Attitude....

  1. I have been wondering how to research this, and I thought 'Allnurses - perfect!' Anyway, as anyone who has read these posts must realize, nursing is a highly demanding profession physically, emotionally and intellectually. The stress is just unbelievable. At the moment, the general atmosphere on my unit is awful. People complaining about co-workers, e-mailing nasties to the bosses, etc. A PCA floated to our unit the other day and said she loved it compared to the back biting that went on where she usually worked. This led me to wonder how can a supportive, enjoyable work environment be fostered, regardless of the state of the health care system today (ie: workloads, etc). Can it be done? Does anyone work on a unit that they love to come into? What makes that difference? Is it strong management, or a strong, collective workforce? What can be done by us, the 'workers', to turn a nasty atmosphere around? Any suggestions would be appreciated!
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   VickyRN
    Generally, it flows from the top. If management is mean, overbearing, then there tends to be an increase in horizontal violence--meanness, backbiting, animosities, etc. The nurses tend to take out their frustrations on one another.
  4. by   live4today
    Originally posted by Repat
    I have been wondering how to research this, and I thought 'Allnurses - perfect!' Anyway, as anyone who has read these posts must realize, nursing is a highly demanding profession physically, emotionally and intellectually. The stress is just unbelievable.................

    how can a supportive, enjoyable work environment be fostered, regardless of the state of the health care system today (ie: workloads, etc). Can it be done? Does anyone work on a unit that they love to come into? What makes that difference? Is it strong management, or a strong, collective workforce? What can be done by us, the 'workers', to turn a nasty atmosphere around? Any suggestions would be appreciated!
    Hmmm...very thought provoking, Repat!

    I love the question, and would like to reply by saying YES...it can be done...ONE by ONE...one employee at a time without allowing the negative flow of energy on the unit to affect one's own personal disposition in regards to how one behaves or carries his/herself while on the job...be it nursing or nonnursing.

    I work on a cardiac unit. I love cardiac. I love learning cardiac, so this is a great start to my day when I leave home to go work on the cardiac unit.

    While I am working, I give the BEST of myself that I can give. I don't worry about what I am not able to physically, mentally, emotionally, or spiritually contribute to the unit AS LONG AS I know at the end of each workday that I have given the very best that I could possibly give.

    No one human being is responsible for how another human being chooses to carry themselves. Each human being is personally responsible for themselves. It is vital to one's surivival to acknowledge that the best foot put forward only means the best positive energy surrounding you all the day long...each and every day.

    Keep in mind that we all have our "negative moments" no matter how hard we try not to, so some days a person who is usually upbeat and positive to work with may be having "a personal moment". Just think how much better it will be for that person having a "temporary down period" to be around others who are conscious of the fact that we all have "negative moments" from time to time, so with that understanding, our positive energy will boost that other person's spirits before the day's end.

    Interesting topic to discuss, Repat!
    Last edit by live4today on Apr 14, '03
  5. by   Love-A-Nurse
    it is hard to point a finger because i have worked where the "middle man" had more power the the " immediately head man". it seems to reason that what ever way you tend to run your home, work is a product of that, if this makes sense.
  6. by   Tweety
    It starts with me. If I'm to expect positivity them I'm to set the example. It isn't easy in an atomosphere of gossip and negativity, but I try.

    It doesn't always work. I just left a unit that was horribly negative and toxic to me due to several (like five) strong and negative personalities.
  7. by   traumaRUs
    Like third shift guy - it's what you make of it. If you choose to be negative, than even the best place will be negative. However, if you choose to make the best of things and be positive, then its a good experience. Its all in your perception.
  8. by   Love-A-Nurse
    originally posted by 3rdshiftguy
    it starts with me. if i'm to expect positivity them i'm to set the example. it isn't easy in an atomosphere of gossip and negativity, but i try.

    it doesn't always work. i just left a unit that was horribly negative and toxic to me due to several (like five) strong and negative personalities.
    great post!
  9. by   nurse2002
    This i what I have started to do. I go into to work..okay they float to a unit that is staffed with employees with a negative attitde. I walk onto the unit acting like I love everyone who works there. They say something negative and I dont even respond. I work my butt off, smile and try to make them wonder why I am so happy. If they really knew what I was thinking they would be shocked. I can think words they have never heard before.

    I get my work finished and im out of there. Watching my back the whole way.

    What keeps me going on units like this are my patients.
  10. by   NsgTiger
    I think that it has to come from the top. I know that on my unit there is a lot of animosity due the lack of support from management. We are all over-worked, stressed out, etc. and it seems like management doesn't care. It just burns me up when mgt. comes in taking all nice making promises but nothing ever gets done. Then when it comes down to it, mgt. just sells the staff down the river...grrr! Sorry, I did not mean to get off on a rant. But seriuosly, I do try to be positive. It is just hard to keep bouncing back with a smiling face.
  11. by   Repat
    Guys, I feel more positive already!! I definitely go into work determined to enjoy my patients, and generally I do (which is why, I think, I often get the 'difficult' ones). But I guess I'll gear up my determination to enjoy my coworkers. You all are right - I can only work on MY attitude, and hopefully it will trickle down.
  12. by   renerian
    edited.
    Last edit by RN2be on Apr 14, '03
  13. by   passing thru
    An appropriate thread for this week. It applies at work and at the keyboard. Looks like "ATTITUDE' is the "topic of the week" , whether at work or at leisure.
  14. by   passing thru
    Repat:
    I think you are talking about unit morale too.
    There's lots of info available on the net about motivating a group of workers. First, do they want change? There is POWER in the negativity.
    The meek-passive workers will "go along with" the vocal negative complainers, in the interest of keeping the peace or to avoid escalating the complainers criticisms.
    We have to understand the underlying (and dynamic)
    mechanisms of the communication on the unit. Even if it is dysfunctional, it serves someone's purpose.
    Usually those complaining the most are the ones in control.

    Look at how successful businesses - and the military, for instance-
    motivate their people and how they create working relationships.
    Then, you will see how it is done.
    It requires leadership, a group commitment, goals, focus, rewards.

    Learning how to motivate people is one of the most gratifying
    experiences we experience, whether it is co-workers, our children, our associates.
    And you're really good if simultaneously, you build their self-esteem.

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