A Lesson Learned - page 4

Again, there is another thread started- which could be interpreted by some as passive-aggressive remarks about advanced degree nurses, and it could not. I read it and felt slightly insulted, and I... Read More

  1. by   Q.
    Originally posted by mario_ragucci
    Also, your educational degrees are only tests of your short-term memory. Your working and long-term memory is not really able to be put through the test. Some whipper-snapper CNA, LPN or RN, with a working memory like an optical disk drive, may listen to you and assess your "abilities"

    Let people tear you down, if your foundation is weak. :kiss
    Ahhh yes they are. However, knowing that is what makes me strive for more. I noticed an immediate difference in a BSN program compared to a MSN program. My BSN program fed me facts and figures, which I memorized and regurgitated back, either in tests or papers. My MSN program assists me in taking that information and actually reflecting on it, putting it into practice, and using the information to build my own ideas and theories. We are graded more so on original thought than we are repeating of facts.

    Looking back, I realize all there is that I don't know and wasn't taught to me in the BSN program, simply because there isn't any time to include it all. There is sooo much information that is yet to be learned about nursing. Every post of RNCountry's informs me, educates me, astounds me. But yet, some people on this board would like to think that I would dismiss her because she has a lesser degree than me. I don't - and that is obvious.

    Because I defend my knowledge, because I refuse to be categorized, and because I feel a BSN is invaluable, and because I believe a Bachelor's only preps you for what you can learn in graduate school, I think some people take offense in that.

    These are my ideas and my opinions. Bachelor's is so named because it signifies the beginning of one's education. The beginning. I firmly believe this. Some people don't, but hey, don't knock me for it.
  2. by   lever5
    I have learned to keep my mouth shut about BSN, CCRN. Every hospital I go to, I hear a conversation about how a C student is worth 5 A students. I do not know why people choose to feel an A student makes a bad nurse. But you can believe this A student is smart enough not to open herself up to being judged a poor nurse for achieving A's.
  3. by   boggle
    Nurses don't need to cite their credentials to the world to prove they are valueable and valued. Our behavior proves that to patients, families, fellow workers, employers, and communities and to ourselves every day.

    But once we assume the title "nurse", I feel we also assume the responsibility to continuously learn and grow in our field. Further education is vital to survive and to be safe.

    So keep striving. Keep learning. Look for deeper understanding. Learn how to better advocate for yourself, your patients and your co-workers. If this education leads you from an LPN to an RN and on and on great. You will have one more "measureable" index of value to others.

    Make a difference!
  4. by   Q.
    Originally posted by lever5
    I have learned to keep my mouth shut about BSN, CCRN. Every hospital I go to, I hear a conversation about how a C student is worth 5 A students. I do not know why people choose to feel an A student makes a bad nurse. But you can believe this A student is smart enough not to open herself up to being judged a poor nurse for achieving A's.
    And that is the saddest of all.

    Ok, you guys, THIS is why I started this thread. THIS is what I want to stop. An A student does NOT, and let me repeat, does NOTequal a bad nurse.

    A BSN does NOT equal a bad nurse.
    A "young" nurse does NOT equal a bad nurse.
    A nurse who doesn't work at the bedside is NOT a bad nurse.

    People's attitudes, egoes and insecurities equal a mean person, ie an LPN who looks down upon another LPN simply because she is 15 years younger than her, or, an LPN who frowns upon the RN simply because her schooling was different, or, an RN who dismisses the BSN as "book smart" because the last BSN she worked with was slow to pick up the pace on the floor.
    Tell me, then, would it be acceptable for me to say that all black people are theives, because I got robbed by ONE? HELL NO.

    So, let's cut with the stereotypes about RNs and about BSNs. There are some of us, myself included, who feel that an already excellent nurse would be even more excellent with a BSN. I am not bad for that. There is absolutely, positively, nothing wrong with further education. So let's stop making us, (actually ME) feel like we made the wrong choice at obtaining the BSN, or worse yet, the wrong choice in PROFESSIONS.
  5. by   Furball
    Originally posted by lever5
    I have learned to keep my mouth shut about BSN, CCRN. Every hospital I go to, I hear a conversation about how a C student is worth 5 A students. I do not know why people choose to feel an A student makes a bad nurse. But you can believe this A student is smart enough not to open herself up to being judged a poor nurse for achieving A's.

    That's an odd opinion to have. How in Gods' name can someone who coasts along with a "C" be sooo much better than the hard working "A" student? I don't get it. That's downright nuts! All of my evals from both hospitals I work at are glowing postive. Guess I'd better not let them know I graduated summa cum laude and have plans to return for BSN. CCRN is on my list of things to do also. Wow.....I MUST be a demon huh? lol

    Lever...is this a southern thing?
  6. by   Q.
    Furball,

    People have that opinion because they believe that A students only memorized facts and never learned to "apply" them.
    People think 4.0 students lack common-sense and are only "book smart." Take the books away and they are lost.

    I know, it's a crappy opinion to hold. Usually, and it has been my experience, that those people who hold that opinion barely passed themselves. And usually those who did get a 4.0 can see the difference in themselves and those who are truly "book smart" only - and they also learn not to make blanket statements like that.
  7. by   mattsmom81
    Originally posted by tapper
    To anyone who does not appreciate a cynical view of this thread . . . please stop reading . . . now.
    Susi, I can hear the frustration in your voice/words . . . but I believe you should be far less concerned about how others percieve you or your accomplishments and concentrate on what is obviously your passion in life, nursing.
    This deserves to be quoted!

    If we truly feel good about ourselves (intrinsic pride)
    we don't need to flaunt ourselves and seek outside approval......thank you Tapper!
  8. by   SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    ...Happy Easter! I hope everyone had a spiritually reflective & peaceful day...as much as possible for those who had to work or aren't here due to the war. I hope everyone got a chance to spend this joyous day/evening with their love ones & friends for as we all know from September 11th, life is too short. I just wanted to share my thought & wishes with all of my fellow nursing colleagues and new found friends here at All Nurses.com BB; I do think about, respect, & appreciate you all very much.:kiss :chuckle:roll:blushkiss

    Sincerely - Moe
  9. by   SICU Queen
    I have a question. Like I mentioned in a previous post, I don't give a hoot about a nurse's initials, as long as the effort is there and I have some decent knowledgeable backup in a crisis.

    For those BSNs pursuing a Master's: Exactly how much clinical experience do you feel you should have before you are allowed to become a nursing instructor? My husband is in his third clinical semester of an ADN program. He has been an LPN for 14 years, and spent half of that in the military working in ICU. He is VERY experienced. One of his first semester instructors spent ONE year working in a DOCTOR'S OFFICE before obtaining her MSN and becoming an instructor.

    While I appreciate and respect her book knowledge, how the hell can she teach a student ANYTHING about bedside nursing? She's NEVER DONE IT.
  10. by   JillR
    Suzy,

    I have read your posts about higher degrees and can not disagree with your views. It just seems to me that you use alot of energy continuously debating this issue. You have nothing to prove to anyone else and you have every right to be proud of your accomplishments.

    I have this belief that those that put down entry levels other than the one that they have are insecure and we cannot change this by debating it over and over on a bulletin board. This is why I will read these posts, but a rarely respond to the posts such and the ones that are titled like they are just looking for an argument.

    I am an ADN nurse and I do not disrespect BSN nurses. I wish I would have had the time and resourses to pursue that avenue, but I do not feel like my education was in any way inferior to others in regards to bedside nursing. I work in a very small rural hospital and am the night charge nurse only because I have more acute care experience then the other nurses there and one is a BSN. She does not act superior, she will consult me about the care of her patients, and I will consult her about mine and about issues pertaining to how to handle other employees. She has the educational backgroud and management experience that I lack and I know this, she is a great resource. So, I look at this relationship as a team effort, we each have knowledge that is crucial to the way our patients are taken care of and we all pitch in when needed.

    I hate all of these generalzations about others. This does more to create problems between different levels of education than anything. Everyone deserves a chance reagardless of thier educational background, lets base our assessment of others on individual merits, not on a bad experience we had with an individual that happened to have a BSN, ADN, LPN or diploma. That just makes no sense.

    I hear more LPN's state that RN's say this and say that about LPN's than I have heard RN's state these kind of things. In fact, I have never heard RN's state most of the things that I have heard LPN's say they do. So, when these threads come up, I tend to take it with a grain of salt. Sometimes you just have to consider the source.
  11. by   SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    Originally posted by SICU Queen
    I have a question. Like I mentioned in a previous post, I don't give a hoot about a nurse's initials, as long as the effort is there and I have some decent knowledgeable backup in a crisis.

    For those BSNs pursuing a Master's: Exactly how much clinical experience do you feel you should have before you are allowed to become a nursing instructor? My husband is in his third clinical semester of an ADN program. He has been an LPN for 14 years, and spent half of that in the military working in ICU. He is VERY experienced. One of his first semester instructors spent ONE year working in a DOCTOR'S OFFICE before obtaining her MSN and becoming an instructor.

    While I appreciate and respect her book knowledge, how the hell can she teach a student ANYTHING about bedside nursing? She's NEVER DONE IT.
    ...leaves me to wonder too...very interesting question.
  12. by   joyrochelle
    One of his first semester instructors spent ONE year working in a DOCTOR'S OFFICE before obtaining her MSN and becoming an instructor.

    ouch...well that pinches it.


    Hey ya'll...um. my head is spinning. Perhaps cuz it seems that this is quite laurel polishing and all...there seems to be such definite striaie, still after all this has been said.
    Of course this is super frustrating...we've all experienced the countless ways that animosity may rear it's head in the workplace and clinical setting.
    It's unfortunate that individuals mar the greater population ( whether it be LPN, ADN, BSN, MSN WHATEVER).
    ANd that's just it....that's it ya'll.

    LOVE WHAT YOU DO AND DO IT THE BEST YOU CAN.

    and most of all, love yourself for what you value and what you've acheived under those strengths and desires.

    I think that until there is one type of floor nurse, this animosity and senseless comparison will never be completely alleviated.

    I myself have (ALMOST THERE) earned a degree..an ADN...a degree in nursing...and once i have begun working with my license under my belt , i will begin my work towards my MSN....and i can't qwait to have that accomplishment in my heart....blah blah...jeez...i think i am done now...
  13. by   mario_ragucci
    Wow, folks DO enjoy discussing this topic, but Billy Joel all ready covered it in his song "It's Stll Rock-n-Roll To Me"

    "Should I try to be a straight A student - If you are than you think too much."

    :-)

    and another song...

    "Maybe by being an A student I can win your Love for me"
    What a wonderful world this would be

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