Associates degree nurse salary vs. bachelor's ??

  1. 0 Hello,

    Is it common that Associates degree RNs make the same as Bachelor's degree RNs in a hospital staff nurse position? I plan on moving to New York after I get my RN as an associate and eventually gain a Bachelor's at their NYU. Does anyone know specifically in New York what salary they hire starting associaites RN nurses at ???

    THANK YOU!!!
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  3. Visit  Strawberrygirl2 profile page

    About Strawberrygirl2

    From 'Washington'; 23 Years Old; Joined May '09; Posts: 47; Likes: 16.

    15 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  Pmdc profile page
    5
    "Is it common that Associates degree RNs make the same as Bachelor's degree RNs in a hospital staff nurse position?"

    There usually isn't a huge difference in pay, at least in my experience. I think it's about 25 cents an hour at my facility. The differences I have found are that there are more opportunities available for those with the higher educational levels.

    Another non-monetary advantage that I have found is that the BSN courses that I had in physical assessment, pathophysiology, and pharmacology gave me more knowledge in providing direct patient care. I went in to the BSN program thinking it was mostly just management type courses, but I found it to be more than that.

    So, to answer the question: You won't see much difference in pay on a paycheck to paycheck basis. But, over the course of your career, your earning potential will likely be higher due to increased career opportunities.
    Otessa, 2B1WhoSaves, tewdles, and 2 others like this.
  5. Visit  OC_An Khe profile page
    1
    Agree with the above post. In addition even a few dollars more in the paycheck makes a huge difference over time. It also over time significantly increases the value of retirement benefits. Particularly in 401k/403b plans when your contribution is based on a percentage of pay with an employer match.
    mamamerlee likes this.
  6. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    Don't know about back east where you are but here in Wisconsin there is not difference at all at any of Wisconsin's larger hospitals and none I know of is any of the smaller ones at the bedside staff nurse level. At my particular hospital an associates degree perpared new grad is at a huge advantage when applying to the ICU nurse residency prorgam over a BSN prepared grad nurse.
    vivacious1healer likes this.
  7. Visit  April, RN profile page
    0
    There is no difference in pay where I work. However, they will only hire new grads with a BSN.
  8. Visit  Ahhphoey profile page
    1
    No difference in pay here. I have a MSN and this has no impact on my pay, but has opened the door for other opportunities which I'm exploring now.
    Otessa likes this.
  9. Visit  imaRN08 profile page
    2
    there is no difference in pay where i work either... but then again, its Iowa, so we all get paid like crap anyways
    S.N. Visit and mamamerlee like this.
  10. Visit  ukstudent profile page
    0
    No difference in pay for ASN, BSN or MSN, here in DC.

    I did notice in your post that you want to go to NY after graduation. Please think hard on this. If you look at posts from NY, you will see that many of the hospitals are on a hiring freeze. And the few new grads being hired are BSN's.
  11. Visit  Reno1978 profile page
    1
    It's a $1.00 difference at my facility. Doesn't sound like much, but $2000/year isn't bad, if you work somewhere like this for many years.
    WindyhillBSN likes this.
  12. Visit  Pmdc profile page
    0
    [QUOTE=PMFB-RN;3968313]Don't know about back east where you are but here in Wisconsin there is not difference at all at any of Wisconsin's larger hospitals and none I know of is any of the smaller ones at the bedside staff nurse level. At my particular hospital an associates degree perpared new grad is at a huge advantage when applying to the ICU nurse residency prorgam over a BSN prepared grad nurse.[/QUOTE]

    Why? Just curious.
  13. Visit  Aymese profile page
    0
    [quote=Pmdc;3969289]
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Don't know about back east where you are but here in Wisconsin there is not difference at all at any of Wisconsin's larger hospitals and none I know of is any of the smaller ones at the bedside staff nurse level. At my particular hospital an associates degree perpared new grad is at a huge advantage when applying to the ICU nurse residency prorgam over a BSN prepared grad nurse.[/QUOTE]

    Why? Just curious.
    I'd like to know why as well. This has not been the preference in any of the 2 hospitals I have worked in. An Associates degree nurse may be at an advantage for about 4-6 months when it comes to hands on skills simply because of the greater amount of time spent in clinical hours. Anyone can learn a hands-on skill, in my opinion (ie. starting IVs, passing meds, dressing changes, etc). As soon as they start working, a BSN will catch up, so to speak, within a few short months. Many people will say a BSN program will better prepare you in your "critical thinking skills" - a necessary skill in many areas of nursing, including ICU, obvioiusly.
  14. Visit  caliotter3 profile page
    0
    It is common for one pay rate for all RNs, regardless of education. Occasionally one may encounter an employer that will pay an RN with a BSN .25 to .75 more per hour.
  15. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    [quote=Aymese;3969353]
    Quote from Pmdc

    I'd like to know why as well. This has not been the preference in any of the 2 hospitals I have worked in. An Associates degree nurse may be at an advantage for about 4-6 months when it comes to hands on skills simply because of the greater amount of time spent in clinical hours. Anyone can learn a hands-on skill, in my opinion (ie. starting IVs, passing meds, dressing changes, etc). As soon as they start working, a BSN will catch up, so to speak, within a few short months. Many people will say a BSN program will better prepare you in your "critical thinking skills" - a necessary skill in many areas of nursing, including ICU, obvioiusly.
    *** Well I don't think that BSN prepared nurses have any advantage in critical thinking skills. Some nurses do very well and some don't. I can't predict who will and who won't based on their degree. The reason ADN nurses have a much better chance (well the only chance really as new grad BSNs are not hired at all) of being hired into the Critical Care Nurse Residency program is because they don't run off to CRNA school as soon as they get the required ICU experience. My residency class for the SICU had 9 people in it. Only one (me) was an ADN. Of the 8 who had BSNs 7 went to CRNA school and one became a stay at home mom. Subsequent classes where similar. Many of them did not even complete their two contract we signed to get into the residency program. Our manager and preceptors ( I am one now) got tired of spending vast amounts of time and money training new grads only to have them run off to CRNA school as soon as they could. There is nothing written but no BSN grads have been hired in the last two classes.
    GadgetRN71 likes this.


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