2 week notice...legally obligated?????

  1. I must be dumb or something..lol...but most of you have alot more experience than I do...and I would like different opionons...ok here we go ...some may know that yes, I did put in my 2 week notice in for the LTC I am working for now..so that I could satrt a new job very very soon.........I put in my 2 wk in Nov 14...which should mean I should be off the schedule by the 27th right?..ok here's the prob...the old facility still has me scheduled for 2 days after my quit date....I addressed this to my DON and she did not say anything...so STUPID QUESTION...Am I obligated to work those days?..
    I know what the answer is...but this place has a hard enuff time keeping staff...but I really want to orientate @ the new job ASAP...
    [FONT=century gothic]What's your thoughts????????????????
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  2. 24 Comments

  3. by   emily_mom
    You're not obligated to work those days. Did you make a copy of your resignation for yourself? You put in your notice and that is all your required to fill (and not even really "required"). If they are that short and wanted you to work those two extra days, they should ask you VERY NICELY if you could stay. Tell your DON that you will NOT be working those two extra days. I would also document what is said and the situation b/c it may come up in a reference issue. That way you have backup.

    Kristy (former HR specialist)

    BTW, congrats on your new job!!!
  4. by   2banurse
    Did you state the date of your resignation? That usually gives a specific date. Did they schedule for Thanksgiving? 11/28?

    I don't think they could do anything, it all depends on how this job experience went. Was it an OK job that you'll want to use for a future reference? I mean, hopefully, your new job will work out fine, but just in case it doesn't (and it does happen) you probably won't be able to use the LTC for a reference.

    Since you did give them the resignation on a Thursday (11/14), and if you didn't have a specific date, they might have thought that you will be working two full weeks, thus finishing on 11/29.

    Just my .02,

    Kris
  5. by   baseline
    As long as you stated your last day of work in your letter of resignation, you are under no obligation that I can see........
  6. by   CraftyLPN
    I never did actually state the last day...I am not sure if I would use them as a reference since I only worked there for about a month
  7. by   Youda
    Just write out a little something saying when your last day of work will be (which is different than what you are scheduled). Keep a copy, and give it to the DON. After that, it's not your problem.
  8. by   -jt
    Call the HR office (personnel office) and make sure THEY have the right date. Policy may require you to give a specific amount of notice & if you dont you may forfeit whatever unused sick time, vacation time, etc that you have accrued. If youve given the right amount of notice & HR has the right end-date on file, just tell your DON that she made a mistake on the schedule & you will not be there.

    If you have nothing accrued in the bank, & you are only working there a month, you can leave at any time, with notice or not, & just let your resume forget you ever had that job.
  9. by   Dplear
    you are not even legally obligated to work the last 2 weeks. You do not have to give any notice of quitting. You could walk in or even call in and say I quit and that is that. Not a damn thing thay can do about it. Legally they cannot even say why you left or give any details of your employment to any future employers that may contact them. All they can say is yes or no that you worked there and if you are a canidate for rehire, annd in this day and age many companies will not rehire any employee that has left for any reason for a period of several years. So even that really means nothing.

    Dave
  10. by   RoaminHankRN
    Originally posted by Dplear
    you are not even legally obligated to work the last 2 weeks. You do not have to give any notice of quitting. You could walk in or even call in and say I quit and that is that. Not a damn thing thay can do about it. Legally they cannot even say why you left or give any details of your employment to any future employers that may contact them. All they can say is yes or no that you worked there and if you are a canidate for rehire, annd in this day and age many companies will not rehire any employee that has left for any reason for a period of several years. So even that really means nothing.

    Dave
    Just be careful not to "burn your bridges." I know you mentioned you probably will not use them as a reference. You should not. But depending on where you live and if the DON "knows" people, if you leave on bad terms, it could come back to haunt you. Play it safe!

    Good Luck!
  11. by   WashYaHands
    I'll probably get flamed for this but, since you did not put a specific date on your letter of resignation, and if the schedule was already prepared prior to you giving notice(??), what harm would it do to work the extra 2 days? Will you actually be starting your new job on one of those days? This is just something to consider.

    Legally you don't have to give any notice, but professionally, it's the right thing to do.

    Linda
  12. by   RN2B2005
    My $0.02: Work the two days.
  13. by   mattsmom81
    When giving notice always add the last sentence "Tuesday the 27th night shift will by my last shift worked" to leave no doubt.

    Agree with the comments about trying hard not to burn your bridges. Even if you hated the god awful place, try not to say so or it may come back to bite you in the butt. Bosses can be quite vindictive and they DO talk to other potential bosses in the area....off the record and in whispers. Use your diplomacy to avoid peeving your boss, if possible. (I learned that one the hard way...LOL!)

    If a nurse fails to give 2 weeks notice and this is a policy violation, this could be documented as a black mark on your work record.... forever in areas that use Group One ( background check agency.)

    I guess I don't know anyone who regrets being professional in these situations.
  14. by   Gomer
    Originally posted by teddybear433183
    I never did actually state the last day...I am not sure if I would use them as a reference since I only worked there for about a month
    Then you didn't give them notice. Start back at square one with a dated (the date you submitted it) resignation notice. Include your last day (date) of work and sign it. That's how professionals do it.

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