ANGRY! There's no place to eat or drink 'round here! - page 4

My hospital has addopted a policy of No iota of food at or near one's work station. The rule is that all of your drinks (including bottled water) and all of any snacks are to be held in the lounge... Read More

  1. by   smk1
    I have to have a snack. Even if it means wolfing down a balance bar on the run. Anyone want to deal with a nursing student that passed out in the hallway? Because that is exactly what could happen.
  2. by   wooh
    OSHA demands a closed container. It's JCAHO that demands no food/drink at all (like most irrational demands, it's JCAHO.) The only way the germs that are capable of jumping out of the closed and bagged cup of pee onto the counter and back onto my drink and through the lid are going to make me sick, is if my immune system is depleted from lack of regular nourishment!

    What kills me, is that I can't have my drink in the nurse's station, because it's a "patient care area" but we have to store BREAST MILK (body fluid!!!) in our staff refrigerator. So I've got body fluids right next to my lunch.
  3. by   bagladyrn
    Your best bet if the "PTB's" are "going by the book" is to hand a little of that right back. If every shift, especially at night, multiple nurses on several units call the house supervisor to relieve them for every break they are supposed to have - "Sorry, my coworkers are all maxed out and can't watch mine too, and I want to be sure that I take my break in the appropriate place", then I'm betting that some slack will eventually be cut or a closer spot will be designated.
    Now I know that you won't really get those breaks you are calling for, but the lack of such will be documented for filing a complaint, and the supervisor will likely be pushing for a solution just from the time consumed to answer all those calls.
  4. by   loricatus
    I was floating today and we had a JCAHO visit. One of the inspectors put his coffee down by the sink to wash his hands, I flew in and dumped that coffee in the trash, pretending not to know who that person was at the sink & ran away as fast as I could. I just couldn't help it since I was dying of thirst and he had the nerve to be walking around with a container of coffee. Don't think he ever found out who did it & I really don't care if I get in trouble for it. You should have seen all the ***kissing they were getting from management-I was getting quite sick watching it.
    Last edit by loricatus on Sep 19, '07 : Reason: redundancy
  5. by   wooh
    [evil]
    Quote from loricatus
    we had a JCAHO visit. One of the inspectors put his coffee down by the sink to wash his hands, I flew in and dumped that coffee in the trash, pretending not to know who that person was at the sink & ran away as fast as I could.
    [/evil]
    Bwahaha! I love it!!!
  6. by   tddowney
    Quote from TeleRNer
    My hospital has addopted a policy of No iota of food at or near one's work station. The rule is that all of your drinks (including bottled water) and all of any snacks are to be held in the lounge and never ever be near your area of work. Not even an innocent package of gum!

    I agreee, having food in the hallway on counters left behind by staff from the last shift is troublesome and a nuissance when you have to spend time cleaning up other's messes. However, when the lounge is located 1/2 a football field's length from your patient's rooms, it's really quite inhumane to ask anyone to chase back and forth after an energy drink and take care of 5 patients all at the same time.

    So that's basically my gripe! Not being allowed to have food or drink near your area of work!

    I'll admit I've been known to hide my coffee now and then!

    If they are going to enforce this policy, then you and your fellow nurses need to enforce the rules about luch and breaks.

    Take this opportunity to let your supervisors know that you will require, for your safety and good patient care, regular breaks and lunch periods, and offer to help plan and implement a schedule, who will cover during busy times, etc.

    This way, you aren't violating any policies that could get you in trouble by sneaking, and you are letting the hospital know that you expect them to follow the rules as well. You're not being obstinate, but assertive and cooperative in helping set a schedule.
  7. by   suanna
    This is not just a hospital poicy its a Joint Commission rule -no food or drink in the patient care area, (no food or drink at or around patient records may also be included but I'm not sure about this). As with all the J.C. rules it makes little sense but hospitals must complyif the want accredited.
  8. by   tddowney
    Quote from CRNI-ICU20
    don'tcha just love it when people who have not worked at the bedside ever or in years get to make the rules for those of us who do???
    crni

    All bureaucracies come to serve their own interests first, and one way to do that is to make silly rules, in addition to the ones that make sense. More rules require more people to enforce them, and thus bigger empires for the bureaucrats, job security for the field enforcers, etc. 99% of would evolve the same way if we were in similar jobs.

    If I was king (God help us all if that comes to pass:spin I'd shut every agency every 5-10 years, and start 'em all over, and make sure that none of the same people work at the new one.
  9. by   tddowney
    Quote from mjlrn97

    To say that I was embarrassed by my behavior is an understatement, but I had NO control over it. I didn't pass out, but someone ran and got me a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and some milk, and after they took effect I apologized to everyone and resumed my appointed rounds. Of course, I was called on the carpet and my rear end handed to me for my 'unprofessional' actions, but afterwards I noticed that the 'suits' sort of looked the other way when the occasional granola bar or soda bottle would find its way into the report room............:uhoh21:

    Now, at my assisted living facility I don't allow anything in the med room or hallways except for a covered drink (travel mug or bottle with a lid), but I encourage the staff to take short snack and hydration breaks throughout the day whenever possible. It's only common sense........which is, I fear, what JCAHO and other similar organizations lack. They've been away from 'the floors' so long they have no idea of what the average nurse deals with in an average shift. 'Tis a shame they have so much power over us.

    I don't mean to pick on you, but............................Why in the world did you apologize?

    This wasn't your lack of professionalism, but lack of professionalism by your supervisors and management. Management is a profession, and it should be held to standards of conduct as well.

    I'm glad you have a better situation now, and your treatment of your nurses is just what our profession needs.
  10. by   UM Review RN
    I like those new little half-pint water bottles that they have out now. They just fit into a cargo pants pocket. Probably could slide a granola bar in there too.

    http://www.aviatorscrubs.com/aviator...=Aviator-Pants
  11. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from tddowney
    I don't mean to pick on you, but............................Why in the world did you apologize?

    This wasn't your lack of professionalism, but lack of professionalism by your supervisors and management. Management is a profession, and it should be held to standards of conduct as well.

    I'm glad you have a better situation now, and your treatment of your nurses is just what our profession needs.

    I can get away with treating my staff like human beings only because I work in a small assisted living facility that isn't subject to JCAHO's 'majoring in the minors' way of doing things.

    As for the apology: I was embarrassed about my out-of-control behavior in front of the patient..........not to mention the ER nurse I yelled at, the patient in the other bed, and no doubt the patients five rooms down the hall in either direction! And of course, if I hadn't apologized, my AD would certainly have made sure I lived to regret it.

    It's funny how the passage of time and getting away from the situation can change one's take on things---it's been several years since that incident, I no longer work at that hospital, and I'm on the other side of the desk now as a manager myself. And I find that I spend a lot of time walking a tightrope at work, trying to keep the right balance between being a boss and being able to put myself in the worker's shoes. There are times I have to enforce rules that I think are wrong---drug testing comes to mind here---and times I have to stand with the company against something the staff wants, even though in my heart I agree with them.

    So I know a little more about the management perspective.........you've heard the expression "It's lonely at the top"? Well, it isn't as easy as it looks, and contrary to popular belief, nurse-managers do NOT sit behind a desk thinking up busywork for staff to do. We're too busy trying to keep our own butts out of a sling.
  12. by   NursShar1
    The Joint Commission says that you cannot eat or drink in patient care areas. I have a simple suggestion for management.... consider the nursing desks NON patient care areas and ban personnel from taking labs or any other patient care items to the desk. We have alcohol on every wall to rub our hands with - do they think our hands are any more clean when we go the 1/2 a football field to eat in the break room than if we snack right there at the desk? In the words of Carlos Mencia, "duh-duh-duhhhh".

    I have an insulated cooler bag the size of a small tote bag. I have to eat every 2-4 hours (just snacks - fruit, yogurt, peanut butter and celery) or I get the jitters. I also have to stay hydrated. I work in a busy children's ER and would NEVER get into the break room, even to pee! I just keep that tote bag with me at the station and sneak into it when I need a snack. If I take some food out of the bag, I walk down the hall while eating it - that is not a patient care area, haha!

    The US government food pyramid even recommends 6 small meals a day now. When we work nights, typically for me I get one meal before work. The other 5 usually have to take place at work. We need to start standing up for our right to be nourished and hydrated in order to give effective patient care!
  13. by   DLO, BSN, RN
    My place of work claims it's a JHACO rule that no food and drinks are in the food area, yet I see it at other hospitals.

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