Action plan

  1. At the place in which I work the director has started a new disciplinary method for nurses who have been reported for some wrongdoing regardless of whether it is against policy or a complaint from a fellow staff member. She makes them come up with an "action plan". From what I understand this is a long essay where references are required and there are roman numerals and subgroups a,b,c and the "goals" are written in by the director.
    I was shocked when I heard about this. I understand the point is to think about what was done and how to correct it, but this seems extremely punitive, humiliating and time consuming. If it's not done to their satisfaction the nurse has to revise it. One nurse had to do it 5 times before it was accepted.
    Has anyone else heard of this or experienced this where they work?
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   NurseCard
    Nope.

    If it were repetitive "wrongdoings" by one person, than I can understand an
    "action plan", and I unfortunately have been in that situation. However,
    everything was kept pretty much confidential, between myself and my
    managers.

    When you say "references" what do you mean?

    The whole thing sounds pretty over the top and ridiculous to me.
  4. by   TriciaJ
    Have to revise it or what? What happens if you just refuse to do it altogether? This seems like a great way to pit people against each other. Someone rubs you the wrong way you just drop a dime to the manager and bingo! That person gets a humiliating, time-consuming project. When do you do this action plan? Do you get relieved from patient care duties for this purpose? Please tell me you aren't expected to do it on your own time.

    I won't even bother asking if you have a union. If you did, they would promptly put a stop to this crap. This, folks, is the definition of bullying. Someone in power creates onerous tasks for people to do to protect their jobs. It would be lovely if you and your coworkers got together and told the manager as a group that you will not be participating in this stupidity.
  5. by   seb1957
    I also wondered what would happen if they refused to do it. I think I would. So far the 3 people I know who received an action plan have not refused and its a fairly new thing.I imagine they would not get a raise at the least. And when they do it is up to them. There's no time during work so they have to do it off the clock. Our manager has been referred to as a bully by a few people. I wish the staff was brave enough to stand up to her, but I doubt they would. Everyone doesn't even know this policy exists yet. I only found out about it through the people experiencing it.
  6. by   seb1957
    By references I mean books, articles, etc.
    It is kept confidential by the managers. It is the people who it happened to that spoke up on a personal basis to the workers they felt safe with.
    It is very "over the top" as you say and the interesting thing is that they are having personal 1 on 1 meetings with staff every 6 months asking what they can do to retain nurses!
  7. by   Union-Jack
    Quote from seb1957
    I also wondered what would happen if they refused to do it. I think I would. So far the 3 people I know who received an action plan have not refused and its a fairly new thing.I imagine they would not get a raise at the least. And when they do it is up to them. There's no time during work so they have to do it off the clock. Our manager has been referred to as a bully by a few people. I wish the staff was brave enough to stand up to her, but I doubt they would. Everyone doesn't even know this policy exists yet. I only found out about it through the people experiencing it.
    I would likely refuse, especially if I did not agree with the reason behind it. I refused to sign an annual review once because the manager was just making stuff up because he was a poo-poo head.
  8. by   Julius Seizure
    I'd either be sitting there after shift change doing it before clocking out and leaving the hospital, or be submitting my extra hours worked from home to HR. I am an hourly employee. I get paid hourly for work-related activities.

    As for the references, I still don't get what they want. I mean, I get what you are saying, but it just seems weird. Then again, the whole thing does.

    I, too, am curious what happens if you refuse.
  9. by   Here.I.Stand
    Here's a reference for them (admittedly not APA, but hey):

    Fact Sheet - Wage and Hour Division (WHD) - U.S. Department of Labor

    All productive, mandatory off-shift activity is PAID.
  10. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from seb1957
    At the place in which I work the director has started a new disciplinary method for nurses who have been reported for some wrongdoing regardless of whether it is against policy or a complaint from a fellow staff member. She makes them come up with an "action plan". From what I understand this is a long essay where references are required and there are roman numerals and subgroups a,b,c and the "goals" are written in by the director.
    I was shocked when I heard about this. I understand the point is to think about what was done and how to correct it, but this seems extremely punitive, humiliating and time consuming. If it's not done to their satisfaction the nurse has to revise it. One nurse had to do it 5 times before it was accepted.
    Has anyone else heard of this or experienced this where they work?
    A knew a nurse who had to write a long essay, then have other nurses read it and sign saying that they'd done so. It was a trade off for not being fired after cursing at a patient.
    I guess I could see a "plan of action" requirement for employees trying to save themselves (with one foot already in the grave). It doesn't make sense for minor transgressions, though.
  11. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    I'd tell them to pound sand.
  12. by   Here.I.Stand
    As Sour Lemon said, I can see for major transgressions... although thinking back to when fellow employees were put on a PIP seems like the meetings happened during work.

    But for "a complaint?" As in, a CNA complained that I didn't help her enough, or a family member complaining that I didn't get their LTACH-on-Monday son up into a chair....as my other pt was coding? (Both true stories) Heck no.
  13. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Sour Lemon
    A knew a nurse who had to write a long essay, then have other nurses read it and sign saying that they'd done so. It was a trade off for not being fired after cursing at a patient.
    What was the essay on and what was the purpose of having to ask her coworkers to read it?

    Or was the trade-off literally humiliate yourself or be fired?
  14. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Julius Seizure
    What was the essay on and what was the purpose of having to ask her coworkers to read it?

    Or was the trade-off literally humiliate yourself or be fired?
    I forget the topic ...but as soon as she showed it to me and asked me to sign, I asked her if she had to write it in exchange for not being fired. She confirmed, and we all had a good laugh. She really did deserve to be fired, although I liked the girl and can certainly understand why she lost it with the involved patient.

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