring healthcare professionals... it's a 'can you live with yourself when you suddenly realized what you are doing for a living' problem, and healthcare folks realize "it" right away. Once consent is won, then another group entirely handles the family afterwards. Lots of heavy interaction and counseling in the form of debriefing and moulding of impression of what all just went down. Families more often than not will latch on to what the OPO after event counselors impart as how to think about what the hell just happened, it's easier than going nuts. BTW, I have interviewed at an OPO in the past, and saw all behind the curtain, so to speak.
    This has certainly not been my experience. The coordinators I work with are very supportive of families regardless of the family's decision. I don't think interviewing for a job gives you inside info on how things are done.
    Hoozdo, KelRN215, Altra, and 2 others like this.

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  2. 4
    Back to the thread

    Small hospital here too. We have to call the donor number following every death. Last call I made was VERY lengthy. I'd never had anybody ask me that many detailed questions. Lab, VS, and Xray reports.
    What made me angry was that both admitting diagnoses made the deceased ineligible for donation. All donation. I found that out after about 30 minutes of detailed questions. I couldn't for the life of me figure out why we had to dance the dance, when the answer to the first question eliminated my pt as a donor. I understand completely about protocol, but yikes! Let's be reasonable.
    WeepingAngel, nrsang97, Esme12, and 1 other like this.
  3. 5
    The good thing about it being an outside group is that it takes away from the family the impression that we've killed their family member to get their organs. It's a good thing. It's not a violation of HIPAA. It's the same for all of us.
    anotherone, KelRN215, nrsang97, and 2 others like this.
  4. 2
    Having been on both sides of the organ donation experience (my grandfather was a heart recipient, my step-mother unexpected resp arrest post op), I can say that we were far from pressured to consent. While we also did immediately agree, it was all done with much compassion and care from everyone involved.
    nuangel1 and nrsang97 like this.
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    I am not a fan of the current organ donation process. I have done it probably three times and all three times were as described above. They know after the diagnosis/age/comorbidities/TOD that it is not viable, yet they go on and on and on with the questions. I assume that they get paid by the length of the phone call, probably get an on-call rate that jumps significantly when actively recruiting.
    netglow likes this.
  6. 4
    What I think we need to remember here that while there are federal regulations about organ donation.....like everything else in healthcare each and every state have their own requirements, each procurement organization have their own policies and negotiate what is done by each facility .... AND......each facility has their own policy and procedure about their own process.

    Talk about consistency.......could it get any more confusing?

    I also think we need to LISTEN to each other and realize that the information provided by individuals will vary and that AN has members from all over the world and they probably have NO CLUE what we are talking about or have completely different information. Lets be tolerant and be polite when we read each others perspective about this process.

    OP....the information you provide is decided by law and is still...the care of patient. Families don't have a lot of say in this process, which I believe isn't right...but it is what it is.

    You mentioned NEOB and I have dealt with them...their process is...shall I say....intense. I know that they can be difficult to deal with especially when they feel you are not "on board with the process". (personal experience) The first few times I called them I was not comfortable either....you will get better at the information...and how to stop the interrogation from them....but they can really drag....I men prolong the process which always amazed me. I got it down to about 15 min with NEOB.

    When I lived in the Midwest....I dealt with ROBI and yes most OPO's are very scripted....they have to be organ procurement is, unfortunately, not a topic for casual dinner conversation.

    I think every nurse needs to examine his/her feelings about organ procurement and organ donation...I happen to be a HUGE proponent so my comfort level in dealing with families is ok.....each nurse needs to find their own way. OP you aren't breaching patient confidentiality.....and their question/answer interrogation is intense..... I feel it should be done be the supervisors but many supervisors aren't comfortable with it either so they have the staff call....You will get better at it....eventually
    Last edit by Esme12 on Mar 11, '13
    nuangel1, samadams8, nrsang97, and 1 other like this.
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    what if you have a family that for religious reasons will absolutely refuse to donate? do you tell the procurement person that, and they stop? and this whole scenario proves Lamaze's point that HIPAA only makes it harder for the wrong persons to find out your info....
    LogCabinMom and Esme12 like this.
  8. 1
    Quote from barbyann
    I am not a fan of the current organ donation process. I have done it probably three times and all three times were as described above. They know after the diagnosis/age/comorbidities/TOD that it is not viable, yet they go on and on and on with the questions. I assume that they get paid by the length of the phone call, probably get an on-call rate that jumps significantly when actively recruiting.
    As Esme and I have said SOP varies for OPOs but there is a base that is common to all. From what was outlined to me, there is no "rate" situation, it's shift work 24 hour coverage. Often there is some part of the body that can still be harvested... that rep needs to root out any possibility because they have to in order to reach their quota, or be out of a job. This is why they are so persistent. Remember, tissue, bone as well.

    I'll just state again, I am not against organ donation, I just don't like the fact that a family somewhere is hurting and suddenly they are on such a strange plane in the scheme of things. Their absolute misery results in suddenly possessing a commodity that will make somebody else a lot of money, but will also possibly enhance the life of others. That is a wierd thing in itself. And then, there are other people who must make numbers, to keep the dollars coming in, or be out of a job. I think if feet were not held to fire, the process would be more honest all around.
    barbyann likes this.
  9. 0
    I've called NEOB twice and I was only on the phone for a couple of minutes.
  10. 0
    Quote from morte
    what if you have a family that for religious reasons will absolutely refuse to donate? do you tell the procurement person that, and they stop? and this whole scenario proves Lamaze's point that HIPAA only makes it harder for the wrong persons to find out your info....
    I asked that. No they still approach. They have info on various religions too and still will pursue the family with specific strategy. They might change who takes that case based on that. Now of course, if things get really crazy then they back off finally and lose the case, of course.


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