Air in the IV line.....

  1. 0 How much is too much? Is any air in the IV line safe? How do you get every bit of air out? Nurses seem to differ on this and it freaks me out.
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  3. Visit  nomadnurse} profile page

    About nomadnurse

    Joined Apr '06; Posts: 1.

    10 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  sirI} profile page
    0
    hello, nomadnurse and welcome to allnurses.com

    check out this thread started recently on the same topic:

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f8/air-e...hlight=embolus

    enjoy the site!
  5. Visit  longjourneydream} profile page
    0
    I was taught in nursing school that peripherial lines put on an IV pumps is safe(will go not further if too much air in line), a little air that is left in line is not going to make a difference.

    If you talk about a central line like with a double or triple lumen, then we taught to make sure all air is out of the line before connecting and starting a pump!

    If anyone has any more info on this please let me know.

    Carol Weeks RN / ER





    Quote from nomadnurse
    How much is too much? Is any air in the IV line safe? How do you get every bit of air out? Nurses seem to differ on this and it freaks me out.
  6. Visit  para82frame} profile page
    0
    can't air in the blood cause an enbolisom?
  7. Visit  longjourneydream} profile page
    0
    I have been taught that yes, air can cause an embolism, but it has to be quite a bit of air in a peripherial line.
    The real concern is the central line. Check the line to make sure it is well primed with no visable bubbles or air pockets, before connecting.

    I'm just wondering has there been anyone that has had that problem, with their patient having an emboli from air in IV?

    Nobody I know has mentioned any problem in my 17 yrs in healthcare...

    CW




    Quote from para82frame
    can't air in the blood cause an enbolisom?
  8. Visit  kristen929} profile page
    0
    I've been told that it would take the whole IV tubing full of air (might have been slightly exxagerated...I'm sure half would do the trick) to cause an emboli. A few little bubbles here and there get filtered out.
  9. Visit  Fiona59} profile page
    0
    I've heard that it takes roughly the entire line on an IVAC to cause a problem.

    I know that in Dialysis, it was always a potential issue on return. We were all advised to stop the line if we had an air warning, trendelenburg and have the patient lie on their left so that the right side of the heart was at the greatest hight.

    Other than that, nothing to add.
  10. Visit  time4meRN} profile page
    0
    Depends on the line. Peripheral slow running lines with a little air won't hurt. A central line with a little air may have some potential depending on the pt. A swan with a ruptured balloon is the same. An a line should never have air. Rapid transfuser should have little or no air, because it is going so fast it's easy to have more air then what you think, so I always tell nurses to burp and clear all lines well.
  11. Visit  crissrn27} profile page
    0
    We have a doc that wants every...single...bubble out of the line. Uggggg......I do work in the nursery, so our pts are tiny, but the micro bubble in a peripheral IV are not gonna give them an embolism!

    The other pedis say it would take upwards of 10cc of air to actually cause an emboli in a 3lbs baby.
  12. Visit  MadisonsMomRN} profile page
    0
    Quote from Fiona59
    I've heard that it takes roughly the entire line on an IVAC to cause a problem.
    Ive heard the same thing... but wouldnt try it!
  13. Visit  Daytonite} profile page
    0
    guys! this was more recently thoroughly discussed on this thread:
    Last edit by Daytonite on Jul 25, '07


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