Am I going to lose my license?

  1. 0 I am a new cna and I have a question. I was in orientation (following another cna around) and I quit in the middle of my shift, is that abandonment? Keep in mind abandonment is when you leave and no one is taking care of your patients. I didn't have any patients, I was only following. Anyone please help.
  2. Visit  unlucky_monkey888 profile page

    About unlucky_monkey888

    Joined Apr '08; Posts: 1.

    18 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  pepperann35 profile page
    0
    Quote from unlucky_monkey888
    I am a new cna and I have a question. I was in orientation (following another cna around) and I quit in the middle of my shift, is that abandonment? Keep in mind abandonment is when you leave and no one is taking care of your patients. I didn't have any patients, I was only following. Anyone please help.
    No, you should not lose your license, but I wonder what happened to cause you to walk out? I would really like to know. Take Care
  4. Visit  elkpark profile page
    0
    Welcome to allnurses! I hope you'll find the site useful and interesting.

    If you were not actually responsible, yourself, for any clients, I don't see how it could be considered abandonment, but it was extremely unprofessional behavior. I'm sure you realize that you will get bad references from that employer in the future -- and don't think that simply leaving that employer off a resum and employment applications means that no one else can find out that you worked for them ...
  5. Visit  pebbles profile page
    0
    Isn't it the RN who is legally responsible for the patients and patient care, and not CNA's who are assistive personnel???

    Either way, you should probably contact your licensing body about this type of question, as it may depend on where you live and the terms of your specific license.
  6. Visit  Wendy_RN profile page
    0
    Quote from pebbles
    Isn't it the RN who is legally responsible for the patients and patient care, and not CNA's who are assistive personnel???

    Either way, you should probably contact your licensing body about this type of question, as it may depend on where you live and the terms of your specific license.
    Yes, the RN is ultimately responsible for the patient. If something goes wrong due to lack of care from the CNA the BON will go after the RN.

    As far as abandonment, that would not apply in this case because you were in orientation and shadowing someone. It was not the professional way of handling things though.

    As far as losing your license, CNAs are not licensed. They have a certification, but not a license.
  7. Visit  SuesquatchRN profile page
    1
    Quote from Wendy_RN
    Yes, the RN is ultimately responsible for the patient. If something goes wrong due to lack of care from the CNA the BON will go after the RN.

    As far as abandonment, that would not apply in this case because you were in orientation and shadowing someone. It was not the professional way of handling things though.

    As far as losing your license, CNAs are not licensed. They have a certification, but not a license.
    Depends. NYS certifies, VT licenses.
    Wendy_RN likes this.
  8. Visit  Wendy_RN profile page
    1
    Quote from Suesquatch
    Depends. NYS certifies, VT licenses.

    I did not know that some states license. I learned something new. Thanks for the info.
    SuesquatchRN likes this.
  9. Visit  Jolie profile page
    18
    I hope I don't get flamed for being too harsh, but here goes: This is the second post in as many days by a CNA who walked off or was a no call/no show during the first few days of employment.

    While I don't believe abandonment is an issue with either poster, I don't understand the actions of newly-employed CNAs who simply "disappear" without the minimal professional courtesy of a verbal resignation to the person in charge.

    I can't fathom working conditions so poor that I would leave in the middle of a shift without notice. I understand giving notice and not going back, but I don't understand walking off mid-day.

    I don't think that some people take the time to consider the possible ramifications to future employment, school plans, etc. when they behave in such an unprofessional manner.
    Becca608, Plagueis, WarEagle4Life, and 15 others like this.
  10. Visit  paacollins profile page
    0
    I have to agree with Jolie. Even if working conditions are intolerable, at least give a verbal or written notice that you are leaving. Walking off with no explanation will likely come back to bite you when you apply for a future job. If your future employer were to contact your former employer, most likely what the former will say is "the employee left the job without notice." I highly doubt any mention will be made of WHAT caused you to do so. You have to always think of the future, because, even though hindsight is 20/20, we can't change the past; we can only shape the future based on what we do today.

    PS Keep looking until you find someplace you are happy. I worked PRN as a CNA for a year while doing my prereqs for nursing school. I had a lot of days I wanted to walk out and eventually did quit the job. Since then, I've seen a lot of places I think I would have been happy working in.
  11. Visit  wonderbee profile page
    0
    While on orientation, I don't see the need for an aide to give notice since they are not not considered in staffing anyway. At least finish out the shift though. It's so unprofessional to just up and leave like that.

    I'd really rather not waste another minute in orienting someone who is going to leave as soon as it's over, be it UAP or a nurse. Get someone else in there who can be counted in staffing ASAP.
  12. Visit  VivaLasViejas profile page
    9
    From a manager's perspective:

    This may sound harsh, but there are many good reasons why the OP was wrong to do what she did.

    It may not legally be considered abandonment to disappear without notice in the middle of one's first day of orientation, but it IS certainly unprofessional, and it speaks volumes about one's character (or lack thereof). In fact, under certain circumstances I would probably report such an act to the BON from which the CNA received her/his certification, because a) it helps to establish a paper trail in case this is not an isolated incident, and b) I wouldn't want other facilities to waste THEIR time in interviewing, hiring, and training such an individual. All of this costs a good deal of time and money on the part of the employer, and every time someone pulls a stunt like this, that's time and money we aren't spending on our current staff (not to mention the residents!)

    At the very least, the OP should have spoken to the person in charge of orientation and then written a short note of explanation to the DNS/DON as to the reasons for resigning so quickly. Certainly I wouldn't expect a CNA to remain in a job where s/he can tell right off the bat that it's not a good facility to work for, but then s/he should have done some homework before applying in the first place. It is cowardly and childish to simply walk out without telling anyone. :stone
    Plagueis, WarEagle4Life, sharlynn, and 6 others like this.
  13. Visit  november17 profile page
    1
    With all this stuff about health care careers being on the up-and-up, unfortunately it will continue to attract people that aren't cut out for the job.
    casi likes this.
  14. Visit  VivaLasViejas profile page
    0
    Too true!


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