"Just" a 2-year degree - page 8

Stopped at local pharmacy to pick up prescription. Asked pharm tech how her daughter was (she's a traveling nurse); she said great, we briefly discussed how she's deciding between staying and moving... Read More

  1. by   Kinky Slinky RN
    I chose ADN because I unfortunately do not qualify for any significant scholarships, so it's cheaper. I hate loans =) AND my stating the ADN was better was just a joke... that's why there's a wink afterwards.. it wasn't meant to be taken seriously =)
  2. by   SeanyRN
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    ty Seany!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    well-said!
    No, thankyou. Confusios say always trust moderator with sexy name.
  3. by   SeanyRN
    Quote from KiNKy sLiNkY
    I chose ADN because I unfortunately do not qualify for any significant scholarships, so it's cheaper. I hate loans =) AND my stating the ADN was better was just a joke... that's why there's a wink afterwards.. it wasn't meant to be taken seriously =)
    I dont like loans either. Lets just say I owe around the price of a fully loaded honda accord with leather, a moonroof, and 24 hr roadside assistance. I must say the ADN to BSN route is much much cheaper.

    Wait a minute......... im supposed to be mad
  4. by   rn/writer
    It took me four years to get a "two-year" degree. With six kids, general contracting building our house, and myriad other responsibilities, this was what I could manage. A four-year degree might have taken seven or eight years to achieve.

    I've thought about going back several times. The thing is, I don't want to go into federal public health or advanced practice. In the hospitals where I have worked, ADNs could be charge nurses and even move into some levels of management (although many returned to school part time once they were promoted).

    I'm happy with what I am doing now and don't foresee returning at this late date. I do, however, support and encourage anyone else who wants to.

    It DOES concern me that one viewpoint on this subject advocates making a BSN the entry level into nursing with one of the goals being to decrease the number of nurses, thereby increasing demand and raising pay. With the staffing ratios I see currently, all I can think is that workload would also have to increase and that seems to be asking for trouble.

    I'm glad this thread got back on track. Many good folks posting here.
  5. by   Tweety
    Quote from SeanyRN
    For the 100 of pms I have been getting. What I said in my post that was deleted had noooo curse words or anything like that. I just responded in a very defensive way to a nurse on this board.

    I respect ADN's, not everyone can afford or have the time to attend a 4 year program and see a 2 year as a well paying and rewarding alternative. It just gets annoying when some ADN's on the board say that and ADN program is more difficult or even compare when they have never been in a 4 year program. Im sorry if I have offended any nurses out there. I know that a degree doesnt make the person nor does it define your character. But my degree is something that I am very proud and im not afraid to show it.

    The ADN was my only option at the time I got it. It was all I could afford and the only game in town. We had no BSN programs where I lived. I had no car to commute two hours to the nearest BSN program.

    I'm now in a program to get my BSN, finally and I'm proud of that.

    I see a lot of misunderstanding going both ways. BSN nurses promoting their degree and in response ADN nurses putting down that degree. I'm now in my 12 course and have four more to go after this and get greatly offended when my degree is put down "as just a few more courses that won't make you a better nurse".

    I also get offended when it's implied that my ADN degree doesn't meet professional standards and it's implied that I'm "bringing down the profession".

    Both upset me. I think that we can be proud of our degrees, whatever they are, without offending the other degree holders.
  6. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from Tweety
    The ADN was my only option at the time I got it. It was all I could afford and the only game in town. We had no BSN programs where I lived. I had no car to commute two hours to the nearest BSN program.

    I'm now in a program to get my BSN, finally and I'm proud of that.

    I see a lot of misunderstanding going both ways. BSN nurses promoting their degree and in response ADN nurses putting down that degree. I'm now in my 12 course and have four more to go after this and get greatly offended when my degree is put down "as just a few more courses that won't make you a better nurse".

    I also get offended when it's implied that my ADN degree doesn't meet professional standards and it's implied that I'm "bringing down the profession".

    Both upset me. I think that we can be proud of our degrees, whatever they are, without offending the other degree holders.
    Boy, you've just gotta hate yourself all over the place, huh?

    I am extremely proud of my ADN. And should I go on to get my BSN (am considering it), I will be extremely proud of that. Honestly, though, the ADN was what "made" me a nurse, so I imagine I'll have to reserve a special level of self-awe for that <grin>. It was in my ADN program that clinical instructors kept us guessing at whether we'd pass muster, it was during that schooling that a mistake during skill evaluations could have me dismissed. It was that program that had me BECOME a nurse, and I will forever consider that what "did it" for me. If I get a BSN later, it will be for furtherance of education and later opportunities only, not to become a better nurse. I believe I was incredibly prepared for that already, and with more experience, I imagine I will do quite fine

    I still bristle at the idea that the nursing 2 yr degree is equivalent to a 2-yr creative arts degree. But my anger, perhaps, is misplaced: it shouldn't be at the pharm tech (even if I think she should have known better), it should be at an education system that keeps increasing entrance and graduation requirements and does not reflect that in the awarding of the degree. What was once two years, and still is someplace apparently, really does take three full time years in most places. Of course it can take a whole LOTTA years added onto that, by choice, if family and/or work lives dictate a slower pace. THAT is not the responsibility of the issuing college. But when they tack on the requirements they do, for the low credits they offer alongside, it seems a crime to consider it "just" a two-year degree. How many of you had clinicals that were "labs", meaning there was zero credit for attending, passing? How many hours did you spend in the skills lab, above and beyond what ANYONE in ANY other program had to spend studying, for no additional credit? Just seems wrong to me. But then, until our schools can grant an "in between" Associates and Bachelor's, well.....we have to deal with the "just" in front of our titles, I guess.
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from SeanyRN
    If it takes 2 years to grad a 2 year program, how long would it take for you to grad. a 4 year program?
  8. by   scaredofshots
    :bowingpur
    Quote from SeanyRN
    If it takes 2 years to grad a 2 year program, how long would it take for you to grad. a 4 year program?
    \
    OMG I know I would not like working with you girl!!!!!!!!!!!!! Mrs. Perfect
    Last edit by scaredofshots on Oct 11, '06
  9. by   angel337
    i think people are entitled to feel how they want about their career paths. i personally wanted a bachelor's degree because it was a personal accomplishment and also i did not want it to block any chances i had to advance in the future. When people think of a 2 year degree they usually think you are going for a technical or trade job. When you have a 4 year degree and up you are considered a professional by society standards. I consider all nurses professionals but unfortunately we can't expect people to understand every aspect of our career either. just recently i told someone that i went to school 5 years for my BSN and he said "Oh really, i thought nurses only went to community college for a couple of years" that offended me, because i am proud of my degree and don't want my profession minimized in any way because of the years of education you put in. doctors are respected because of the years of schooling that are required to obtain their degree. no explanation needed. nurses will never have that. just my 2 cents.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I've never been one to please 'society'.
  11. by   suzy253
    Quote from scaredofshots
    TWO YEARS? Where did you all go to school?? When I graduate with my R N I will have a total of THREE years. One year for pre req's and two years nursing... If I choose I can get another year and add the letter BS to my title...:mortarboard:
    I just graduated for a three-year program....ALL nursing for 3 long years.
    As Tweety mentioned, we had co-reqs taken along with all our nursing courses for the first couple of ye ars.
  12. by   StNeotser
    Took me 3 1/2 years to get a "2 year degree"
  13. by   boofmd
    just a 2 year degree is pretty insulting really. I recently had this debate as well in my BSN courses. "do you think BSN's are more qualified to practice nursing...Why did you return to school."
    I do not by any means think that the BSN makes you more qualified to practice nursing. We all took the same boards and passed them. We are all RN's.
    In my opinion, the ADN has more hands on clinical experience and critical thinking skills that are put to use on the floor. They are more adept to caring for the patients in emergencies because of critial thinking and reasoning that is drilled into our minds in school. I would never say I JUST have an associates because I worked my A*# off to get it.
    I've worked with many 4-year grads who have said themselves that they do not feel ready when they graduate to take on a full load. It may be the school that you go to as well. BSN programs concentrate on management type nursing where as ADN programs are hands on from the start and really crack down on knowledge and putting it to use. All that information crammed into 2 years and putting everything together in less time was more enlightening for me.

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