Are all nurses that wear white dorks?

  1. i just wondered what your perspective on this trend is; i mean here it is that we have stirred away from this trend with diverse patterns and pastels. so, are you a dork? i count myself as one...just want to know that if someone's fluids ends up on me what particular color it is!!??? :trout:
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  2. 62 Comments

  3. by   MsLady06
    White is not a dorky color. I think it looks professional. I also like the powder blue or the green. i hate to see nurses coming in wearing ALL BLACK...ugh it can be scary for the patients. I think all nurses should stick to the brighter colors. As far as cartoon patterns... Yes some of them look cute I preferably wear them on certain occasions..holidays or according to seasons. I hope it never goes back to nurses having to wear 100% white on the job.
  4. by   Katnip
    I'm not sure how a nurse who wears all white equates with being a dork. It's a matter of personal preference.
  5. by   P_RN
    The that wearing all white is dorky isn't exactly :deadhorse but more like ROFLMAO x 3:roll :roll :roll


    Nurses wear clean clothes. Nurses wear comfortable clothes. Nurses have to comply with the "suits" because the "suits" have us under their spell. OooooooohhhhooooooohhhhhoooooooOO!
  6. by   UKRNinUSA
    when I was pregnant with my second kid I got no end of teasing about my all-white maternity scrubs - "here comes the student" etc. However they were kind enough not to say" here comes the great white beached whale"!
    Black scrubs induce thoughts of autopsies, funeral directors etc
    Cartooned scrubs -ugh -I would rather wear white than a cartoon scrub top - can you say UNPROFESSIONAL? how about DEGRADING? INFANTILE?
  7. by   Goodoldnurse
    I think "whites" send the message "I am a professional, a Registered Nurse." Many patients have no idea who their nurse is! So many other departments wear scrubs or white jackets. I think white should be reserved for RNs and Drs. Colored scrubs can be fun, but many at some of the hospitals I go to with my students take it too far, and some are wrinkled and worn out. As we work toward becoming and being a respected profession, we may want to dress the part. :innerconf
    Just an thought!
  8. by   GardenDove
    I personally don't make judgements of nurses based on their dress. No one at my facility wears all white, but if they did I wouldn't care.
  9. by   athena55
    Hello All:
    I kind of agree with the above posters. I work at the VA (VISN3) and the uniform of the day is....white pants, any color scrub top. I myself don't much go for the cartoon-style tops, especially if one if working critical care, and I tend to wear solid color scrub tops.
    I think white is culturally more accepting as the professional RN color. Must North Americans associate white with being an RN or "the Nurse"
    Not sure about the Dork part, though. .
    If I may, at this point, express one of my "pet peeves"? When nursing professionals either refuse to wear their ID tags, or wear them turned around, so you can't see their name, title etc.
    Y'all take care, have a safe, healthy New Year 2007
    Respectfully,
    athena
  10. by   loquacity
    personally i think the nurses in all white looks scarier to patients than the ones wearing all black (plus in some asian cultures the "colour of death" is white, not black...so we can't be using those excuses when we live in countries with such diverse ethnic backgrounds). I think the all black scrubs can look very proffesional...
    I think the all white looks very institutional....and if your hospitalized you don't need to be reminded more than you already are that you are in a big scary hospital, possible with the nurses that look so old school that it freaks you out....
    but i figure if people want to wear white feel free to do so....
    (PS. i used to work in a bakery when i was younger...all white once again but more practical considering there was flour EVERYWHERE...but unless im mistaken blood, feces, vomit and simialr substances are rarely pure white thus you see them on scrubs...(unless it was some sort of very white purulent discharge...which just what i want to ahve spilled on my uniform)..but one tip for white scrub wearers don't wear eg. bright red, black etc underwear if your pants arn't thick enough to conceal it...now that looks funny lol. (and in a hospital setting probably unproffesional)...oh and with whites after a point fabric seems to get thinner with age and there coems a point that is just plain see through no matter what you do period...chuck thm!
    Last edit by loquacity on Dec 30, '06
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Wearing white doesn't make a nurse the slang term for 'penis.'
  12. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from Goodoldnurse
    I think "whites" send the message "I am a professional, a Registered Nurse." Many patients have no idea who their nurse is! So many other departments wear scrubs or white jackets. I think white should be reserved for RNs and Drs.
    I'm an LPN and I wear white.

    And I'm probably a dork.
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    I just asked my 23 y.o. son "Have you ever heard that dork is slang for penis?". He said "Yeah, it means a whale's penis".

    Ya learn somethin new everyday. I always thought "Dork" meant "nerd" or "goofy".

    As to white being equated with "dork" . . . depending on your definition, I'd say no, either way.

    I don't like all white personally. I do wear black "Dickie" brand flared scrub pants . . . (oh dear, another slang term for penis) . . . . :spin:

    steph
  14. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from UKRNinUSA
    when I was pregnant with my second kid I got no end of teasing about my all-white maternity scrubs - "here comes the student" etc. However they were kind enough not to say" here comes the great white beached whale"!
    Black scrubs induce thoughts of autopsies, funeral directors etc
    Cartooned scrubs -ugh -I would rather wear white than a cartoon scrub top - can you say UNPROFESSIONAL? how about DEGRADING? INFANTILE?

    Can YOU say PEDIATRICS? How about COMFORTING TO CHILDREN? After all, that IS what those kinds of scrubs were made for.

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