Why Isn't Florida a Compact State?

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    Anybody have the inside scoop as to what is holding up Florida from becoming a compact state? I've been a nurse here for 27 years and never thought about it before. Now I'd like to do some travel nursing and it would be so much easier if Fl. was compact. Does anyone know if it's ever been discussed? What would it take to get the ball rolling?:roll
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    There are many states that are not compact states, and it has not influenced my travel nursing at all. There is nothing that you can do, it is up to the board of nruisng to do.

    You get reimbursed for your license, so I am not sure why it is a concern with whether or not that they are a compact state.
  6. 0
    As a nurse in Florida.. I am wonderering what is the meaning of a compact state? I consider myself well educated and very diverse in many areas.. Just never heard this term before..
    Is this similar to holding a license in one state, having reciprosity in others?
    Courious..
  7. 0
    Quote from suzanne4
    There are many states that are not compact states, and it has not influenced my travel nursing at all. There is nothing that you can do, it is up to the board of nruisng to do.

    You get reimbursed for your license, so I am not sure why it is a concern with whether or not that they are a compact state.
    I'm ASSuming(and we all know where that gets you), that it would be easier to go from state to state(compact that is) than to apply to and wait for and pay for licenses in each state you wanted to go to. Like right now, I'm looking for a correctional travel assignment. I don't care where. IF one should suddenly come open AND(assuming again) that I was compact and they were compact, wouldn't it be quicker and easier to get working on the contract right away? My biggest dilema is that as I wait for something to open, and I'm usnsure as to where it will be, I'm only licensed in my state. I'd like to be able to say for instance, I'm available to work in any of these 5, or 6, or 12 states if you come up with something. I sure don't want to spend the time and money picking out say 4 states I'd like to go to, getting licensed, wait for a position and then get a call for a different state and have to hurry up and get THAT one. Mind you now this is all only theory because I've never applied to another state for licensure, but I have gone to some of the BON's web sites and it appears that I could grow old and grey waiting for my license to hurry up and come through. My guess is that once a spot opens someone already licensed in that state would be able to take it right away, while I would have to apply and wait.Maybe I'm wrong. I know that there are only about 11 or so states that are compact now, but that would sure open up a lot more opportunities for me to say"YES" immediately to a contract and just pack up and go. Anyway, a national license would be wonderful.
  8. 0
    [color=#999966]nurse licensure compact [color=#999966]:::


    | compact legislation | compact rules & regulation | optional enabling language | compact supporters |
    the mutual recognition model of nurse licensure allows a nurse to have one license (in his or her state of residency) and to practice in other states (both physical and electronic), subject to each state's practice law and regulation. under mutual recognition, a nurse may practice across state lines unless otherwise restricted. in order to achieve mutual recognition, each state must enact legislation authorizing the nurse licensure compact. states entering the compact also adopt administrative rules and regulations for implementation of the compact.

    once the compact is enacted, each compact state designates a nurse licensure compact administrator to facilitate the exchange of information between the states relating to compact nurse licensure and regulation. on january 10, 2000, the nurse licensure compact administrators (nlca) were organized to protect the publicís health and safety by promoting compliance with the laws governing the practice of nursing in each party state through the mutual recognition of party state licenses.

    since 1998, the compact has included registered nurses (rns) and licensed practical or vocational nurses (lpn/vns). on august 16, 2002, the ncsbn delegate assembly approved the adoption of model language for a licensure compact for advanced practice registered nurses (aprns). only those states that have adopted the rn and lpn/vn nurse licensure compact may implement a compact for aprns. on march 15, 2004, utah was the first state to pass aprn compact legislation. on april 25, 2005, the states of iowa and utah agreed to mutually recognize aprn licenses. no date has been set for the implementation of the aprn compact.

    to find out more about the nurse licensure compacts, use the links below:
    rn and lpn/vn compact
    aprn compact


    nurse licensure compact map
    nurse licensure compact: faq (pdf 28k)


    2003 ncsbn compact evaluation (pdf 15k)
    2003 ncsbn response to american nurse's association (ana) (pdf 135k)
  9. 0
    Many states actually have a walk-thru program for at least a temporary license.........I have never had any issues with getting a license right away.
  10. 0
    Quote from Sashi48
    Anybody have the inside scoop as to what is holding up Florida from becoming a compact state? I've been a nurse here for 27 years and never thought about it before. Now I'd like to do some travel nursing and it would be so much easier if Fl. was compact. Does anyone know if it's ever been discussed? What would it take to get the ball rolling?:roll
    It has been discussed frequently, along with ratios, etc.

    There are several reasons:

    Florida has an incredibly inefficient system for processing licenses. While things have improved, it used to be common to have 3-9 month waits for licensure. It is also one of the more expensive states to write boards or apply for reciprocity/endorsement. Florida has no state income tax, therefore they try to get (extort) money in other ways. For a while, impact fees were a big issue. If they permit compact license, they will lose revenue to the state.

    I believe that they also require fingerprint checks, which are then required by many places of health care employment. Many compact states do not require those.

    Yes, it would make sense, but until the Nursing shortage gets seriously severe there, it is doubtful that Jeb Bush will push any agenda that will reduce income to the government or hurt his "special interests" (ratios that might hurt the profits of Forprofit hospitals, added criminal checks that allay the fears of the AARP)

    Instead, the legislature has passed legislation to allow for low cost morgages, (a very self serving measure as alot of state moneys come from property taxes) and measures to forgive loan debt for nurses that go into teaching (which ignores the fact that you cannot be good nursing instructor without working as a nurse for several years....by which time, you would have paid much of that debt).
  11. 0
    Quote from caroladybelle
    It has been discussed frequently, along with ratios, etc.

    There are several reasons:

    Florida has an incredibly inefficient system for processing licenses. While things have improved, it used to be common to have 3-9 month waits for licensure. It is also one of the more expensive states to write boards or apply for reciprocity/endorsement. Florida has no state income tax, therefore they try to get (extort) money in other ways. For a while, impact fees were a big issue. If they permit compact license, they will lose revenue to the state.

    I believe that they also require fingerprint checks, which are then required by many places of health care employment. Many compact states do not require those.

    Yes, it would make sense, but until the Nursing shortage gets seriously severe there, it is doubtful that Jeb Bush will push any agenda that will reduce income to the government or hurt his "special interests" (ratios that might hurt the profits of Forprofit hospitals, added criminal checks that allay the fears of the AARP)

    Instead, the legislature has passed legislation to allow for low cost morgages, (a very self serving measure as alot of state moneys come from property taxes) and measures to forgive loan debt for nurses that go into teaching (which ignores the fact that you cannot be good nursing instructor without working as a nurse for several years....by which time, you would have paid much of that debt).

    Aaaahh, now don't complain about good old boy Jeb. He has visited my county, five times, since Charlie blew thru. He even handed out water and ice Poor fellow.

    Grannynurse
  12. 0
    Quote from grannynurse FNP student
    Aaaahh, now don't complain about good old boy Jeb. He has visited my county, five times, since Charlie blew thru. He even handed out water and ice Poor fellow.
    I always love it when they boast about "ALL the things that they have done to attract nurses to the state" and basically all of them are self serving. If I hear one more time about, "Well, wages are low but there is no state income tax", or "Wages are low, but you get paid in sunshine", I am gonna go postal.

    "Sunshine don't pay my Visa bill, honey"
  13. 0
    Quote from caroladybelle
    I always love it when they boast about "ALL the things that they have done to attract nurses to the state" and basically all of them are self serving. If I hear one more time about, "Well, wages are low but there is no state income tax", or "Wages are low, but you get paid in sunshine", I am gonna go postal.

    "Sunshine don't pay my Visa bill, honey"

    I remember going from $27 an hour to $6.10 an hour. And the sunshine didn't pay any of my bills either.

    Grannynurse


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